Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

Activity

You added a note
1 day ago

within limits that they didn't make

[...] sociology is partly about how people's agency or free will is exercised within limits that they didn't make, and I think people can find that distasteful about sociology, that it can seem deterministic. [...]

—p.82 Panel 2 (59) missing author
You added a note
1 day ago

it's not bad to have regrets

[...] Nobody can get a proper undergraduate education. You'll never know in advance what that education should be. Regret is the feeling you have when you finally realize what the education is that you want. Right? And you're always going to come to that after it's too late. There is always going...

—p.64 Panel 2 (59) missing author
You added a note
1 week, 1 day ago

history is sedimented into the unconscious

How does the spectre of communism still haunt quite well-to-do people after long spells of centrist administration? Perhaps it isn't irrelevant that Brazil is a society built on racial slavery, where the class system is still powerfully structured by race. Brazil was one of the biggest consumers ...

—p.1 Anticommunism without communism by Richard Seymour
You added a note
1 week, 4 days ago

wages for housework as a strategy of refusal

Wages for Housework was misunderstood as saying, Give us money so we can stay home, doing the same domestic work. We actually saw wages for housework as a strategy of refusal, as a strategy giving us more options, more power to decide how to organize our lives. We were accused of “institutional...

—p.1 Every Woman Is a Working Woman by Silvia Federici
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1 week, 4 days ago

violence is always latent in the family

Our analysis of violence against women hinged on seeing housework as a form of capitalist production, and analyzing the role of the wage in constructing the whole family’s organization. We argued that violence is always latent in the family because, through the wage, the state delegates to the hu...

—p.1 Every Woman Is a Working Woman by Silvia Federici
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1 week, 4 days ago

every woman is a working woman fighting-words

The politics of Wages for Housework was shaped by women who had an understanding of capitalism, imperialism, and the anti-colonial struggle. Thus we could not accept that women’s liberation could be a struggle for “equality with men” or that it could be limited to equal pay for equal work. We sa...

—p.1 Every Woman Is a Working Woman by Silvia Federici
You added a note
1 week, 4 days ago

this is the only place I can afford to live

“What choice do I have?” ask the liberal gentrifiers, if you press them a bit. “This is the only place I can afford to live!” This sums everything up perfectly, puncturing the bubble of individual choices that make up liberal politics.

You have no choice; everything’s been decided ahead of tim...

—p.1 Liberalism and Gentrification by Gavin C Mueller
You added a note
1 week, 4 days ago

racism isn’t just a bad feeling in your heart

[...] Racism isn’t just a bad feeling in your heart, as a liberal believes when she insists that she isn’t at all racist. It’s a force that emerges from the pressures of maintaining one’s own position, and the resentments that spring forth from this process. It produces fear and hatred of the poo...

—p.1 Liberalism and Gentrification by Gavin C Mueller
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

it was bourgeois historians who invented the concept of class

[...] Marx’s famous 1852 letter to Weydemeyer (put to illuminating use in Andrea Cavalletti’s acute essay on class, which I’m currently editing), where he clearly states that it was not he who invented the concept of class, but rather bourgeois historians – and that his contribution was rather to...

—p.1 Alberto Toscano: Solidarity and Political Work by Alberto Toscano
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

the invisible ‘iceberg’ of exploitation

[...] it is important to learn how to discern the classed and anti-capitalist dimensions of what is sometimes misconceived reductively as ‘identity politics’. After all, how could the political movements and militant theorising of those whose labour and lives have been confiscated, devalued and ‘...

—p.1 Alberto Toscano: Solidarity and Political Work by Alberto Toscano
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

the discipline of the conjuncture

[...] the present moment has greater potential for a revitalisation of a Marxist research open to the unpostponable demands of the present, to the imperative of a problematizing practice that cannot presuppose it already has all the analytical tools at its disposal, as though Marx’s restless, mul...

—p.1 Alberto Toscano: Solidarity and Political Work by Alberto Toscano
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

the image of our social life as a problem

[...] the corpus of Marx’s writings [...] excels in problematizing that which we experience as our sensory and intellectual ecosystem, namely what he once termed capitalism’s “religion of everyday life”. The image of our social life as a problem, whose lines of solution are to be conjured and c...

