Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

85

"Then Out of the Rubble": David Foster Wallace's Early Fiction

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terms
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notes

mostly about Westward and Broom. mentions Wittgenstein, solipsism, the threat of irony. not sure how to summarize it succinctly but it was kind of interesting

J. Fest, B. (2014). "Then Out of the Rubble": David Foster Wallace's Early Fiction. In ? David Foster Wallace and "The Long Thing": New Essays on the Novels. Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 85-106

the part of theology concerned with death, judgment, and the final destiny of the soul and of humankind

86

Referring at once to the persistence of eschatological discourse despite the failure of the prophesied apocalypse ever to arrive

—p.86 by Bradley J. Fest
unknown
2 years ago

Referring at once to the persistence of eschatological discourse despite the failure of the prophesied apocalypse ever to arrive

—p.86 by Bradley J. Fest
unknown
2 years ago

make (something abstract) more concrete or real

87

the reifying shackles of apocalyptic discourse

—p.87 by Bradley J. Fest
uncertain
2 years ago

the reifying shackles of apocalyptic discourse

—p.87 by Bradley J. Fest
uncertain
2 years ago

ambiguous; occupying a position at, or on both sides of, a boundary or threshold

88

she is a liminal horizon the novel repetitively posits

—p.88 by Bradley J. Fest
uncertain
2 years ago

she is a liminal horizon the novel repetitively posits

—p.88 by Bradley J. Fest
uncertain
2 years ago

the study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation (adj: semiotic)

88

semiotic square

—p.88 by Bradley J. Fest
uncertain
2 years ago

semiotic square

—p.88 by Bradley J. Fest
uncertain
2 years ago

philosophical and metaphysical theories of divine presence in which the divine encompasses or is manifested in the material world

90

first encountered recently (in a DFW-related book I think)

—p.90 by Bradley J. Fest
confirm
2 years ago

first encountered recently (in a DFW-related book I think)

—p.90 by Bradley J. Fest
confirm
2 years ago

(noun) an expression of real or pretended doubt or uncertainty especially for rhetorical effect / (noun) a logical impasse or contradiction / (noun) a radical contradiction in the import of a text or theory that is seen in deconstruction as inevitable

92

how they manifest in the aporia between self and other

—p.92 by Bradley J. Fest
unknown
2 years ago

how they manifest in the aporia between self and other

—p.92 by Bradley J. Fest
unknown
2 years ago

to a notable degree; very

93

eminently destructible

—p.93 by Bradley J. Fest
strange
2 years ago

eminently destructible

—p.93 by Bradley J. Fest
strange
2 years ago

beginning

95

(noun) an ultimate end (from Greek)

95

rare psychiatric disorder characterized by reversible amnesia for personal identity, including the memories, personality, and other identifying characteristics of individuality

96
—p.96 by Bradley J. Fest
uncertain
2 years ago
—p.96 by Bradley J. Fest
uncertain
2 years ago

uncanny (used by Freud)

97

ethical component of the personality and provides the moral standards by which the ego operates (acc to Sigmund Freud)

97

of or relating to Matthew Arnold (1822–1888), British poet and cultural critic who celebrated virtue

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Arnoldian-reverse

—p.99 by Bradley J. Fest
unknown
2 years ago

Arnoldian-reverse

—p.99 by Bradley J. Fest
unknown
2 years ago
104

[...] I believe that "Westward"'s fictional project should instead be read as, if not as accomplishing, then at least pointing toward a relationship to irony that is anti-eschatological, that acknowledges irony's fundamental "temporality that is not organic," and that it "allows for no end, for no totality." In other words, Wallace's mode of getting metafiction's Armageddon-explosion "over with," is based on an acknowlegment that not only can there not be such an explosion, but that the whole aesthetic approach that privileges such an eschatology is not only problematic, but threatening. [...]

—p.104 by Bradley J. Fest 1 year, 9 months ago

[...] I believe that "Westward"'s fictional project should instead be read as, if not as accomplishing, then at least pointing toward a relationship to irony that is anti-eschatological, that acknowledges irony's fundamental "temporality that is not organic," and that it "allows for no end, for no totality." In other words, Wallace's mode of getting metafiction's Armageddon-explosion "over with," is based on an acknowlegment that not only can there not be such an explosion, but that the whole aesthetic approach that privileges such an eschatology is not only problematic, but threatening. [...]

—p.104 by Bradley J. Fest 1 year, 9 months ago