Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

Activity

You edited a note
1 week, 3 days ago

living in the Present between pulses advice / living inspo / interiority

[...] 'And I'd bunker up all white-knuckled and stay straight. And count the days. I was proud of each day I stayed off. Each day seemed evidence of something, and I counted them. I'd add them up. Line them up end to end. You know?' Gately knows very well but doesn't nod, lets her do this on jus...

—p.859 by David Foster Wallace
You edited a note
1 week, 3 days ago

living in the Present between pulses advice / living inspo / interiority

[...] 'And I'd bunker up all white-knuckled and stay straight. And count the days. I was proud of each day I stayed off. Each day seemed evidence of something, and I counted them. I'd add them up. Line them up end to end. You know?' Gately knows very well but doesn't nod, lets her do this on jus...

—p.859 by David Foster Wallace
You edited a note
2 weeks ago

suddenly distant piece / silicon-jest topic / heartbreak

'And then all of a sudden it's like he suddenly wasn't there.'

'At this point she'd bring up how I seemed suddenly distant. I would explain in response that I had gotten, suddenly, over champagne, an idea for a truly central piece on the application of state variable techniques to the analysis...

—p.154 Here and there (149) by David Foster Wallace
You added a note
2 weeks ago

there is no other world

I wanted to lead my students to another world, one where people value writing and art more than war, and yet I knew then and I know now that the only thing that matters is to make that world here. There is no other world. This is the only world we are in. This revisable country, so difficult to c...

—p.276 On Becoming an American Writer (251) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

that which you cannot yet imagine why / write

[...] The point of it is in the possibility of being read by someone who could read it. Who could be changed, out past your imagination's limits. Hannah Arendt has a definition of freedom as being the freedom to imagine that which you cannot yet imagine. The freedom to imagine that as yet unima...

—p.274 On Becoming an American Writer (251) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

the whole center of the building is gone inspo / revelation

[...] He had called the station from inside the first tower to describe what was happening. The host quickly thanked him for calling in and then said, in a bit of a panic, Why are you on the phone with me? Why aren't you on your way down?

You don't understand, the man said. The whole center of...

—p.260 On Becoming an American Writer (251) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

we are not what we think we are

We are not what we think we are. The stories we tell of ourselves are like thin trails across something that is more like the ocean. A mask afloat on the open sea.

There were moments before the memory's return when I experienced what I now understand as its absence as not a gap but a whole oth...

—p.226 The Guardians (221) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

ting fiction is an exercise in giving a shit

I have a theory of the first novel now, that it is something that makes the writer, even as the writer makes the novel. That it must be something you care about enough to see through to the end. I tell my students all the time: writing fiction is an exercise in giving a shit - an excuse in findin...

—p.202 The Autobiography of My Novel (197) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

in order to have the time to write

I think writers are often terrifying to normal people - that is, to nonwriters in a capitalist system - for this reason: there is almost nothing they will not sell in order to have the time to write. Time is our mink, our Lexus, our mansion. In a room full of writers of various kinds, time is pro...

—p.192 Impostor (190) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

afraid my roses will be withered inspo / setting

When I return from Maine, home again, I open the door to my apartment, afraid my roses will be withered, fainting dead. No rain for four days. I rush to the back, where I find them giddy, hurling color up from the ground like children with streamers at a parade.

—p.165 The Rosary (146) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

I will make you care

I will never forget the classmate who said to me in workshop, about one of my stories, "Why should I care about the lives of these bitchy queens?" It angered me, but I asked myself whether or not I had failed my characters if my story hadn't made them matter to someone disinclined to like or list...

—p.113 My Parade (97) by Alexander Chee
You edited a note
2 weeks ago

the loss is limitless topic / grief

When an artist dies young there is always talk of the paintings unpainted, the books unwritten, which points to some imaginary storehouse of undone things and not to the imagination itself, the far richer treasure, lost. All of those works are the trail left behind, a path across time, left like ...

—p.90 After Peter (74) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

the loss is limitless topic / grief

When an artist dies young there is always talk of the paintings unpainted, the books unwritten, which points to some imaginary storehouse of undone things and not to the imagination itself, the far richer treasure, lost. All of those works are the trail left behind, a path across time, left like ...

