Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

231

Westward the course of empire takes its way

bookmarker.dellsystem.me/s/westward
38
terms
20
notes
Needs summary

Foster Wallace, D. (1996). Westward the course of empire takes its way. In Foster Wallace, D. Girl with Curious Hair. W. W. Norton & Company, pp. 231-372

relating to double vision

235

the diplopic ad actor

because the guy has an eye turned inward

—p.235 default author
strange
1 year, 8 months ago

the diplopic ad actor

because the guy has an eye turned inward

—p.235 default author
strange
1 year, 8 months ago

(noun, Greek mythology) protective mantle of Zeus given to Athena

235

under the aegis of the same J.D. Steelritter

—p.235 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago

under the aegis of the same J.D. Steelritter

—p.235 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago

using or containing too many words; tediously lengthy

235

a prolix and confusing one

—p.235 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

a prolix and confusing one

—p.235 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago
237

By now Mark and D.L. were being seen together. Why? [...]

Yes and but he, Mark: why?

another example of this

—p.237 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

By now Mark and D.L. were being seen together. Why? [...]

Yes and but he, Mark: why?

another example of this

—p.237 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

(noun) twilight; dusk

237

in that gloaming territory between

—p.237 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

in that gloaming territory between

—p.237 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

(Greek mythology) Greek hero and subject of a play by Sophocles'

239

any more than brave Philoctetes of yore had needed that snakebite

—p.239 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

any more than brave Philoctetes of yore had needed that snakebite

—p.239 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago
240

Life goes on. You're empty, sad, probably the least appreciated creative virtuoso in the industry; well and but life just goes on, emptily, sadly, with always direction but never center. The hubless wheels spins ever faster, no? Yes. Admen approach challenges thus: concede what's hopelessly true, what you can't make folks ever want to not be so; concede; then take your creative arm and hammer a big soaked wedge, hard as can be, into whatever's open to interpretation. Interpret, argue, sing, whisper, work the wedge down into the pulp, where the real red juices be, where folks feel alone, fear their genitals, embrace their own shadows, want so badly it's a great subsonic groan, a lambent static only the trained adman's sticky ear can trap, retain, digest. Interpretation, he's fond of telling DeHaven, is persuasion's driveway. Persuasion is desire

nice passage, esp the beginning (inspiration for MC?)

—p.240 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

Life goes on. You're empty, sad, probably the least appreciated creative virtuoso in the industry; well and but life just goes on, emptily, sadly, with always direction but never center. The hubless wheels spins ever faster, no? Yes. Admen approach challenges thus: concede what's hopelessly true, what you can't make folks ever want to not be so; concede; then take your creative arm and hammer a big soaked wedge, hard as can be, into whatever's open to interpretation. Interpret, argue, sing, whisper, work the wedge down into the pulp, where the real red juices be, where folks feel alone, fear their genitals, embrace their own shadows, want so badly it's a great subsonic groan, a lambent static only the trained adman's sticky ear can trap, retain, digest. Interpretation, he's fond of telling DeHaven, is persuasion's driveway. Persuasion is desire

nice passage, esp the beginning (inspiration for MC?)

—p.240 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

(adjective) playing lightly on or over a surface; flickering / (adjective) softly bright or radiant / (adjective) marked by lightness or brilliance especially of expression

240

a lambent static only the trained adman's sticky ear can trap

—p.240 default author
uncertain
1 year, 6 months ago

a lambent static only the trained adman's sticky ear can trap

—p.240 default author
uncertain
1 year, 6 months ago
246

[...] He represents the Product. Is Ronald McDonald. Professionally. This son, this sty on the cosmic eyelid, this SHRDLU in the cosmic ad copy, represents the world's community restaurant.

god I love this

—p.246 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

[...] He represents the Product. Is Ronald McDonald. Professionally. This son, this sty on the cosmic eyelid, this SHRDLU in the cosmic ad copy, represents the world's community restaurant.

