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This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

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46

From water mills to iPhones: why technology and inequality do not mix

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Hughes, B. (2016). From water mills to iPhones: why technology and inequality do not mix. In Hughes, B. The Bleeding Edge: Why Technology Turns Toxic in an Unequal World. New Internationalist, pp. 46-72

51

[...] Demand for large, luxury cars fell abruptly; labor historian Rob Rooke records that demand fell steadily from 150,000 sold in 1929 to only 10,000 a year by 1937. Perhaps this was because it no longer felt right to drive in luxury when people were starving, and perhaps, following rumored or actual attacks on wealthy limousine-owners, rich people suddenly felt 'that ostentatious displays of wealth could cost them their lives'.

BRING THIS BACK

change the attitude of one group to change the behaviour of another

default author 9 months, 2 weeks ago

[...] Demand for large, luxury cars fell abruptly; labor historian Rob Rooke records that demand fell steadily from 150,000 sold in 1929 to only 10,000 a year by 1937. Perhaps this was because it no longer felt right to drive in luxury when people were starving, and perhaps, following rumored or actual attacks on wealthy limousine-owners, rich people suddenly felt 'that ostentatious displays of wealth could cost them their lives'.

BRING THIS BACK

change the attitude of one group to change the behaviour of another

—p.51 default author 9 months, 2 weeks ago
65

[...] unequal societies have a short-term competitive edge over more egalitarian ones because those who take the decisions do not have to suffer their consequences. Rogers writes: 'unequal societies are better able to survive resource shortages by sequestering mortality in the lower classes'. In the longer term, however, these societies can only survive by proliferation--finding fresh populations to bear the burdens they create. [...]

citing Deborah Rogers (Stanford)

default author 9 months, 2 weeks ago

[...] unequal societies have a short-term competitive edge over more egalitarian ones because those who take the decisions do not have to suffer their consequences. Rogers writes: 'unequal societies are better able to survive resource shortages by sequestering mortality in the lower classes'. In the longer term, however, these societies can only survive by proliferation--finding fresh populations to bear the burdens they create. [...]

citing Deborah Rogers (Stanford)

—p.65 default author 9 months, 2 weeks ago