Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

Author

The Meaning of Life
by multiple authors


1

Questions and answers

  • talks a lot about Wittgenstein's theories on false questions + the idea of private languages (the pain example)
  • on religion and how its decline ushered in a world where meaning was suddenly uncertain
  • on celebrity fads and the commercialisation of the search for meaning
  • on the role that sport plays in many peoples' lives
/
1

Questions and answers

  • talks a lot about Wittgenstein's theories on false questions + the idea of private languages (the pain example)
  • on religion and how its decline ushered in a world where meaning was suddenly uncertain
  • on celebrity fads and the commercialisation of the search for meaning
  • on the role that sport plays in many peoples' lives
/
33

The problem of meaning

  • splits out various common definitions of meaning as either: 1) intending; 2) signifying; or 3) intending to signify, none of which work for "the meaning of life"
  • a little more on language-games (without calling them that)
  • the famous soliloquy from Macbeth (sound and fury, signifying nothing, etc)
  • Schopenhauer's views on mankind being victim to a malevolent greater power
  • Althusser on ideology being, perhaps, necessary
  • Lacan on the dichotomy between meaning and being
/
33

The problem of meaning

  • splits out various common definitions of meaning as either: 1) intending; 2) signifying; or 3) intending to signify, none of which work for "the meaning of life"
  • a little more on language-games (without calling them that)
  • the famous soliloquy from Macbeth (sound and fury, signifying nothing, etc)
  • Schopenhauer's views on mankind being victim to a malevolent greater power
  • Althusser on ideology being, perhaps, necessary
  • Lacan on the dichotomy between meaning and being
/
56

The eclipse of meaning

  • how some writers like Chekhov, Conrad, Kafka, Beckett feature a "central absence" in their work, since the societal (?) slipping away of meaning was noticeable during their lifetimes
  • on the other hand, postmodernism doesn't have the same issue, since it's not old enough to recall a time when there was meaning
  • a lot about Beckett straddling modernism and postmodernism (Eagleton seems to really like Beckett)
  • goes into what is essentially death-of-the-author stuff without referring to it by name
  • also transcedence vs facticity, though again without using those words (I guess they're old ideas)
/
56

The eclipse of meaning

  • how some writers like Chekhov, Conrad, Kafka, Beckett feature a "central absence" in their work, since the societal (?) slipping away of meaning was noticeable during their lifetimes
  • on the other hand, postmodernism doesn't have the same issue, since it's not old enough to recall a time when there was meaning
  • a lot about Beckett straddling modernism and postmodernism (Eagleton seems to really like Beckett)
  • goes into what is essentially death-of-the-author stuff without referring to it by name
  • also transcedence vs facticity, though again without using those words (I guess they're old ideas)
/
78

Is life what you make it?

on Aristotle, and inequality, and individual/common answers to the question

/
78

Is life what you make it?

on Aristotle, and inequality, and individual/common answers to the question

/

Why Marx Was Right
by multiple authors


1

Chapter One

claim: Marxism is no longer relevant. response: no, cus there is still exploitation

/
1

Chapter One

claim: Marxism is no longer relevant. response: no, cus there is still exploitation

/
12

Chapter Two

claim: actually existing socialism is awful and oppressive. response: it was only ever implemented as a last resort (kinda like women being given CEOships), in conditions of scarcity, with every other country wanting it to fail

/
12

Chapter Two

claim: actually existing socialism is awful and oppressive. response: it was only ever implemented as a last resort (kinda like women being given CEOships), in conditions of scarcity, with every other country wanting it to fail

/
30

Chapter Three

claim: too deterministic. response: institutional/structural factors still leave room for individual action

/
30

Chapter Three

claim: too deterministic. response: institutional/structural factors still leave room for individual action

/
64

Chapter Four

claim: presumes a utopian view of human nature. response: structure can drastically change human behaviour, esp since the worst human behaviours are often the result of material scarcity

/
64

Chapter Four

claim: presumes a utopian view of human nature. response: structure can drastically change human behaviour, esp since the worst human behaviours are often the result of material scarcity

/
107

Chapter Five

claim: it's economic determinism, too simplistic. response: material needs will take precedence over others as long as there is scarcity but that doesn't mean the others don't exist?

/
107

Chapter Five

claim: it's economic determinism, too simplistic. response: material needs will take precedence over others as long as there is scarcity but that doesn't mean the others don't exist?

/
128

Chapter Six

claim: something about it not being spiritual enough? response: actually, socialism will free us

/
128

Chapter Six

claim: something about it not being spiritual enough? response: actually, socialism will free us

/
160

Chapter Seven

claim: class is an outdated concept. response: there are other important things but class is fundamental as long as we have capitalism

/
160

Chapter Seven

claim: class is an outdated concept. response: there are other important things but class is fundamental as long as we have capitalism

/
179

Chapter Eight

claim: too violent. response: only cus the established order resists

/
179

Chapter Eight

claim: too violent. response: only cus the established order resists

/
196

Chapter Nine

claim: the state would be too powerful. response: it doesn't have to be; Marx wanted it to "wither away". plus what's the diff (threat-wise) between an all-powerful monopoly corporation vs a state, except that the state is at least nominally accountable to the people? (though actually the state theoretically has legitimacy in terms of violence and its claim to be "for the people", so think about this more idk)

/
196

Chapter Nine

claim: the state would be too powerful. response: it doesn't have to be; Marx wanted it to "wither away". plus what's the diff (threat-wise) between an all-powerful monopoly corporation vs a state, except that the state is at least nominally accountable to the people? (though actually the state theoretically has legitimacy in terms of violence and its claim to be "for the people", so think about this more idk)

/
211

Chapter Ten

claim: kind of a rehash of 7; that class is an antiquated concept. response: class struggle is still entwined with all the others so we have to keep working on it

/
211

Chapter Ten

claim: kind of a rehash of 7; that class is an antiquated concept. response: class struggle is still entwined with all the others so we have to keep working on it

/

The Function of Criticism
by multiple authors

View terms by Terry Eagleton (20)
p.9
ukase »
an edict of the Russian government OR an arbitr...
p.20
ineluctable »
unable to be resisted or avoided; inescapable
p.21
minatory »
(adjective) having a menacing quality; threatening
p.21
eirenic »
tending to promote peace or reconciliation; pea...
p.22
pellucid »
translucently clear
View notes by Terry Eagleton (1)
Raymond Williams on Labour and culture
Responding to an enquiry about his cultural perspec­tives...