Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

3

The balance scale, I argue, was the image to which he kept returning for reconciliation of his varied ambitions, beginning from his naming of his first protagonist--an LB--after a standard unit of weight, money, and work (from the Latin libra, balance) and continuing through his romancing of IRS balance sheets.

this feels kinda BS to me

—p.3 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

The balance scale, I argue, was the image to which he kept returning for reconciliation of his varied ambitions, beginning from his naming of his first protagonist--an LB--after a standard unit of weight, money, and work (from the Latin libra, balance) and continuing through his romancing of IRS balance sheets.

this feels kinda BS to me

—p.3 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
7

[...] Wallace also argues that literary texts are ideally engaged with proving existence: Markson's Wittgenstein's Mistress should have been titled "I EXIST", which Wallace says is the "signal that throbs under most voluntary writing--& all good writing" [...]

why I write! see note 83

—p.7 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] Wallace also argues that literary texts are ideally engaged with proving existence: Markson's Wittgenstein's Mistress should have been titled "I EXIST", which Wallace says is the "signal that throbs under most voluntary writing--& all good writing" [...]

why I write! see note 83

—p.7 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
22

Unlike Pynchon, however, Wallace does not wish to dump the legacy of Calvinism; he seeks to build fictions around work and the fervent call to work, an activity he recurrently sees not just in terms of the labor theory of value but, through the lens of Hegel, as the only way of creating a fully viable self. Whether through an executive washroom attendant, diligent cruise-ship workers, or an actuary who dies prematurely of a heart attack, Wallace consistently makes work heroic and tragic, its lack, avoidance, or meaninglessness a sign of his most lost, and, in the realm of laborless capitalist value extraction, most evil figures. Absorption in work seems to be a reliable antidote to depression and feelings of worthlessness. Hegel's bondsman is a recurrent trope, as is metaphysical slavery in general.

need to think about this more FLAG

—p.22 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

Unlike Pynchon, however, Wallace does not wish to dump the legacy of Calvinism; he seeks to build fictions around work and the fervent call to work, an activity he recurrently sees not just in terms of the labor theory of value but, through the lens of Hegel, as the only way of creating a fully viable self. Whether through an executive washroom attendant, diligent cruise-ship workers, or an actuary who dies prematurely of a heart attack, Wallace consistently makes work heroic and tragic, its lack, avoidance, or meaninglessness a sign of his most lost, and, in the realm of laborless capitalist value extraction, most evil figures. Absorption in work seems to be a reliable antidote to depression and feelings of worthlessness. Hegel's bondsman is a recurrent trope, as is metaphysical slavery in general.

need to think about this more FLAG

—p.22 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
23

The denigration of work, the celebration of efficiency, and the worship of the market are all hallmarks of the ideology that has dominated the United States since the late 1970s, neoliberalism. [...] At his most political, Wallace chronicles the long-term infiltration of neoliberal ideology into the American and global scene. Reagan's union busting plays a role in my analysis of Broom, and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) figures in Infinite Jest, which repeatedly makes ideas of freedom and trade, those neoliberal bywords, cross from political and economic spheres to the complexly interpersonal.

mildly interesting

—p.23 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

The denigration of work, the celebration of efficiency, and the worship of the market are all hallmarks of the ideology that has dominated the United States since the late 1970s, neoliberalism. [...] At his most political, Wallace chronicles the long-term infiltration of neoliberal ideology into the American and global scene. Reagan's union busting plays a role in my analysis of Broom, and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) figures in Infinite Jest, which repeatedly makes ideas of freedom and trade, those neoliberal bywords, cross from political and economic spheres to the complexly interpersonal.

mildly interesting

—p.23 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
25

Wallace weds to the perspective of Hardt and Negri a Wittgensteinian awareness that there can be no metaphor capacious enough to capture language's operations.

just thought this was a nice sentence

—p.25 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

Wallace weds to the perspective of Hardt and Negri a Wittgensteinian awareness that there can be no metaphor capacious enough to capture language's operations.

just thought this was a nice sentence

—p.25 Introduction: A Living Transaction (1) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
41

[...] the drug's use of "cattle-endocrine derivative" (B 149) suggests, via the etymological links between cattle and capital the making of humans themselves into pliable capital.

is it just me or is this total BS? not only is it probably unintentionally, it's hard to see it as anything more than a coincidence

—p.41 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] the drug's use of "cattle-endocrine derivative" (B 149) suggests, via the etymological links between cattle and capital the making of humans themselves into pliable capital.

is it just me or is this total BS? not only is it probably unintentionally, it's hard to see it as anything more than a coincidence

—p.41 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
46

Rick's R.V. initials [...] translate to random variable in mathematical parlance, whereas Lenore often has the qualities of a constant.

two questions. 1) did DFW intend this and 2) does it even MATTER (i.e., does it add to the extraction of meaning from the text in any way or is it all BS)

—p.46 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

Rick's R.V. initials [...] translate to random variable in mathematical parlance, whereas Lenore often has the qualities of a constant.

two questions. 1) did DFW intend this and 2) does it even MATTER (i.e., does it add to the extraction of meaning from the text in any way or is it all BS)

—p.46 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
50

The Stonecipheco minion Neil Obstat Jr., meanwhile, is named for the phrase of papal censorship, nihil obstat ("nothing hinders"), in a corollary to legalistic control over language.

ok this is why I read lit crit shit like this. i wouldn't have caught this reference myself

—p.50 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

The Stonecipheco minion Neil Obstat Jr., meanwhile, is named for the phrase of papal censorship, nihil obstat ("nothing hinders"), in a corollary to legalistic control over language.

ok this is why I read lit crit shit like this. i wouldn't have caught this reference myself

—p.50 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
55

N.R.K., Keller's initials, together sound like "anarchy", and this order that philosophy might bring to this nervous boy should allow him to grow up, or somehow rise (keller is German for basement).

I think this whole sentence is utter BS

—p.55 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

N.R.K., Keller's initials, together sound like "anarchy", and this order that philosophy might bring to this nervous boy should allow him to grow up, or somehow rise (keller is German for basement).

I think this whole sentence is utter BS

—p.55 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago
59

[...] the open-ended, state-run lottery is a salutary vision: in losing week after week, Lenore is actually paying into a civic fund that is not unlike taxes, a fund of commonwealth that the young Wallace tentatively steps toward here. Many U.S. lotteries have historically been legally set up to support states' public-education systems, another sign of Lenore's involvement with learning (though increasingly such claims about state lotteries are truthless advertising).

1) taxes are at least supposed to be a lot more progressive than lottery systems

2) this is so irrelevant and thus BS it's not even funny

—p.59 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago

[...] the open-ended, state-run lottery is a salutary vision: in losing week after week, Lenore is actually paying into a civic fund that is not unlike taxes, a fund of commonwealth that the young Wallace tentatively steps toward here. Many U.S. lotteries have historically been legally set up to support states' public-education systems, another sign of Lenore's involvement with learning (though increasingly such claims about state lotteries are truthless advertising).

1) taxes are at least supposed to be a lot more progressive than lottery systems

2) this is so irrelevant and thus BS it's not even funny

—p.59 Come to Work (33) by Jeffrey Severs 1 year, 6 months ago