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49

Motivations to Drive: How Uber’s System Rewards Full-Time and Recreational Drivers Differently

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notes

Rosenblat, A. (2018). Motivations to Drive: How Uber’s System Rewards Full-Time and Recreational Drivers Differently. In Rosenblat, A. Uberland: How Algorithms Are Rewriting the Rules of Work. University of California Press, pp. 49-72

50

[...] There are three important categories of Uber drivers: hobbyists, part-timers, and full-timers. Hobbyists are drivers who, quite simply, don't need hte oney. Part-timers need the money but don't or can't work full time for a variety of reasons. Finally, full-timers are just that: people whose primary income is driving for Uber, some of whom put in significantly long hours. Most drivers work part time, but a minority are pulling long hours as full-time drivers [...]

—p.50 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago

[...] There are three important categories of Uber drivers: hobbyists, part-timers, and full-timers. Hobbyists are drivers who, quite simply, don't need hte oney. Part-timers need the money but don't or can't work full time for a variety of reasons. Finally, full-timers are just that: people whose primary income is driving for Uber, some of whom put in significantly long hours. Most drivers work part time, but a minority are pulling long hours as full-time drivers [...]

—p.50 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago
52

[...] Lyft's 2018 report also fofers a city-by-city breakdown of driver statistics, and itstates that in New York City, 91 pecent of drivers work fewer than twenty hours per week - but that may simply reflect the fact tat drivers who work full time are giving someoftheir hours to local competitors, like Uber, Juno, or Via. [...]

an important aspect to remember

—p.52 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago

[...] Lyft's 2018 report also fofers a city-by-city breakdown of driver statistics, and itstates that in New York City, 91 pecent of drivers work fewer than twenty hours per week - but that may simply reflect the fact tat drivers who work full time are giving someoftheir hours to local competitors, like Uber, Juno, or Via. [...]

an important aspect to remember

—p.52 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago
57

Raj has been driving professionally in Toronto for nine years ,first as a taxi driver, then as the owner of a for-hire vehicle business, and now for uberSelect, a higher-end service. He admires UBer's technology, but he sees the influx of nonoccupational drivers as a threat to his livelihood: "Competition is always good for everyone; but again, it should be reasonable not that you just flood the market." With the advent of Uber, he's become anxious about the stability of his income as a professional driver and is looking to change careeers. He keeps textbooks under the front passenger seat so that in between rides he can study to become a mortgage broker. In essence, Uber's model opens up employment opportunities for anyone who wants a job, but the conditions UBer sets for this workundermine driving as a viable occuption.

think about competition more. valorised by free marketeers (except when it might threaten their own business). how ot think about it? merely an illusion/tool wielded in self-interest, not a real unviersal belief?

—p.57 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago

Raj has been driving professionally in Toronto for nine years ,first as a taxi driver, then as the owner of a for-hire vehicle business, and now for uberSelect, a higher-end service. He admires UBer's technology, but he sees the influx of nonoccupational drivers as a threat to his livelihood: "Competition is always good for everyone; but again, it should be reasonable not that you just flood the market." With the advent of Uber, he's become anxious about the stability of his income as a professional driver and is looking to change careeers. He keeps textbooks under the front passenger seat so that in between rides he can study to become a mortgage broker. In essence, Uber's model opens up employment opportunities for anyone who wants a job, but the conditions UBer sets for this workundermine driving as a viable occuption.

think about competition more. valorised by free marketeers (except when it might threaten their own business). how ot think about it? merely an illusion/tool wielded in self-interest, not a real unviersal belief?

—p.57 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago
58

Raul, a New York Uber and LYft driver and a former Yellow Cab driver, was working eight to nine hours aday before rate cuts; now he works twelve to fourteen hours. He still values the flexibility [...] But having the autonomy to choose which fourteen of the twenty-four hours in a day to work doesn't create teh sense of freedom implied by the "flexibility" rhetoric/

—p.58 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago

Raul, a New York Uber and LYft driver and a former Yellow Cab driver, was working eight to nine hours aday before rate cuts; now he works twelve to fourteen hours. He still values the flexibility [...] But having the autonomy to choose which fourteen of the twenty-four hours in a day to work doesn't create teh sense of freedom implied by the "flexibility" rhetoric/

—p.58 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago
67

Mehmet used to drive a Toyota CAmry foruberX, which he rented for its TLC plates for ten months at $1,600 a month. Later, he upgraded his vehicle, investing $55,000 ina used luxury vehicle, so he could be eligible forthe higher uberBlack and uberSUV pay rates. His expenses for work amount to about $2,000 a month. He says that even drivers who bought that type ofcar new for $60,000 to $70,000 (the rangedepends on whether the driver has good orbad credit, according to another interviewee) used to make money, before rate cuts that Uber implemeted in January 2017.

it's old news but stil pretty incredible to me that Uber just expects drivers to bear all the cost

—p.67 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago

Mehmet used to drive a Toyota CAmry foruberX, which he rented for its TLC plates for ten months at $1,600 a month. Later, he upgraded his vehicle, investing $55,000 ina used luxury vehicle, so he could be eligible forthe higher uberBlack and uberSUV pay rates. His expenses for work amount to about $2,000 a month. He says that even drivers who bought that type ofcar new for $60,000 to $70,000 (the rangedepends on whether the driver has good orbad credit, according to another interviewee) used to make money, before rate cuts that Uber implemeted in January 2017.

it's old news but stil pretty incredible to me that Uber just expects drivers to bear all the cost

—p.67 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago
72

[...] The range of driver motivations within Uber's labor pool supports the company's business model of employing part-timers as the majority of its drivers and full-timers as the minority of its drivers: part-timers can inadvertently undermine the leverage that full-timers ned to advocate better working conditions. Though their motivations can overlap happy and unhappy drivers are products of a business model that opens up part-time opportunities for many at the expense of a dedicated few.

nice

incremental solutions here: hobbyists' income should be donated to pool (if they actually dont need it?) once you drive 40h a week you should be entitled to a minimum hourly pay? (maybe higher than if you drive less?) idk think about this more

(also full-timers should obviously have their equipment paid for)

—p.72 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago

[...] The range of driver motivations within Uber's labor pool supports the company's business model of employing part-timers as the majority of its drivers and full-timers as the minority of its drivers: part-timers can inadvertently undermine the leverage that full-timers ned to advocate better working conditions. Though their motivations can overlap happy and unhappy drivers are products of a business model that opens up part-time opportunities for many at the expense of a dedicated few.

nice

incremental solutions here: hobbyists' income should be donated to pool (if they actually dont need it?) once you drive 40h a week you should be entitled to a minimum hourly pay? (maybe higher than if you drive less?) idk think about this more

(also full-timers should obviously have their equipment paid for)

—p.72 by Alex Rosenblat 3 months, 1 week ago