god I love this

—p.246 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

a stupid, awkward, or unlucky person

246

Schlemiel is the clumsy waiter who spills the scalding soup

—p.246 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

Schlemiel is the clumsy waiter who spills the scalding soup

—p.246 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

(also schlimazel) a consistently unlucky or accident-prone person

246

Schlamazl is the totally innocent hapless guy who gets spilled on

—p.246 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

Schlamazl is the totally innocent hapless guy who gets spilled on

—p.246 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago
248

Bagwanite's pirate squint

—p.248 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

Bagwanite's pirate squint

—p.248 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago
250

What's contemporarily tragic about Sternberg is that he has a fatal physical flaw. One of his eyes is turned completely around in his head. From the front it looks like a boiled egg. It won't come back around straight. It's like an injury. It's incredibly bad for his ambitions as a commercial actor. He doesn't talk about what the backward eye sees. He's offended that D.L. in person asked him right off the bat.

He has other flaws, too.

just a hilarious and really typical DFW passage

—p.250 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

What's contemporarily tragic about Sternberg is that he has a fatal physical flaw. One of his eyes is turned completely around in his head. From the front it looks like a boiled egg. It won't come back around straight. It's like an injury. It's incredibly bad for his ambitions as a commercial actor. He doesn't talk about what the backward eye sees. He's offended that D.L. in person asked him right off the bat.

He has other flaws, too.

just a hilarious and really typical DFW passage

—p.250 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago
254

Eyes the broad-shouldered faceless character that symbolizes Men's Room, does Sternberg, and struggles with himself. He's needed a bowel movement for hours, and since the LordAloft 7:10 lifted things have gotten critical. He tried, back at O'Hare. But he was unable to, because he was afraid to, afraid that Mark, who has the look of someone who never just has to, might enter the rest room and see Sternberg's shoes under a stall door and know that he, Sternberg, was having a bowel movement in the stall, infer that Sternberg had bowels, and thus organs, and thus a body. Like many Americans of his generation in this awkwardest of post-Imperial decades, an age suspended between exhaustion and replenishment, between input too ordinary to process and input too intense to bear, Sternberg is deeply ambivalent about being embodied; an informing fear that, were he really just an organism, he'd be nothing more than an ism of his organs.

typical DFW passage, esp the first sentence (idea for story)

—p.254 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

Eyes the broad-shouldered faceless character that symbolizes Men's Room, does Sternberg, and struggles with himself. He's needed a bowel movement for hours, and since the LordAloft 7:10 lifted things have gotten critical. He tried, back at O'Hare. But he was unable to, because he was afraid to, afraid that Mark, who has the look of someone who never just has to, might enter the rest room and see Sternberg's shoes under a stall door and know that he, Sternberg, was having a bowel movement in the stall, infer that Sternberg had bowels, and thus organs, and thus a body. Like many Americans of his generation in this awkwardest of post-Imperial decades, an age suspended between exhaustion and replenishment, between input too ordinary to process and input too intense to bear, Sternberg is deeply ambivalent about being embodied; an informing fear that, were he really just an organism, he'd be nothing more than an ism of his organs.

typical DFW passage, esp the first sentence (idea for story)

—p.254 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher who is numbered as one of the sophists by Plato

260

as hero, as Protagoras

—p.260 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

as hero, as Protagoras

—p.260 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago
262

[...] Ironically, a good part of his anticorporeal stance (it was his idea to call having a body Corporeal Punishment) derives from his nonfatal flaw, the skin trouble, the skin trouble itself deriving from a weekend years past, just before a cattle call for a Wisk spot he didn't get, a weekend of solo camping and getting-into-collar-soiled-character, with a tent, in the Berkshires, West of Boston, during which he'd contracted a mild spatter of poison sumac, and had purchased a discount generic brand of poison-sumac medicine he curses now and forever (like most terse-labeled generics the product was untrustworthy, turned out in fact to be medicine for the sumac, not the sufferer therefrom, but if the label says MEDICINE FOR POISON SUMAC what the fuck are you going to think, standing there?) that had set his face, neck, chest and back aflame: pulsing, cystic, volcanic, allergic, clotted, almost sacredly scarred. The sumac is so bad it hurts--which of course is a constant reminder that it's there, on his body--and it won't go away, no sooner healed by brand-name antitoxin than reinfected. The whole thing's just pretty loathsome, and you can bet Sternberg loathes it. He's unhappy, but in that comparatively neat and easy way of those who are at least pretty sure they know why they're unhappy, and what to curse, now and forever.

