Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

35

Across the Chain: Labor and Conflicts in the European Maritime Logistics Sector

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Bottalico, A. (2018). Across the Chain: Labor and Conflicts in the European Maritime Logistics Sector. In Ness, I. and Alimahomed-Wilson, J. (eds) Choke Points: Logistics Workers Disrupting the Global Supply Chain. Pluto Press, pp. 35-49

44

The real force of economic globalisation is the declining cost of international transport -- and the same force is moving the inshoring process. In the maritime leg of the logistics chain, a Greek owned vessel, built in Korea, may be chartered to a Danish operator, who employs Filipino seafarers via a Cypriot crewing agent, is registered in Panama, insured in the United Kingdom [...] it is cheaper to ship freshly caught fish from the West Coast of the United States to China to be deboned and filleted by Chinese workers and then shipped back again, than it is to pay for the cost of that work under US labor regulations. Liberalization and globalization of the maritime industry has led to a reduction in transport costs.

this is mad

—p.44 by Andrea Bottalico 1 week, 2 days ago

The real force of economic globalisation is the declining cost of international transport -- and the same force is moving the inshoring process. In the maritime leg of the logistics chain, a Greek owned vessel, built in Korea, may be chartered to a Danish operator, who employs Filipino seafarers via a Cypriot crewing agent, is registered in Panama, insured in the United Kingdom [...] it is cheaper to ship freshly caught fish from the West Coast of the United States to China to be deboned and filleted by Chinese workers and then shipped back again, than it is to pay for the cost of that work under US labor regulations. Liberalization and globalization of the maritime industry has led to a reduction in transport costs.

this is mad

—p.44 by Andrea Bottalico 1 week, 2 days ago