Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

(noun) germanic

3

‘How come Being?’ is a supreme example of a pseudo-question [...] For them, it is really just a ponderous Teutonic way of saying ‘Wow!’

I just think it's a great word

—p.3 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

‘How come Being?’ is a supreme example of a pseudo-question [...] For them, it is really just a ponderous Teutonic way of saying ‘Wow!’

I just think it's a great word

—p.3 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

make (something abstract) more concrete or real

6

Nietzsche, however, believed neither in mega-entities nor in everyday ones. He thought the very idea of there being distinct objects, such as God or gooseberries, was just a reifying effect of language.

—p.6 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

Nietzsche, however, believed neither in mega-entities nor in everyday ones. He thought the very idea of there being distinct objects, such as God or gooseberries, was just a reifying effect of language.

—p.6 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

referring to an apocryphal anecdote illustrating the piety or humility of King Canute the Great, in which he demonstrates to his courtiers that he has no control over the elements (the incoming tide), explaining that secular power is vain compared to the supreme power of God

7

The philosopher must simply wage a ceaseless, Canute-like war against them – a battle which Wittgenstein sees as a kind of linguistic therapy, and which Derrida terms ‘deconstruction’.

them being metaphysical illusions

—p.7 Questions and answers (1) default author
uncertain
1 year, 4 months ago

The philosopher must simply wage a ceaseless, Canute-like war against them – a battle which Wittgenstein sees as a kind of linguistic therapy, and which Derrida terms ‘deconstruction’.

them being metaphysical illusions

—p.7 Questions and answers (1) default author
uncertain
1 year, 4 months ago

(noun) a branch of metaphysics concerned with the nature and relations of being / (noun) a particular theory about the nature of being or the kinds of things that have existence

13

ontological anxiety’: namely, the feeling (sometimes accompanied by a particularly intense hangover) that one is a pointless, superfluous being

—p.13 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

ontological anxiety’: namely, the feeling (sometimes accompanied by a particularly intense hangover) that one is a pointless, superfluous being

—p.13 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

the presence of something only in small or insufficient quantities or amounts; scarcity

16

In the conflict between Western capitalism and radical Islam, a paucity of belief squares up to an excess of it.

—p.16 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

In the conflict between Western capitalism and radical Islam, a paucity of belief squares up to an excess of it.

—p.16 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

the study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation (adj: semiotic)

17

For St Augustine, to attend to objects in themselves reflects a carnal, fallen mode of existence; instead, we must read them semiotically, as pointing beyond themselves to the divine text which is the universe

—p.17 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

For St Augustine, to attend to objects in themselves reflects a carnal, fallen mode of existence; instead, we must read them semiotically, as pointing beyond themselves to the divine text which is the universe

—p.17 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

(noun) a branch of metaphysics concerned with the nature and relations of being / (noun) a particular theory about the nature of being or the kinds of things that have existence

19

By the early decades of the twentieth century, this culture, with its attendant ontological anxieties, had taken the form of modernism.

—p.19 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

By the early decades of the twentieth century, this culture, with its attendant ontological anxieties, had taken the form of modernism.

—p.19 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

make (something abstract) more concrete or real

22

Yet this was true only of the work of art’s form. Since its content inevitably reflected the reified world around it, it could provide no lasting source of redemption.

on art as a potential source of human value

—p.22 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

Yet this was true only of the work of art’s form. Since its content inevitably reflected the reified world around it, it could provide no lasting source of redemption.

on art as a potential source of human value

—p.22 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

(adjective) fatty oily / (adjective) smooth and greasy in texture or appearance / (adjective) plastic / (adjective) full of unction / (adjective) revealing or marked by a smug, ingratiating, and false earnestness or spirituality

31

Michael Palin as an unctuous Anglican vicar in the Monty Python film, ‘The Meaning of Life’.

—p.31 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

Michael Palin as an unctuous Anglican vicar in the Monty Python film, ‘The Meaning of Life’.

—p.31 Questions and answers (1) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

(noun) pretentious inflated speech or writing

41

Like a bombastic speech, life appears to be meaningful but is actually vapid.

—p.41 The problem of meaning (33) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

Like a bombastic speech, life appears to be meaningful but is actually vapid.

—p.41 The problem of meaning (33) default author
notable
1 year, 4 months ago