typical long-winded DFW passage but also hilarious (honestly the characterisation of Sternberg is amazing)

—p.262 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] Ironically, a good part of his anticorporeal stance (it was his idea to call having a body Corporeal Punishment) derives from his nonfatal flaw, the skin trouble, the skin trouble itself deriving from a weekend years past, just before a cattle call for a Wisk spot he didn't get, a weekend of solo camping and getting-into-collar-soiled-character, with a tent, in the Berkshires, West of Boston, during which he'd contracted a mild spatter of poison sumac, and had purchased a discount generic brand of poison-sumac medicine he curses now and forever (like most terse-labeled generics the product was untrustworthy, turned out in fact to be medicine for the sumac, not the sufferer therefrom, but if the label says MEDICINE FOR POISON SUMAC what the fuck are you going to think, standing there?) that had set his face, neck, chest and back aflame: pulsing, cystic, volcanic, allergic, clotted, almost sacredly scarred. The sumac is so bad it hurts--which of course is a constant reminder that it's there, on his body--and it won't go away, no sooner healed by brand-name antitoxin than reinfected. The whole thing's just pretty loathsome, and you can bet Sternberg loathes it. He's unhappy, but in that comparatively neat and easy way of those who are at least pretty sure they know why they're unhappy, and what to curse, now and forever.

typical long-winded DFW passage but also hilarious (honestly the characterisation of Sternberg is amazing)

—p.262 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

neologism? lexical + necromancical?

263

a linguistic bewitchment, a leximancical fraud

—p.263 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

a linguistic bewitchment, a leximancical fraud

—p.263 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago
263

But and so things are slow, and like you they have this irritating suspicion that any real satisfaction is still way, way off, and it's frustrating; but like basically decent kids they suck it up, bite the foil, because what's going on is just plain real; and no matter what we want, the real world is pretty slow, at present, for kids our age.

another instance of "but and so"-esque writing but also just a nice paragraph (I think the narrator here is another MFA student?)

—p.263 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

But and so things are slow, and like you they have this irritating suspicion that any real satisfaction is still way, way off, and it's frustrating; but like basically decent kids they suck it up, bite the foil, because what's going on is just plain real; and no matter what we want, the real world is pretty slow, at present, for kids our age.

another instance of "but and so"-esque writing but also just a nice paragraph (I think the narrator here is another MFA student?)

—p.263 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

(noun) instances of putting someone under duress?

266

carefully targeted inducements and duressments

—p.266 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

carefully targeted inducements and duressments

—p.266 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

(noun) alternative way of saying "Walpurgisnacht" or "Walpurgis Night", meaning Witches' Night; feast day of Saint Walpurga

266

to engage in general orgiastic Walpurgisrevel that would have just shot Faust's rocks

—p.266 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

to engage in general orgiastic Walpurgisrevel that would have just shot Faust's rocks

—p.266 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago
269

[...] We just want to ride, dude. Gratis. To the Reunion. We just want to do the bare unavoidable minimum. Pay taxes, die. Sternberg has resentment even he can't see, it's so deep inside. So an ugly mood, and a desperate need to evacuate his body. It's loathsomely real, I'm afraid. But what's to be done?

—p.269 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] We just want to ride, dude. Gratis. To the Reunion. We just want to do the bare unavoidable minimum. Pay taxes, die. Sternberg has resentment even he can't see, it's so deep inside. So an ugly mood, and a desperate need to evacuate his body. It's loathsomely real, I'm afraid. But what's to be done?