—p.90 After Peter (74) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

the men I wanted to follow into the future are dead

Why am I telling this story? I am, as I've said, a minor character, out of place in this narrative, but the major characters of all these stories from the first ten years of the epidemic have left. The men I wanted to follow into the future are dead. Finding them had made me want to live, and I d...

—p.79 After Peter (74) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

you don't have to tell the reader how to feel advice / writing

Narrative writing sets down details in an order that evokes the writer's experience for the reader, she announced. This seemed obvious but also radical - no one had ever said it so plainly to us. She spoke often of "the job." If you're doing your job, the reader feels what you felt. You don't hav...

—p.51 The Writing Life (41) by Alexander Chee
You edited a note
2 weeks ago

see ourselves as we might a character in a novel

And this, of course, is why you should never read for yourself. You can't give yourself the impersonal reading you need. [...] to succeed, it requires an ability to be coldly impersonal about yourself and your state, so as not to cloud what is there with what you want to see. I think few of us kn...

—p.32 The Querent (17) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

see ourselves as we might a character in a novel

And this, of course, is why you should never read for yourself. You can't give yourself the impersonal reading you need. [...] to succeed, it requires an ability to be coldly impersonal about yourself and your state, so as not to cloud what is there with what you want to see. I think few of us kn...

—p.32 The Querent (17) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

I felt it only when I was writing why / write

[...] There was something I wanted to feel, and I felt it only when I was writing. I think of this as one of the most important parts of my writer's education---that when left alone with nothing else to read, I began to tell myself the stories I wanted to read.

—p.13 The Curse (1) by Alexander Chee
You added a note
2 weeks ago

all my struggles were worth it

It was my greatest dream to live out this kind of story, of power gained through either inborn abilities or persistence, and though I couldn't have said this at the time, this dream coming true would have meant all my struggles were worth it.

—p.4 The Curse (1) by Alexander Chee
You edited a note
2 weeks ago

uniquely magical about fiction why / read

[...] there is this existential loneliness in the real world. I don't know what you're thinking or what it's like inside you and you don't know what it's like inside me. In fiction I think we can leap over that wall itself in a certain way. But that's just the first level, because the idea of men...

—p.62 The Salon Interview: David Foster Wallace (58) by David Foster Wallace
You edited a note
2 weeks ago

willing to sort of die advice / writing

[...] I've found the really tricky discipline to writing is trying to play without getting overcome by insecurity or vanity or ego. Showing the reader that you're smart or funny or talented or whatever, trying to be liked, integrity issues aside, this stuff just doesn't have enough motivational c...

—p.50 An Expanded Interview with David Foster Wallace (21) by David Foster Wallace
You edited a note
2 weeks ago

I am now 33 years old topic / growing-older

I am now 33 years old, and it feels like much time has passed and is passing faster and faster every day. Day to day I have to make all sorts of choices about what is good and important and fun, and then I have to live with the forfeiture of all the other options those choices foreclose. And I’m ...

—p.267 A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again (256) by David Foster Wallace
You edited a note
2 weeks ago

you cannot choose what falls away topic / growing-older

[...] Ellen had said, 'You're past thirty,' and now for the second time in my life I felt dizzyingly untethered, but whereas when I first moved to London that sensation was buoyed by the expectation of long-dreamed-of experience and ballasted with the deep resources of youth, now I had learned th...

—p.41 Available Light (7) missing author
You added a note
2 weeks, 1 day ago

start mobilizing his cryptocurrency assets again

[...] Martin was glad that gemstones were still acceptable trade goods. He looked forward to the day when he could get his thumb drives out of his floor safe and start mobilizing his cryptocurrency assets again.

—p.290 The Masque of the Red Death (245) by Cory Doctorow
You added a note
2 weeks, 1 day ago

when the best people were on top, things worked

Civilizations had risen and fallen before. Humanity needed to work together, but hell was other people. When the best people were on top, things worked: they convinced the rational, cajoled the stubborn, and, frankly, forced the rest. It was for the greater good. Put one of the losers, the takers...

—p.286 The Masque of the Red Death (245) by Cory Doctorow