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21

Driving as Glamorous Labor: How Uber Uses the Myths of the Sharing Economy

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Rosenblat, A. (2018). Driving as Glamorous Labor: How Uber Uses the Myths of the Sharing Economy. In Rosenblat, A. Uberland: How Algorithms Are Rewriting the Rules of Work. University of California Press, pp. 21-48

21

[...] Uber's employment model was born in the so-called sharing economy, a social technology movement that capitalized on the economicinstablity of the Great Recession to sell a narrative. [...]

i do like this definition

—p.21 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago

[...] Uber's employment model was born in the so-called sharing economy, a social technology movement that capitalized on the economicinstablity of the Great Recession to sell a narrative. [...]

i do like this definition

—p.21 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago
22

[...] frame their technologies as powerful engines of job creation. [...] While society may benefit from automated work, the fear is that these benefits will not be distributed equally: jobless futures imply some will get left behind. This threat isnot an inherent characteristic of technology but, rather, comes from the current Americaneconomic climate. [...]

nothing new but nicely summarised

—p.22 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago

[...] frame their technologies as powerful engines of job creation. [...] While society may benefit from automated work, the fear is that these benefits will not be distributed equally: jobless futures imply some will get left behind. This threat isnot an inherent characteristic of technology but, rather, comes from the current Americaneconomic climate. [...]

nothing new but nicely summarised

—p.22 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago
24

[...] Silicon Valley has a stroke stake in national debates over whether automation technology, such as self-driving cars, will take all ourjobs. Universal basic income is one form of "automationalimony" that is proposed to relieve the rising inequality often attributed to automation.

that's cute. think aboutthis more

—p.24 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago

[...] Silicon Valley has a stroke stake in national debates over whether automation technology, such as self-driving cars, will take all ourjobs. Universal basic income is one form of "automationalimony" that is proposed to relieve the rising inequality often attributed to automation.

that's cute. think aboutthis more

—p.24 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago
26

To join the Uber driver workforce, prospective drivers download the Uber driver app onto their mobile smartphones. They then take their Uber-eligible vehicles to local mechanics to be certified as in good working order and upload their driver's license numbers and autoinsuranec pplicy numbers to their accounts [...] afte cosenting to a background check that takes under a week in many places, they're ready to go [...]

usefulbackground for a story

—p.26 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago

To join the Uber driver workforce, prospective drivers download the Uber driver app onto their mobile smartphones. They then take their Uber-eligible vehicles to local mechanics to be certified as in good working order and upload their driver's license numbers and autoinsuranec pplicy numbers to their accounts [...] afte cosenting to a background check that takes under a week in many places, they're ready to go [...]

usefulbackground for a story

—p.26 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago
34

Silicon Valley carries the banner of "technological exceptionalism", the idea that the regulations and laws that apply to their industry competitors or predecessors do not apply to them for the simple reason that they identify primarily astechnology companies. These tech giants reason that the technology services they offer to achieve a familiar goal (lkemoving a passenger from A to B ina taxi) are qualitatively different from the actions that these laws were designed to govern. [...]

something to write about in a fragment or maybe my book: regulation is not inherently good but disrupting it is not either (despite imge ofanyregulated industry as ossified etc). consdier what the regulations are for. tech critics often assume that reg is good not realising (or caring) that its proponents assume that it's bad hence talking past each other

—p.34 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago

Silicon Valley carries the banner of "technological exceptionalism", the idea that the regulations and laws that apply to their industry competitors or predecessors do not apply to them for the simple reason that they identify primarily astechnology companies. These tech giants reason that the technology services they offer to achieve a familiar goal (lkemoving a passenger from A to B ina taxi) are qualitatively different from the actions that these laws were designed to govern. [...]

something to write about in a fragment or maybe my book: regulation is not inherently good but disrupting it is not either (despite imge ofanyregulated industry as ossified etc). consdier what the regulations are for. tech critics often assume that reg is good not realising (or caring) that its proponents assume that it's bad hence talking past each other

—p.34 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago
42

"I went through college throughout my adultlife," he reflects, "I didn't just go get it. I started when I was twenty-two. I would go to work, and I would have to quit school sometimes and work more hours. It took me about ten years on and off." With three children to raise - a daughter who is eighteen, and two sons, fifteen and ten - going to school full time wasn't an option, though he hopes his kids will go awayto college and do it all at once, for the experience. About hsi degree, he adds, "It hasn't helped me very much yet."

Michael's extended efforts to obtain a degree from a for-profit college give me pause, because it's an indicator that the established paths to middle-class life in America aren't working for him. [...] The rise of useless college degrees is a clear signal that the established systems of social mobility have failed in Ameria, and the gulf of oppurtiity is part of what makes jobs in the sharing economy appealing. Technology in the sharing or gig economy is framed as an intervention in the declining pathways toward upward class mobility.

degree frm a for-profit christian uni, interdisciplinary studies

thought for book: existence of a system, channels some people into dead ends - you shouldnt look at that and conclude that some people are just dumb. the system is taking advantage of them, and they could all individually become 10x "smarter" or savvier but what matters is their location within the system (bell curve)

—p.42 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago

"I went through college throughout my adultlife," he reflects, "I didn't just go get it. I started when I was twenty-two. I would go to work, and I would have to quit school sometimes and work more hours. It took me about ten years on and off." With three children to raise - a daughter who is eighteen, and two sons, fifteen and ten - going to school full time wasn't an option, though he hopes his kids will go awayto college and do it all at once, for the experience. About hsi degree, he adds, "It hasn't helped me very much yet."

Michael's extended efforts to obtain a degree from a for-profit college give me pause, because it's an indicator that the established paths to middle-class life in America aren't working for him. [...] The rise of useless college degrees is a clear signal that the established systems of social mobility have failed in Ameria, and the gulf of oppurtiity is part of what makes jobs in the sharing economy appealing. Technology in the sharing or gig economy is framed as an intervention in the declining pathways toward upward class mobility.

degree frm a for-profit christian uni, interdisciplinary studies

thought for book: existence of a system, channels some people into dead ends - you shouldnt look at that and conclude that some people are just dumb. the system is taking advantage of them, and they could all individually become 10x "smarter" or savvier but what matters is their location within the system (bell curve)

—p.42 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago
46

[...] Michael articulates the desire to truly be his own boss, and he enjoys the indepdendence he has as an UBer river that he didn't have in a previous job at a factory. He is grateful to have this job during a period of career transition. However, he may find himself working against higher commissions and rate cuts that UBer implements unilaterally. When the conditions of work change for UBer drivers, many hew closel to Uber's suggestions to work at particular places at particular times to earn premiums o their pay, effectively giving up some of their independence to work on a schedule that is subject to frequent changes and few guarantees.

—p.46 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago

[...] Michael articulates the desire to truly be his own boss, and he enjoys the indepdendence he has as an UBer river that he didn't have in a previous job at a factory. He is grateful to have this job during a period of career transition. However, he may find himself working against higher commissions and rate cuts that UBer implements unilaterally. When the conditions of work change for UBer drivers, many hew closel to Uber's suggestions to work at particular places at particular times to earn premiums o their pay, effectively giving up some of their independence to work on a schedule that is subject to frequent changes and few guarantees.

—p.46 by Alex Rosenblat 1 week, 3 days ago