—p.269 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

a person, especially a priest in ancient Greece, who interprets sacred mysteries or esoteric principles

269
—p.269 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago
—p.269 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago

a feeling of melancholy and world-weariness; coined by German author Jean Paul

270

weltschmerzian end-lust aglitter

—p.270 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

weltschmerzian end-lust aglitter

—p.270 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

glittering especially with reflected light

270

aglitter in eyes far smaller than good old familiar occidental eyes

—p.270 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

aglitter in eyes far smaller than good old familiar occidental eyes

—p.270 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

(adj) relating to the west

270

good old familiar occidental eyes

—p.270 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago

good old familiar occidental eyes

—p.270 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago
274

"But Miss this Visa has unlimited credit. Look--it's got 'LIMIT: SKY' printed right on it. Embossed."

just a funny quote from DL when trying to rent a car

—p.274 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

"But Miss this Visa has unlimited credit. Look--it's got 'LIMIT: SKY' printed right on it. Embossed."

just a funny quote from DL when trying to rent a car

—p.274 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

green with vegetation; covered with growing plants or grass

275

verdant, tall, total, menacingly fertile

—p.275 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

verdant, tall, total, menacingly fertile

—p.275 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

(noun) a member of the Turkish infantry forming the Sultan's guard between the 14th and 19th centuries

279

beardedly distinguished non-Mormon Steelritter janissary

—p.279 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

beardedly distinguished non-Mormon Steelritter janissary

—p.279 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago
280

Cause it's only dark, generally, back there in his eye's guts. Sometimes a spidery system of synaptic color, if he tries to move the bad eye too quickly. But usually nothing. But it'll heal, anyway. It'll come around. It's all in his head, he knows. Youthful-rebellion injury. Mrs. Sternberg warned from day one that the boy that does a forbidden thing, such as like for example crosses his eyes just to hurt a mother: that boy finds they stay like that. Well-known fact. Look it up in whatever resources orthodox mothers with lapsed sons access. Like early to bed: it's the sleep before dark that's most important. Like don't cry: you're better than whoever laughs at you. Like try this lotion, for sumac.

Here's the fresh sumac cyst, though, here, boy, between his eyes. It's darkened richly since the last cyst-check in O'Hare, matured from that tomato pink to the same plum shade as the airport lounge. The mirror does not lie.

Your average deformity sufferer has a love-hate thing with mirrors: you need to see how things are progressing, but you also hate it that they're progressing. Sternberg's not at all sure he likes the idea of sharing a mirror with a whole lot of actors. He's not sure he wants to rent a bureaucratic car and head West without sleep or soap for a Funhouse the brochure says is carefully designed utilizing mostly systems of mirrors. A crowded, mirrored place ... Sternberg ponders the idea as the automatic sink fills gurgling to his slit of the emergency drain at its rim. This sumac cyst between is eyes feels fucking alive, man. Pulses painfully with the squeak of his head's blood. The cyst is beginning to show a little bit of white at the acme. Not good. Clear evidence of white blood cells, which implies blood cells, and so a bloodstream. From there it doesn't take genius to figure out that you've got a body. A bit of white at an infected cyst's cap is pretty much embodiedness embodied. No way he's messing with the fucker, though. It would just love to be messed with. Would feed on it. And the stage after plum is eggplant, big and dusky and curved, like a new organ in itself, to be an ism of.

—p.280 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

Cause it's only dark, generally, back there in his eye's guts. Sometimes a spidery system of synaptic color, if he tries to move the bad eye too quickly. But usually nothing. But it'll heal, anyway. It'll come around. It's all in his head, he knows. Youthful-rebellion injury. Mrs. Sternberg warned from day one that the boy that does a forbidden thing, such as like for example crosses his eyes just to hurt a mother: that boy finds they stay like that. Well-known fact. Look it up in whatever resources orthodox mothers with lapsed sons access. Like early to bed: it's the sleep before dark that's most important. Like don't cry: you're better than whoever laughs at you. Like try this lotion, for sumac.

Here's the fresh sumac cyst, though, here, boy, between his eyes. It's darkened richly since the last cyst-check in O'Hare, matured from that tomato pink to the same plum shade as the airport lounge. The mirror does not lie.

