Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

9

Equality, not competition or hierarchy, is 'the mother of invention'. Progress slows or goes into reverse as soon as ideas are appropriated by hierarchical organizations. Inequality is sustained when a few people persuade the majority that there is no alternative. [...]

not sure if the Thatcher reference is intentional or not but it's great

—p.9 Introduction (11) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago

Equality, not competition or hierarchy, is 'the mother of invention'. Progress slows or goes into reverse as soon as ideas are appropriated by hierarchical organizations. Inequality is sustained when a few people persuade the majority that there is no alternative. [...]

not sure if the Thatcher reference is intentional or not but it's great

—p.9 Introduction (11) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago
10

All societies that become greatly unequal eventually fail to adapt technologically and become unsustainable. [...] When inequality rises, you pour more and more resources into your armies and into new technology for them--not into truly productive and co-operative purposes. Slaves and scribes are left to do the hard work. Eventually the empire falls--because high and rising inequality and a consequent lack of innovation and adaptation is how it so often ends.

We can see this end coming. It is not too late to learn and change. And technology can help us do this if we better understand it--and ourselves.

—p.10 Foreword (6) by Danny Dorling 1 year ago

All societies that become greatly unequal eventually fail to adapt technologically and become unsustainable. [...] When inequality rises, you pour more and more resources into your armies and into new technology for them--not into truly productive and co-operative purposes. Slaves and scribes are left to do the hard work. Eventually the empire falls--because high and rising inequality and a consequent lack of innovation and adaptation is how it so often ends.

We can see this end coming. It is not too late to learn and change. And technology can help us do this if we better understand it--and ourselves.

—p.10 Foreword (6) by Danny Dorling 1 year ago
11

[...] 'Technology' often implicitly refers to something you are expected to turn over to 'the guys who understand it'.

great quote. from Ted Nelson's self-published book Computer Lib, apparently a foundational text for the hacker movement (why haven't I heard of it????)

—p.11 Introduction (11) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago

[...] 'Technology' often implicitly refers to something you are expected to turn over to 'the guys who understand it'.

great quote. from Ted Nelson's self-published book Computer Lib, apparently a foundational text for the hacker movement (why haven't I heard of it????)

—p.11 Introduction (11) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago
17

The frequent claim that inequality promotes accumulation and growth does not get much support from history. On the contrary, great economic inequality has always been correlated with extreme concentration of political power, and that power has always been used to widen the income gaps through rent-seeking and rent-keeping, forces that demonstrably retard economic growth.

citation: "Measuring Ancient Inequality" (a paper)

—p.17 Technofatalism and the future--is a world without Foxconn even possible? (15) by Branko Milanović 1 year ago

The frequent claim that inequality promotes accumulation and growth does not get much support from history. On the contrary, great economic inequality has always been correlated with extreme concentration of political power, and that power has always been used to widen the income gaps through rent-seeking and rent-keeping, forces that demonstrably retard economic growth.

citation: "Measuring Ancient Inequality" (a paper)

—p.17 Technofatalism and the future--is a world without Foxconn even possible? (15) by Branko Milanović 1 year ago
24

A key part of any Utopian project should be to discuss widely and think deeply about the human natures we want to have and the ones we do not want to have, and to devise the kinds of social arrangements that will support and reward those characteristics.

—p.24 Technofatalism and the future--is a world without Foxconn even possible? (15) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago

A key part of any Utopian project should be to discuss widely and think deeply about the human natures we want to have and the ones we do not want to have, and to devise the kinds of social arrangements that will support and reward those characteristics.

—p.24 Technofatalism and the future--is a world without Foxconn even possible? (15) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago
51

[...] Demand for large, luxury cars fell abruptly; labor historian Rob Rooke records that demand fell steadily from 150,000 sold in 1929 to only 10,000 a year by 1937. Perhaps this was because it no longer felt right to drive in luxury when people were starving, and perhaps, following rumored or actual attacks on wealthy limousine-owners, rich people suddenly felt 'that ostentatious displays of wealth could cost them their lives'.

