Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

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You edited a note
13 hours ago

their deaths happened long before misc/poetry

their deaths happened long
Before. It happened in the minds of people who never saw Them. It happened in the profit margins. It happened In the laws. They died because money could be saved and made.

—p.224 A Place to Call Home (221) missing author
You edited a note
13 hours ago

you’re supposed to thank the fumes misc/poetry

You’re supposed to thank the fumes. To be grateful
for the toxic patch on the rail track.
For the craquelure
in the asphalt, seeping green—
it reroutes you, proffers with each commute a forced
adventure. Who’s to say what you’ll find
in your course of avoidance?
Ideally a willi…

—p.35 [You're supposed to thank the fumes. To be grateful] (35) by Chris Lehmann
You edited a note
14 hours ago

all the hours stolen for gas bills misc/poetry

[...] And, friends
It is rotten, to have had history pull you up and spit you
Out again, for a few good moments, for nothing more
Than debt and waged servitude, all the hours stolen for gas bills,
Their world not built for you, its monstrous incursions
Of spectacular boredom, the she…

—p.158 On Defeat (158) missing author
You edited a note
16 hours ago

we are a defeated people inspo/anti-capitalism

I took my son to see it. I wanted him to know something of the origins and motivations of a structure of feeling that was something that I once felt deeply and to which I will remain in solidarity for the rest of my life. Let us admit, comrades, that we are a defeated people. There will be no secon…

—p.169 by McKenzie Wark
You edited a note
3 days, 16 hours ago

the current period of globalisation

At a high level of abstraction, the current period of globalisation is defined by a trilogy of ideal-typical economies: superindustrial (coastal East Asia), financial/tertiary (North Atlantic), and hyperurbanizing/extractive (West Africa). "Jobless growth" is incipient in the first, chronic in the …

—p.10 Old Gods, New Enigmas (7) by Mike Davis
You edited a note
3 days, 16 hours ago

the market leaves the public sector to fill the gap

How will a carbon price build a network of electric-vehicle, fast-charging stations? Tesla only builds them in cherry-picked areas where it can rely on profits. Like a private bus company or an internet provider, Elon Musk won’t provide a service where that doesn’t make money. The market leaves the…

—p.134 Planning the Good Anthropocene (133) by Leigh Phillips
You edited a note
3 days, 16 hours ago

what is profitable is not always useful

What is profitable is not always useful, and what is useful is not always profitable. Worse still, many things that undermine human flourishing or even threaten our existence remain profitable, and, without regulatory intervention, companies will continue to produce them.

This — the market’s pro…

—p.133 Planning the Good Anthropocene (133) by Leigh Phillips
You edited a note
3 days, 16 hours ago

the achievement of the market consensus

The achievement of the market consensus was to produce a mental world in which alternatives to capitalism did not seem conceivable - much less attainable. The key, it seems, was to make the principle of rapacity and plunder into a new catechism for economic policymaking, and then to watch our cultu…

—p.2 Introduction (1) by Chris Lehmann, John Summers, Thomas Frank
You edited a note
3 days, 16 hours ago

this kind of criticism is the hardest thing

Criticism bearing our abrasive tone and uncompromising stance is sometimes derided as lowdown or (worse yet) easy. But the truth is, this kind of criticism is the hardest thing in the world to produce if you happen to live in a culture ruled by the dicta of positive thinking and dread of the existe…

—p.5 Introduction (1) by Chris Lehmann, John Summers, Thomas Frank
You added a note
4 days, 12 hours ago

capital manipulates the immigration question

[...] capital manipulates the immigration question. For if capital is no longer concerned with securing an immigration flow, it has every reason to exploit immigration as a source of division within the working class. It is not hypocrisy for Donald Trump to both provoke anti-immigrant sentiment whi…

—p.37 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
4 days, 12 hours ago

a kind of trickle-down economics of the Left

[...] In the past thirty years, mass migration to the US reached levels unseen for a century, and those thirty years have not been a period of prosperity and wage growth for the working class, but the opposite. For those American workers who have experienced declining wages, long periods of unemplo…

—p.36 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
4 days, 12 hours ago

racial animus or material anxiety?

Will a call for open borders inevitably alienate native workers?