Your average deformity sufferer has a love-hate thing with mirrors: you need to see how things are progressing, but you also hate it that they're progressing. Sternberg's not at all sure he likes the idea of sharing a mirror with a whole lot of actors. He's not sure he wants to rent a bureaucratic car and head West without sleep or soap for a Funhouse the brochure says is carefully designed utilizing mostly systems of mirrors. A crowded, mirrored place ... Sternberg ponders the idea as the automatic sink fills gurgling to his slit of the emergency drain at its rim. This sumac cyst between is eyes feels fucking alive, man. Pulses painfully with the squeak of his head's blood. The cyst is beginning to show a little bit of white at the acme. Not good. Clear evidence of white blood cells, which implies blood cells, and so a bloodstream. From there it doesn't take genius to figure out that you've got a body. A bit of white at an infected cyst's cap is pretty much embodiedness embodied. No way he's messing with the fucker, though. It would just love to be messed with. Would feed on it. And the stage after plum is eggplant, big and dusky and curved, like a new organ in itself, to be an ism of.

—p.280 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago
282

The sink, with a gurgled sigh like almost mercy, overflows, emergency drain-slit and all, Sternberg's spent so unmercifully so much time in here. The water gurgles over the rim and onto the crotch of his gabardines. Great. That's just great. Now it looks like he's maybe wet himself. And what's he supposed to say. Or even if he doesn't say anything. Either way, explanation or interpretation, he comes out embodied. He demands compassion from a mirror he's backed away from, hoping to make the water stop. But it doesn't. Maybe it's been on too long. It's spilling onto the floor. Great. He demands compassion. Except of whom, though?

—p.282 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

The sink, with a gurgled sigh like almost mercy, overflows, emergency drain-slit and all, Sternberg's spent so unmercifully so much time in here. The water gurgles over the rim and onto the crotch of his gabardines. Great. That's just great. Now it looks like he's maybe wet himself. And what's he supposed to say. Or even if he doesn't say anything. Either way, explanation or interpretation, he comes out embodied. He demands compassion from a mirror he's backed away from, hoping to make the water stop. But it doesn't. Maybe it's been on too long. It's spilling onto the floor. Great. He demands compassion. Except of whom, though?

—p.282 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago
286

Because DeHaven Steelritter, son, has unwittingly given J.D. some of J.D.'s most creative and inspired ideas. It was DeHaven who first poured Arm & Hammer baking soda down the drain of the Steelritter farmhouse kitchen, in Collision, to try to erase the indelible odor of two marijuana roaches mistakenly washed down there along with the remains of something sweet. What happened to the fridge's baking soda? asks Mrs. Steelritter, who fears the noisomely oily smell of the fried roses that festoon the second-to-the-bottom refrigerator shelf. Where's my Arm and Hammer? she asks, as they sit down to a giant Midwest supper. DeHaven--who, like anybody who smokes dope under his parents' roof, is quick on his feet when it comes to explaining wild kitchen incongruities--delineates a deep concern for the impression the odor of the Steelritter drain could have made on the next houseguest who just might visit the kitchen and have occasion to get a whiff of the drain that, he declares, dry-mouthed, had smelled like death embodied.

ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF HOW SOME OF J.D. STEELRITTER'S MOST POWERFUL AND LEGENDARY PUBLIC-RELATIONS CREATIONS ARE REALLY NOTHING MORE THAN A SLIGHT TRANSFIGURATION OF WHAT REALLY JUST GOES ON AROUND HIS OWN ROSE FARM'S FARMHOUSE

One fine winter morning, years back, J.D. Steelritter was getting ready to go off to work at the J.D. Steelritter Advertising Complex, just across the snowy, greenhouse-dotted fields and intersection from home. But anyway he's heading for the door, and little DeHaven, home from sixth grade (his second shot at it) with one of those mysterious feverless colds that just cry out to be nipped in the bud--he tells J.D., in complete innocence, the innocence of a child before a television, to have a nice day.

The rest, as they say.

