Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

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You added a note
1 day, 23 hours ago

if women held half the jobs in Silicon Valley

Let's imagine a world where women hold half the jobs in Silicon Valley. Where half of entrepreneurs, executives, venture capitalists, board members, and employees - including engineers - are women.

[...] "I think there would be two enormous differences," the longtime tech investor Roger McNamee…

—p.250 Chapter 9 (249) by Emily Chang
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1 day, 23 hours ago

Silicon Valley success might be achieved in other ways

The Silicon Valley tropes around who becomes successful [...] young, single guys hacking all night, night after night, in a race to achieve their billion-dollar dreams. No families, no wives, no relationships, no real anything except the Product and the Dream. [...] Those young men have achieved …

—p.221 Chapter 7 (206) by Emily Chang
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1 day, 23 hours ago

Conference Room G

When a dancer wearing a gleaming-white bra and underwear approaches our table [...] tells me she is a teacher at a public middle school in Berkeley, doing summer day shifts at the club to help pay bills. She says she has met patrons from all of the brand-name tech companies nearby, specifically men…

—p.202 Chapter 6 (177) by Emily Chang
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1 day, 23 hours ago

there is no evidence that Justin did anything illegal piece/panopticon

[...] Binary Capital said the allegations were "false" and that while The Information had "found a few examples which show that Justin has in the past occasionally dated or flirted with women he met in a professional capacity, let's be clear: there is no evidence that Justin did anything illegal …

—p.162 Chapter 5 (135) by Emily Chang
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1 day, 23 hours ago

VCs who manage their son's T-ball league piece/panopticon

[...] because most venture capitalists are men, they are likely to be more passionate about ideas that appeal to, well, men. When Lake was raising her seed round, she noticed that a fair number of little league coaching apps were getting funded. "I'm like, how big of a business is that? Seriously, …

—p.157 Chapter 5 (135) by Emily Chang
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1 day, 23 hours ago

thank God we don't have an HR team piece/panopticon

Sexist behavior often comes from the top, and in Holmes's telling that was the case at Cooliris, where the young CEO, Soujanya Bhumkar, gave the entire staff copies of the Kama Sutra [...] Bhumkar would often joke, "Thank God we don't have an HR team," [...]

—p.114 Chapter 4 (105) by Emily Chang
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1 day, 23 hours ago

meritocracy would produce a new social stratification topic/meritocracy

But we didn't have a term for "meritocracy" until the twentieth century, when the British sociologist and politician Michael Young wrote a book in 1958 warning of how dangerous the world's relatively new method of establishing status might be. In his novel The Rise of the Meritocracy, Young portr…

—p.61 Chapter 2 (41) by Emily Chang
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2 days ago

four had built bombs in high school

Obviously, Thiel didn't consider himself one of those doomed lemmings. But how does one find other nonlemmings? Just look for unusual behavior. In his book, Thiel notes with pride that "of the six people who started PayPal, four had built bombs in high school." In our interview, he told me, "There …

—p.51 Chapter 2 (41) by Emily Chang
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2 days ago

PayPal was a perfect validation of merit

[...] Rabois believes PayPal is a "perfect validation of merit" and of Silicon Valley as a meritocracy. "None of us had any connection to anyone important in Silicon Valley," he told me. "We went from complete misfits to the establishment in five years. We were literally nobodies.[...]" The early P…

—p.48 Chapter 2 (41) by Emily Chang
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2 days ago

crystal vases from Tiffany and bottles of Dom Perignon piece/panopticon

For Trilogy's tenth anniversary, in 1999, Liemandt flew hundreds of employees to the Bahamas, where they stayed at the Atlantis Resort, and gifted employees crystal vases from Tiffany and bottles of Dom Perignon. When the first tech bubble burst, Liemandt's net worth plummeted, and in 2001 hundreds…

—p.36 Chapter 1 (15) by Emily Chang
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2 days ago

brainteasers are a complete waste of time

[...] Recall those brainteasers that Trilogy and other major tech companies used throughout the 1990s and into the next two decades. There has never been any evidence that they were useful in measuring who would be a good programmer. Yet it took until 2013 for Google to finally stop using them. "Br…

—p.34 Chapter 1 (15) by Emily Chang
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2 days ago

only the best

With Trilogy still in start-up mode, and Microsoft ratcheting up the competition for talent, Liemandt made a decision about hiring that might have been the single biggest bet of his entire career. He wagered that talented, overachieving students with zero real-world experience - that is, people lik…

—p.30 Chapter 1 (15) by Emily Chang
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1 week, 4 days ago
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1 week, 4 days ago
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1 week, 5 days ago

easier to tell yourself that you've worked harder

Ten years ago, the techies who became suddenly and extravagantly wealthy were were often self-conscious about flaunting their riches. It used to be that it wasn't cool, after your IPO, to pull up to the office in a Ferrari. But staying humble and empathic to those not in your rarefied circle or zip…

—p.12 Introduction (1) by Emily Chang
You added a note
1 week, 5 days ago

easier to tell yourself that you've worked harder

Ten years ago, the techies who became suddenly and extravagantly wealthy were were often self-conscious about flaunting their riches. It used to be that it wasn't cool, after your IPO, to pull up to the office in a Ferrari. But staying humble and empathic to those not in your rarefied circle or zip…

—p.12 Introduction (1) by Emily Chang
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1 week, 5 days ago

there were no women in the classroom at the time piece/panopticon

When I asked Pratt why he had never shared his role in Lena's story, [...] He seemed nonplussed when I pressed him about the controversy that still surrounds the choice of this test photo. “I haven't paid attention to [the controversy] at all,” he said. "[...] It was just natural that we would use …

—p.5 Introduction (1) by Emily Chang
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