Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

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6 years, 8 months ago

they rescue us from our death why/read

What do writers do when they seriously notice the world? Perhaps they do nothing less than rescue the life of things from their death--from two deaths, one small and one large: from the 'death' which literary form always threatens to impose on life, and from actual death. Which is to say, they resc…

—p.53 The Nearest Thing To Life Serious Noticing (29) by James Wood
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6 years, 8 months ago

fiction's chief difference topic/literary-theory

[...] fiction's chief difference from poetry and painting and sculpture--from the other arts of noticing--is this internal psychological element. In fiction, we get to examine the self in all its performance and pretence, its fear and secret ambition, its pride and sadness. It is by noticing people…

—p.51 Serious Noticing (29) by James Wood
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6 years, 8 months ago

that magical fusion topic/literary-theory

[...] For details represent those moments in a story where form is outlived, cancelled, evaded. I think of details as nothing less than bits of life sticking out of the frieze of form, imploring us to touch them. Details are not, of course, just bits of life: they represent that magical fusion, w…

—p.36 Serious Noticing (29) by James Wood
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6 years, 8 months ago

the writer is God Himself

Nabokov's is a highly self-serving and romantic view of the author, who seems to have no indebtedness to any other author; indeed, in Nabokov's mythology, this writer, who fashions humans from ribs, is God Himself, which might well mean Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov.

—p.56 Serious Noticing (29) by James Wood
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6 years, 8 months ago

at least three languages topic/literary-theory

So the novelist is always working with at least three languages. There is the author's own language, style, perceptual equipment, and so on; there is the character's presumed language, style, perceptual equipment, and so on; and there is what we could call the language of the world—the language tha…

—p.28 How Fiction Works Narrating (5) by James Wood