—p.286 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

Because DeHaven Steelritter, son, has unwittingly given J.D. some of J.D.'s most creative and inspired ideas. It was DeHaven who first poured Arm & Hammer baking soda down the drain of the Steelritter farmhouse kitchen, in Collision, to try to erase the indelible odor of two marijuana roaches mistakenly washed down there along with the remains of something sweet. What happened to the fridge's baking soda? asks Mrs. Steelritter, who fears the noisomely oily smell of the fried roses that festoon the second-to-the-bottom refrigerator shelf. Where's my Arm and Hammer? she asks, as they sit down to a giant Midwest supper. DeHaven--who, like anybody who smokes dope under his parents' roof, is quick on his feet when it comes to explaining wild kitchen incongruities--delineates a deep concern for the impression the odor of the Steelritter drain could have made on the next houseguest who just might visit the kitchen and have occasion to get a whiff of the drain that, he declares, dry-mouthed, had smelled like death embodied.

ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF HOW SOME OF J.D. STEELRITTER'S MOST POWERFUL AND LEGENDARY PUBLIC-RELATIONS CREATIONS ARE REALLY NOTHING MORE THAN A SLIGHT TRANSFIGURATION OF WHAT REALLY JUST GOES ON AROUND HIS OWN ROSE FARM'S FARMHOUSE

One fine winter morning, years back, J.D. Steelritter was getting ready to go off to work at the J.D. Steelritter Advertising Complex, just across the snowy, greenhouse-dotted fields and intersection from home. But anyway he's heading for the door, and little DeHaven, home from sixth grade (his second shot at it) with one of those mysterious feverless colds that just cry out to be nipped in the bud--he tells J.D., in complete innocence, the innocence of a child before a television, to have a nice day.

The rest, as they say.

—p.286 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

(verb) adorn (a place) with ribbons, garlands, or other decorations; (verb) a chain or garland of flowers, leaves, or ribbons, hung in a curve as a decoration

287

fried roses that festoon the second-to-the-bottom refrigerator shelf

—p.287 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago

fried roses that festoon the second-to-the-bottom refrigerator shelf

—p.287 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago

obtain (something that is desired) by persuading others to comply or by manipulating events

289

wangled a tête-à-tête

—p.289 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago

wangled a tête-à-tête

—p.289 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago

(adj) fond of or adapted to luxury or indulgence in sensual pleasures; having luxurious tastes or habits, especially in eating and drinking

289

more like an epicurean taste for

—p.289 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

more like an epicurean taste for

—p.289 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago
290

[...] but it's a bit too late in the game for this ploy to do more than cover some losses, and the pesticide salesman is angst-ridden and red-eyed and effetely low on self-esteem, and wants very much to ball this ageless but oddly sexy orange-faced stewardess, as further coverage against estimable losses.

the previous bit is the pesticide agent recounting how this year's corn crop has seemingly developed an immunity to and even taste for his pesticide, and so he's not doing well, and his only hope is to market the pesticide as Pest-Aside in the hopes of drawing off the pests into a different field

—p.290 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] but it's a bit too late in the game for this ploy to do more than cover some losses, and the pesticide salesman is angst-ridden and red-eyed and effetely low on self-esteem, and wants very much to ball this ageless but oddly sexy orange-faced stewardess, as further coverage against estimable losses.

the previous bit is the pesticide agent recounting how this year's corn crop has seemingly developed an immunity to and even taste for his pesticide, and so he's not doing well, and his only hope is to market the pesticide as Pest-Aside in the hopes of drawing off the pests into a different field

—p.290 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago
303

[...] If all blacks are great dancers and athletes, and all Orientals are smart and identical and industrious, and all Jews are great makers of money and literature, wielders of a clout born of cohesion, and all Latins great lovers and stiletto-wielders and slippers-past-borders--well then gee, what does that make all plain old American WASPs? What one great feature, for the racist, brings us whitebreads together under the solid roof of stereotype? Nothing. A nameless faceless Great White Male. Racism seems to Mark a kind of weird masochism. A way to make us feel utterly and pointlessly alone. Unidentified. More than Sternberg hates being embodied, more than D.L. hates premodern realism, Mark hates to believe he is Alone. It's the high siren's song of the wrist's big razor. It's the end of the long, long, long race you're watching, but at the end you fail to see who won, so entranced are you with the exhausted beauty of the runners' faces as they cross the taped line to totter in agonized circles, hands on hips, bent.