BRING THIS BACK

change the attitude of one group to change the behaviour of another

—p.51 From water mills to iPhones: why technology and inequality do not mix (46) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago

[...] Demand for large, luxury cars fell abruptly; labor historian Rob Rooke records that demand fell steadily from 150,000 sold in 1929 to only 10,000 a year by 1937. Perhaps this was because it no longer felt right to drive in luxury when people were starving, and perhaps, following rumored or actual attacks on wealthy limousine-owners, rich people suddenly felt 'that ostentatious displays of wealth could cost them their lives'.

BRING THIS BACK

change the attitude of one group to change the behaviour of another

—p.51 From water mills to iPhones: why technology and inequality do not mix (46) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago
65

[...] unequal societies have a short-term competitive edge over more egalitarian ones because those who take the decisions do not have to suffer their consequences. Rogers writes: 'unequal societies are better able to survive resource shortages by sequestering mortality in the lower classes'. In the longer term, however, these societies can only survive by proliferation--finding fresh populations to bear the burdens they create. [...]

citing Deborah Rogers (Stanford)

—p.65 From water mills to iPhones: why technology and inequality do not mix (46) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago

[...] unequal societies have a short-term competitive edge over more egalitarian ones because those who take the decisions do not have to suffer their consequences. Rogers writes: 'unequal societies are better able to survive resource shortages by sequestering mortality in the lower classes'. In the longer term, however, these societies can only survive by proliferation--finding fresh populations to bear the burdens they create. [...]

citing Deborah Rogers (Stanford)

—p.65 From water mills to iPhones: why technology and inequality do not mix (46) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago
127

Positionality is a valuable concept for anyone who is interested in making society more fair, because it highlights the fact that the system is not composed entirely of people who believe in it and want it, but perhaps very largely of people who have been dragooned into it and would love to be free of it. This may even be true of some members of the rich elite. [...]

referring to positional luxury goods (Veblen goods?)

—p.127 The invisible foot: why inequality increases impact (123) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago

Positionality is a valuable concept for anyone who is interested in making society more fair, because it highlights the fact that the system is not composed entirely of people who believe in it and want it, but perhaps very largely of people who have been dragooned into it and would love to be free of it. This may even be true of some members of the rich elite. [...]

referring to positional luxury goods (Veblen goods?)

—p.127 The invisible foot: why inequality increases impact (123) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago
157

[...] the publication in 1973 of Fischer Black and Myron Scholes's algorithm for the pricing of options.

Before Black and Scholes's work, derivatives had been a small fraction of all investments, essentially the contracts known as 'futures,' [...] Black and Scholes's algorithm allowed almost everything else to be priced the same way, including personal debt. It was what made the 'hedge fund' possible, and a world economy in which financial assets completely eclipsed the real ones that they supposedly represented. [...]

something to remember

—p.157 Enclosure in the computer age: the magic of control (146) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago

[...] the publication in 1973 of Fischer Black and Myron Scholes's algorithm for the pricing of options.

Before Black and Scholes's work, derivatives had been a small fraction of all investments, essentially the contracts known as 'futures,' [...] Black and Scholes's algorithm allowed almost everything else to be priced the same way, including personal debt. It was what made the 'hedge fund' possible, and a world economy in which financial assets completely eclipsed the real ones that they supposedly represented. [...]

something to remember

—p.157 Enclosure in the computer age: the magic of control (146) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago
158

The power-shift towards finance became self-reinforcing. Financial institutions deployed their increased lobbying power successfully against the legal barriers between speculative and retail banking [...] This drew creative effort and investment into the monetary system itself, and away from the productive economy for which monetary systems in theory exist.

referring, obviously, to Glass-Steagall (introduced 1933; repealed 1999)

—p.158 Enclosure in the computer age: the magic of control (146) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago

The power-shift towards finance became self-reinforcing. Financial institutions deployed their increased lobbying power successfully against the legal barriers between speculative and retail banking [...] This drew creative effort and investment into the monetary system itself, and away from the productive economy for which monetary systems in theory exist.

referring, obviously, to Glass-Steagall (introduced 1933; repealed 1999)

—p.158 Enclosure in the computer age: the magic of control (146) by Bob Hughes 1 year ago