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30

Chapter Three

3
terms
2
notes

claim: too deterministic. response: institutional/structural factors still leave room for individual action

Eagleton, T. (2011). Chapter Three. In Eagleton, T. Why Marx Was Right. Yale University Press, pp. 30-63

a discourse between two or more people holding different points of view about a subject but wishing to establish the truth through reasoned arguments

41

Modernity is not meant to be mindlessly celebrated, but neither is it to be disdainfully dismissed. Its positive and negative qualities are for the most part aspects of the same process. This is why only a dialectical approach, one which grasps how contradiction is of its essence, can do it justice.

—p.41 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 5 months ago

Modernity is not meant to be mindlessly celebrated, but neither is it to be disdainfully dismissed. Its positive and negative qualities are for the most part aspects of the same process. This is why only a dialectical approach, one which grasps how contradiction is of its essence, can do it justice.

—p.41 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 5 months ago
43

The class struggle is essentially a struggle over the surplus, and as such it is likely to continue as long as there is not a sufficiency for all. Class comes about whenever material production is so organised as to compel some individuals to transfer their surplus labour to others in order to survive. When there is little or no surplus, as in so-called primitive communism, everyone has to work, nobody can live off the toil of others, so there can be no classes. [...]

or even long after there is

—p.43 by Terry Eagleton 3 years, 5 months ago

The class struggle is essentially a struggle over the surplus, and as such it is likely to continue as long as there is not a sufficiency for all. Class comes about whenever material production is so organised as to compel some individuals to transfer their surplus labour to others in order to survive. When there is little or no surplus, as in so-called primitive communism, everyone has to work, nobody can live off the toil of others, so there can be no classes. [...]

or even long after there is

—p.43 by Terry Eagleton 3 years, 5 months ago

(noun) defensive wall

48

Social democracy is one bulwark between itself and disaster.

—p.48 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 5 months ago

Social democracy is one bulwark between itself and disaster.

—p.48 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 5 months ago
57

[...] the need for capitalism in order to have socialism. Driven by self-interest, ruthless competition and the need for ceaseless expansion, only capitalism is capable of developing the productive forces to the point where, under a different political dispensation, the surplus they generate can be used to furnish a sufficiency for all. To have socialism, you must first have capitalism. Or rather, you may not need to have capitalism, but somebody must. [...]

—p.57 by Terry Eagleton 3 years, 5 months ago

[...] the need for capitalism in order to have socialism. Driven by self-interest, ruthless competition and the need for ceaseless expansion, only capitalism is capable of developing the productive forces to the point where, under a different political dispensation, the surplus they generate can be used to furnish a sufficiency for all. To have socialism, you must first have capitalism. Or rather, you may not need to have capitalism, but somebody must. [...]

—p.57 by Terry Eagleton 3 years, 5 months ago

the philosophical attempt to describe things in terms of their apparent intrinsic purpose, directive principle, or goal, irrespective of human use or opinion

59

Marx's theory of history is not a "teleological" one. A teleological theory holds that each phase of history arises inexorably from what went before.

—p.59 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 5 months ago

Marx's theory of history is not a "teleological" one. A teleological theory holds that each phase of history arises inexorably from what went before.

—p.59 by Terry Eagleton
notable
3 years, 5 months ago