In a related development, Mark Nechtr is now revealed by me to have professionally diagnosed emotional problems.

—p.303 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] If all blacks are great dancers and athletes, and all Orientals are smart and identical and industrious, and all Jews are great makers of money and literature, wielders of a clout born of cohesion, and all Latins great lovers and stiletto-wielders and slippers-past-borders--well then gee, what does that make all plain old American WASPs? What one great feature, for the racist, brings us whitebreads together under the solid roof of stereotype? Nothing. A nameless faceless Great White Male. Racism seems to Mark a kind of weird masochism. A way to make us feel utterly and pointlessly alone. Unidentified. More than Sternberg hates being embodied, more than D.L. hates premodern realism, Mark hates to believe he is Alone. It's the high siren's song of the wrist's big razor. It's the end of the long, long, long race you're watching, but at the end you fail to see who won, so entranced are you with the exhausted beauty of the runners' faces as they cross the taped line to totter in agonized circles, hands on hips, bent.

In a related development, Mark Nechtr is now revealed by me to have professionally diagnosed emotional problems.

—p.303 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

the territory that a state or nation believes is needed for its natural development, especially associated with Nazi Germany

304

of the land speculator's need for läbensraum

—p.304 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

of the land speculator's need for läbensraum

—p.304 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago
308

[...] We all have our little solipsistic delusions, ghastly intuitions of utter singularity: that we are the only one in the house who ever fills the ice-cube tray, who unloads the clean dishwasher, who occasionally pees in the shower, whose eyelid twitches on first dates; [...] That only we love the only-we. That only we need the only-we. Solipsis binds us together, J.D. knows. That we feel lonely in a crowd; stop not to dwell on what's brought the crowd into being. That we are, always, faces in a crowd. It's Steelritter's meat.

—p.308 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] We all have our little solipsistic delusions, ghastly intuitions of utter singularity: that we are the only one in the house who ever fills the ice-cube tray, who unloads the clean dishwasher, who occasionally pees in the shower, whose eyelid twitches on first dates; [...] That only we love the only-we. That only we need the only-we. Solipsis binds us together, J.D. knows. That we feel lonely in a crowd; stop not to dwell on what's brought the crowd into being. That we are, always, faces in a crowd. It's Steelritter's meat.

—p.308 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

(genetics) the interaction of genes that are not alleles, in particular the suppression of the effect of one such gene by another

309

succumbs via epistasis to the bewitchment of the Mesmermaze he spins

—p.309 default author
strange
1 year, 8 months ago

succumbs via epistasis to the bewitchment of the Mesmermaze he spins

—p.309 default author
strange
1 year, 8 months ago
309

[...] The enormous crowd J.D. hath wrought over thirty years of time purchased second by expensive second will come together, lose the supplicants' courtesy that atomizes crowds, and desire past all earthly care the rendition of fat, the sigh of oil, the sparkle of carbonation, the consumption of government-inspected flesh. [...]

nice sentence

—p.309 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] The enormous crowd J.D. hath wrought over thirty years of time purchased second by expensive second will come together, lose the supplicants' courtesy that atomizes crowds, and desire past all earthly care the rendition of fat, the sigh of oil, the sparkle of carbonation, the consumption of government-inspected flesh. [...]

nice sentence

—p.309 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

a step or platform on which an altar is placed

310

arches, altar, predella

—p.310 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

arches, altar, predella

—p.310 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

(adj) relating to German organic chemist Friedrich August Kekulé, who discovered the structure of benzene in an Friedrich ouroboros-themed dream

313

red Kekulian serpent

—p.313 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

red Kekulian serpent

—p.313 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago
319

D.L. is utterly silent throughout this exchange, watching the odometer begin slowly to lose its magic. There is a reason for her silence that is in a way parallel to the historical U.S. conflict in Vietnam. For her, Vietnam does not exist except as complicatedly cancelled letters and hissingly connected phone calls, a completely flat-eyed father whom she first met on a tarmac at nine. Who had a hook. Who dropped at automobile backfires (Datsuns never backfire--too little power), who gazed dully and accepting at the mosquito feeding at his one big bicep. Who's long gone, now. Who left a note.

