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78

Is life what you make it?

6
terms
2
notes

on Aristotle, and inequality, and individual/common answers to the question

Eagleton, T. (2007). Is life what you make it?. In Eagleton, T. The Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press, USA, pp. 78-186

(verb) to offer as example, reason, or proof in discussion or analysis

80

and adduces Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus in its defence

—p.80 by Terry Eagleton
confirm
3 years, 2 months ago

and adduces Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus in its defence

—p.80 by Terry Eagleton
confirm
3 years, 2 months ago
89

As for wealth, we live in a civilization which piously denies that it is an end in itself, and treats it exactly this way in practice. One of the most powerful indictments of capitalism is that it compels us to invest most of our creative energies in matters which are in fact purely utilitarian. The means of life become the end. Life consists in laying the material infrastructure for living. It is astonishing that in the twenty-first century, the material organization of life should bulk as large as it did in the Stone Age. The capital which might be devoted to releasing men and women, at least to some moderate degree, from the exigencies of labour is dedicated instead to the task of amassing more capital.

good quote

relevant to drift

—p.89 by Terry Eagleton 3 years, 2 months ago

As for wealth, we live in a civilization which piously denies that it is an end in itself, and treats it exactly this way in practice. One of the most powerful indictments of capitalism is that it compels us to invest most of our creative energies in matters which are in fact purely utilitarian. The means of life become the end. Life consists in laying the material infrastructure for living. It is astonishing that in the twenty-first century, the material organization of life should bulk as large as it did in the Stone Age. The capital which might be devoted to releasing men and women, at least to some moderate degree, from the exigencies of labour is dedicated instead to the task of amassing more capital.

good quote

relevant to drift

—p.89 by Terry Eagleton 3 years, 2 months ago

physical or intellectual pleasure, delight, or ecstasy; the concept featured heavily in the psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan's and was expanded on by Roland Barthes for literary theory, to contrast with mere "pleasure" derived from reading texts that don't challenge the reader as a subject. can also refer to pleasure that devolves into pain

91

The frantic jouissance of seizing the day, gathering rosebuds, downing an extra glass, and living like there’s no tomorrow is a desperate strategy for outwitting death, one which seeks pointlessly to cheat it rather than to make something of it.

—p.91 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago

The frantic jouissance of seizing the day, gathering rosebuds, downing an extra glass, and living like there’s no tomorrow is a desperate strategy for outwitting death, one which seeks pointlessly to cheat it rather than to make something of it.

—p.91 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago

(noun) a Greco-Christian term referring to "love: the highest form of love, charity", and "the love of God for man and of man for God

95

This kind of activity is known as agape, or love, and has nothing to do with erotic or even affectionate feelings.

—p.95 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago

This kind of activity is known as agape, or love, and has nothing to do with erotic or even affectionate feelings.

—p.95 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago

(noun) an intimate and often exclusive group of persons with a unifying common interest or purpose

95

It takes the meaning-of-life question out of the hands of a coterie of adepts or cognoscenti and returns it to the routine business of everyday existence.

—p.95 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago

It takes the meaning-of-life question out of the hands of a coterie of adepts or cognoscenti and returns it to the routine business of everyday existence.

—p.95 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago

(noun) a person who has expert knowledge in a subject; connoisseur

95

It takes the meaning-of-life question out of the hands of a coterie of adepts or cognoscenti and returns it to the routine business of everyday existence.

—p.95 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago

It takes the meaning-of-life question out of the hands of a coterie of adepts or cognoscenti and returns it to the routine business of everyday existence.

—p.95 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago
100

Is jazz, then, the meaning of life? Not exactly. The goal would be to construct this kind of community on a wider scale, which is a problem of politics. It is, to be sure, a utopian aspiration, but it is none the worse for that. The point of such aspirations is to indicate a direction, however lamentably we are bound to fall short of the goal. What we need is a form of life which is completely pointless, just as the jazz performance is pointless. Rather than serve some utilitarian purpose or earnest metaphysical end, it is a delight in itself. It needs no justification beyond its own existence. In this sense, the meaning of life is interestingly close to meaninglessness. Religious believers who find this version of the meaning of life a little too laid-back for comfort should remind themselves that God, too, is his own end, ground, origin, reason, and self-delight, and that only by living this way can human beings be said to share in his life. Believers sometimes speak as though a key difference between themselves and non-believers is that for them, the meaning and purpose of life lie outside it. But this is not quite true even for believers. For classical theology, God transcends the world, but figures as a depth within it. As Wittgenstein remarks somewhere: if there is such a thing as eternal life, it must be here and now. It is the present moment which is an image of eternity, not an infinite succession of such moments.

—p.100 by Terry Eagleton 3 years, 2 months ago

Is jazz, then, the meaning of life? Not exactly. The goal would be to construct this kind of community on a wider scale, which is a problem of politics. It is, to be sure, a utopian aspiration, but it is none the worse for that. The point of such aspirations is to indicate a direction, however lamentably we are bound to fall short of the goal. What we need is a form of life which is completely pointless, just as the jazz performance is pointless. Rather than serve some utilitarian purpose or earnest metaphysical end, it is a delight in itself. It needs no justification beyond its own existence. In this sense, the meaning of life is interestingly close to meaninglessness. Religious believers who find this version of the meaning of life a little too laid-back for comfort should remind themselves that God, too, is his own end, ground, origin, reason, and self-delight, and that only by living this way can human beings be said to share in his life. Believers sometimes speak as though a key difference between themselves and non-believers is that for them, the meaning and purpose of life lie outside it. But this is not quite true even for believers. For classical theology, God transcends the world, but figures as a depth within it. As Wittgenstein remarks somewhere: if there is such a thing as eternal life, it must be here and now. It is the present moment which is an image of eternity, not an infinite succession of such moments.

—p.100 by Terry Eagleton 3 years, 2 months ago

the act of enhancing or exaggerating one's own importance, power, or reputation

100

There is achievement, but it is not a question of self-aggrandizing success.

—p.100 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago

There is achievement, but it is not a question of self-aggrandizing success.

—p.100 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 2 months ago