The answer to that question will differ depending on what we think ultimately drives the nativist reaction among the working class — racial animus or material anxiety. To be sure, both factors are necessary to understanding how ant…

—p.31 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
4 days, 12 hours ago

the right to be present in a country is a precondition

[...] Formally speaking, all immigrant workers, legally authorized or otherwise, have most of the same labor protections and rights to participate in workplace organizing as native workers. Substantively, the right to be present in a country is a precondition for securing all other rights. Even if …

—p.28 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
4 days, 12 hours ago

capital will not support open borders

Under the current system, then, even employers in sectors that rely on immigrant labor have little to lose from immigration restriction policies. We have built fences and walls, militarized the border, and imprisoned immigrants, without significantly impacting the availability of immigrant workers …

—p.27 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
4 days, 12 hours ago

American capital’s dependence on immigrant labor

[...] American capital’s dependence on immigrant labor in the nineteenth century is unique among industrializing countries, in that the process of colonization and settlement had resulted in patterns of yeoman farming, rather than feudal agriculture, and thus lacked the reserves of surplus agricult…

—p.15 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
4 days, 18 hours ago

this boy had devoured Myers’ youth

t came to him that he didn’t want to see the boy, after all. He was shocked by this realization and for a moment felt diminished by the meanness of it. He shook his head. In a lifetime of foolish actions, this trip was possibly the most foolish thing he’d ever done. But the fact was, he really had …

—p.54 The Compartment (47) by Raymond Carver
You added a note
5 days, 6 hours ago

the two eras of US immigration policy

Immigration policy in the US can be very broadly broken down into two eras, demarcated roughly by the turn of the twentieth century, and distinguished by the state’s orientation towards immigration restriction. The first period, which stretches back to the colonial era, oversaw a generally open reg…

—p.14 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
5 days, 6 hours ago

all workers benefit when migrants are protected

[...] whatever native workers may fear about the intensified competition from new entrants to the labor market, with regard to the rights of the immigrants who enter the US, all workers benefit when those new workers are protected from employer despotism. Defending the rights of labor depends on la…

—p.13 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
5 days, 7 hours ago

how capital’s structural interests impact immigration policy

To properly assess how capital’s structural interests impact immigration policy, we need to begin with a conceptual distinction between questions of the immigration flow and questions of immigrants’ rights.6 There is, of course, a significant overlap and interaction between these two phenomena — th…

—p.11 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
5 days, 8 hours ago

why the national policy so weakly reflects the preferences

[...] most demonstrations of white nationalism are notable for how easily they are dwarfed by counter-protestors. The question we should be asking, then, is not how to get the working class to be less nativist, but to understand why the national policy so weakly reflects the preferences of the majo…

—p.10 The Case for Open Borders (7) missing author
You added a note
6 days, 5 hours ago

financialisation and the sharing economy

If the technology behind the sharing economy is not the source of its dominance, though, what is? "Financialization" may be the most relevant answer. "Finance, at its most basic level," writes the cultural critic Alison Shonkwiler, "is the domain in which value is less likely to be produced than …

—p.158 Share (156) by John Patrick Leary
You added a note
6 days, 5 hours ago

responsible for becoming more resilient

[...] NAFTA and American agribusiness are treated not as political circumstances but as metaphorical storms: since "we cannot control the volatile tides of change," they write," we can learn to build better boats." These examples are all part of a long tradition of naturalizing our contemporary pol…

—p.153 Robust (153) by John Patrick Leary
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6 days, 5 hours ago

Blair had missed the point of meritocracy

[...] As Young himself wrote in a 2001 essay deploring his term's enthusiastic adoption by the New Labour government of Tony Blair, that education had become a means of concentrating power. "It is good sense," he wrote, "to appoint individual people to jobs on their merit. It is the opposite when t…

—p.136 Meritocracy (135) by John Patrick Leary
You added a note
6 days, 5 hours ago

in terms of an actuarial calculation

[...] Another advantage to employers of treating education or health care as human capital development is that risk in labor markets can be outsourced to employees. Why train someone on the job when they might just leave and take their knowledge elsewhere? Why spend time and money teaching skills t…

—p.112 Human capital (110) by John Patrick Leary
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6 days, 5 hours ago

defying the odds is, by definition, improbable

[...] defying the odds is, by definition, improbable. And while it may work as advice in a business world predicated on competition, to fashion a democratic educational policy around the possibility of defying odds makes little sense. If everyone, or even many people, could defy the odds, then casi…

—p.103 Grit (100) by John Patrick Leary