—p.1 Alberto Toscano: Solidarity and Political Work by Alberto Toscano
You edited a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

we’re doing this for you fighting-words

So we went back in and showed them our proposal, and they said no. Doris stood up and pounded on the table and said, “Are we not worth it? We’re doing this for you. We’re cleaning and working for you. Are we not enough?” And then she just looked at everybody and said, “Come on, guys,” and we all ...

—p.1 “They Don’t Understand the Value of Life” by Meagan Day
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

you all cost too much money

The lawyer we were fighting against, he basically told us, “You all cost too much money.” But you want to keep us though, right? Are we not valuable to you? Don’t you think we should have proper health care? Don’t you want us to be healthy in your facility?

When someone gets hurt, they go, “Oh...

—p.1 “They Don’t Understand the Value of Life” by Meagan Day
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

we’re doing this for you fighting-words

So we went back in and showed them our proposal, and they said no. Doris stood up and pounded on the table and said, “Are we not worth it? We’re doing this for you. We’re cleaning and working for you. Are we not enough?” And then she just looked at everybody and said, “Come on, guys,” and we all ...

—p.1 “They Don’t Understand the Value of Life” by Meagan Day
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

a reality which seems all- powerful and overwhelming fighting-words

[...] domination is itself objectively divisive. It maintains the oppressed I in a position of "adhesion" to a reality which seems allpowerful and overwhelming, and then alienates by presenting myste­ rious forces to explain this power. Part of the oppressed / is located in the reality to which...

—p.146 Chapter 4 (98) by Paulo Freire
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

no one can unveil the world for another

[...] dialogical theory requires that the world be unveiled. No one can, however, unveil the world for another. Although one Subject may initiate the unveiling on behalf of others, the others must also become Subjects of this act. The adherence of the people is made possible by this unveiling of ...

—p.142 Chapter 4 (98) by Paulo Freire
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

as if classes were fortuitous agglomerations of individuals

Class conflict is another concept which upsets the oppressors, since they do not wish to consider themselves an oppressive class. Unable to deny, try as they may, the existence of social classes, they preach the need for understanding and harmony between those who buy and those who are obliged to...

—p.116 Chapter 4 (98) by Paulo Freire
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

as long as I fight, I am moved by hope

Nor yet can dialogue exist without hope. Hope is rooted in men's incompletion, from which they move out in constant search—a search which can be carried out only in communion with others. Hopelessness is a form of silence, of denying the world and fleeing from it. The dehumanization resulting fro...

—p.64 Chapter 3 (60) by Paulo Freire
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

dialogue cannot exist without humility

On the other hand, dialogue cannot exist without humility. The naming of the world, through which people constantly re-create that world, cannot be an act of arrogance. Dialogue, as the encounter of those addressed to the common task of learning and acting, is broken if the parties (or one of the...

—p.63 Chapter 3 (60) by Paulo Freire
You edited a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

people do not exist apart from the world

Problem-posing education is revolutionary futurity. Hence it is prophetic (and, as such, hopeful). Hence, it corresponds to the historical nature of humankind. Hence, it affirms women and men as beings who transcend themselves, who move forward and look ahead, for whom immobility represents a fat...

—p.57 Chapter 2 (44) by Paulo Freire
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

people do not exist apart from the world

Problem-posing education is revolutionary futurity. Hence it is prophetic (and, as such, hopeful). Hence, it corresponds to the historical nature of humankind. Hence, it affirms women and men as beings who transcend themselves, who move forward and look ahead, for whom immobility represents a fat...

—p.57 Chapter 2 (44) by Paulo Freire
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

a reality in process

In problem-posing education, people develop their power to perceive critically the way they exist in the world with which and in which they find themselves; they come to see the world not as a static reality, but as a reality in process, in transformation. Although the dialectical relations of ...

—p.56 Chapter 2 (44) by Paulo Freire
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

the oppressors are using science and technology

[...] the oppressors are using science and technology as unquestionably powerful instruments for their purpose: the maintenance of the oppressive order through manipulation and repression. The oppressed, as objects, as "things," have no purposes except those their oppressors prescribe for them.

—p.34 Chapter 1 (17) by Paulo Freire
You added a note
3 weeks, 3 days ago

they genuinely consider themselves to be oppressed

[...] the former oppressors do not feel liberated. On the contrary, they genuinely consider themselves to be oppressed. Conditioned by the experience of oppressing others, any situation other than their former seems to them like oppression. Formerly, they could eat, dress, wear shoes, be educated...

—p.31 Chapter 1 (17) by Paulo Freire