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This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

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50

Durban Dockers, Labor Internationalism, and Pan-Africanism

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Cole, P. (2018). Durban Dockers, Labor Internationalism, and Pan-Africanism. In Ness, I. and Alimahomed-Wilson, J. (eds) Choke Points: Logistics Workers Disrupting the Global Supply Chain. Pluto Press, pp. 50-66

51

Dockworkers are quite international-minded, more inclined than most to see local struggles in larger contexts due to the nature of shipping -- moving goods, people, and information around the seven seas. Dockers interpret their work and world through a global lens. In Durban and many other ports, they deploy their power to advance internationalist, anti-authoritarian ideals. Global labor historian Marcel van der Linden uses the term "labour internationalism" for actions like the one described above, and defines it as "the collective actions of a group of workers in one country who set aside their short-term interests as a national group on behalf of a group of workers in another country, in order to promote their long-term interests as members of a transnational class." In doing so, they challenge the notion that workers are powerless to shape the world.

—p.51 by Peter Cole 1 week, 2 days ago

Dockworkers are quite international-minded, more inclined than most to see local struggles in larger contexts due to the nature of shipping -- moving goods, people, and information around the seven seas. Dockers interpret their work and world through a global lens. In Durban and many other ports, they deploy their power to advance internationalist, anti-authoritarian ideals. Global labor historian Marcel van der Linden uses the term "labour internationalism" for actions like the one described above, and defines it as "the collective actions of a group of workers in one country who set aside their short-term interests as a national group on behalf of a group of workers in another country, in order to promote their long-term interests as members of a transnational class." In doing so, they challenge the notion that workers are powerless to shape the world.

—p.51 by Peter Cole 1 week, 2 days ago