hauntingly magical paragraph

—p.319 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

D.L. is utterly silent throughout this exchange, watching the odometer begin slowly to lose its magic. There is a reason for her silence that is in a way parallel to the historical U.S. conflict in Vietnam. For her, Vietnam does not exist except as complicatedly cancelled letters and hissingly connected phone calls, a completely flat-eyed father whom she first met on a tarmac at nine. Who had a hook. Who dropped at automobile backfires (Datsuns never backfire--too little power), who gazed dully and accepting at the mosquito feeding at his one big bicep. Who's long gone, now. Who left a note.

hauntingly magical paragraph

—p.319 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

the killing of insects, presumably

321

the other hand is inflicting absolute entomicide

—p.321 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago

the other hand is inflicting absolute entomicide

—p.321 default author
notable
1 year, 8 months ago
322

[...] J.D. sometimes looks at DeHaven with this sort of objective horrified amazement: I made that?

—p.322 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] J.D. sometimes looks at DeHaven with this sort of objective horrified amazement: I made that?

—p.322 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago
326

Mark decides on maybe just one petal, to tide him over against arrival.

as D.L. is telling everyone about his writer's block

—p.326 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

Mark decides on maybe just one petal, to tide him over against arrival.

as D.L. is telling everyone about his writer's block

—p.326 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

relating to phylogeny (the development or evolution of a particular group of organisms)

332

bottomless dread and phylogenic lust

—p.332 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago

bottomless dread and phylogenic lust

—p.332 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago

a person who renounces a religious or political belief or principle; the general form is "apostasy"

335
—p.335 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago
—p.335 default author
uncertain
1 year, 8 months ago
336

"These things are the violent end of American advertising, kid," J.D. grimaces critically at the dusty, well-traveled crud in the blurred Baggie. "Advertising embodied."

Sternbeg horrified for real: "What?"

the "Sternbeg" is a typo (I think?) in the book. the idea of him reacting so strongly to the word "embodied" that's brought up innocently by someone else is nice

—p.336 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

"These things are the violent end of American advertising, kid," J.D. grimaces critically at the dusty, well-traveled crud in the blurred Baggie. "Advertising embodied."

Sternbeg horrified for real: "What?"

the "Sternbeg" is a typo (I think?) in the book. the idea of him reacting so strongly to the word "embodied" that's brought up innocently by someone else is nice

—p.336 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 6 months ago

(noun) a piece of machinery for lifting cargo or extracting oil

345

watching his gabardines go up and down like a derrick

—p.345 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago

watching his gabardines go up and down like a derrick

—p.345 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago

(adj) relating to or dependent on charity; charitable

347

eleemosynary fiction desires charity

—p.347 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

eleemosynary fiction desires charity

—p.347 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

declivated: downward sloping; declivity: downward slope

347

declivated shape

—p.347 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

declivated shape

—p.347 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

(noun) a usually short sermon / (noun) a lecture or discourse on or of a moral theme / (noun) an inspirational catchphrase or platitude. homiletic: the art of preaching or writing sermons

347

homiletic fiction desires peace

—p.347 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

homiletic fiction desires peace

—p.347 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

upward sloping

349

acclivated shape

—p.349 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

acclivated shape

—p.349 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

(adj) relating to the study of place names (toponyms)

353

toponymic topoi

—p.353 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago

toponymic topoi

—p.353 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago

(noun, from Greek) plural of topos; used in the context of classical Greek rhetoric to mean "topic"

353

toponymic topoi

—p.353 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

toponymic topoi

—p.353 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

(adj) having or encouraging an excessive interest in sexual matters

355
—p.355 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago
—p.355 default author
confirm
1 year, 8 months ago

(noun, ancient Greek) presence, arrival, or official visit

355

type of parousia whose advent leaves exactly zero to chance

—p.355 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago

type of parousia whose advent leaves exactly zero to chance

—p.355 default author
unknown
1 year, 8 months ago