Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

vii

Introduction

7
terms
2
notes

Fanger, D. (1983). Introduction. In Dostoyevsky, F. Notes From Underground. Bantam Classics, pp. 7-32

(noun) a resolving of specific cases of conscience, duty, or conduct through interpretation of ethical principles or religious doctrine / (noun) specious argument; rationalization

ix

is he constructing a casuistical theory to excuse his own failures?

—p.ix by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

is he constructing a casuistical theory to excuse his own failures?

—p.ix by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

pertaining to Karl Marx and ideas he explicitly explored in his writings; differs from Marxist in that the latter includes ideas developed by others in the same vein of thought

xv

a pre-Marxian, non-"scientific" form of socialism commonly designated as "utopian".

on Dostoevsky's purported doctrine

—p.xv by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

a pre-Marxian, non-"scientific" form of socialism commonly designated as "utopian".

on Dostoevsky's purported doctrine

—p.xv by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

group of progressive-minded commoner-intellectuals in St. Petersburg in the 1840s; in 1849, members of the Circle were arrested and imprisoned, including Dostoyevsky

xv

In the spring of 1849, Dostoevsky was arrested, tried, and sentenced to Siberian prison and exile for his association with the subversive Petrashevsky circle.

—p.xv by Donald Fanger
uncertain
3 years, 6 months ago

In the spring of 1849, Dostoevsky was arrested, tried, and sentenced to Siberian prison and exile for his association with the subversive Petrashevsky circle.

—p.xv by Donald Fanger
uncertain
3 years, 6 months ago

ambiguous; occupying a position at, or on both sides of, a boundary or threshold

xviii

Dostoevsky set about the masterpiece one could call liminal

—p.xviii by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

Dostoevsky set about the masterpiece one could call liminal

—p.xviii by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

(noun) unreasonable or foolhardy contempt of danger or opposition; rashness recklessness / (noun) a rash or reckless act

xxviii

when life has the temerity to imitate literature

—p.xxviii by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

when life has the temerity to imitate literature

—p.xxviii by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

a discourse between two or more people holding different points of view about a subject but wishing to establish the truth through reasoned arguments

xxviii

The familiar dialectic repeats itself: dreams of love and glory, followed by fits of self-hatred, shame, and spite

—p.xxviii by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

The familiar dialectic repeats itself: dreams of love and glory, followed by fits of self-hatred, shame, and spite

—p.xxviii by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

lack of the usual social or ethical standards in an individual or group, which lessens social cohesion and fosters decline; popularized by French sociologist Émile Durkheim in his influential book Suicide

xxix

The fashionable words for this state, in the late twentieth century, are alienation and anomie

—p.xxix by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago

The fashionable words for this state, in the late twentieth century, are alienation and anomie

—p.xxix by Donald Fanger
notable
3 years, 6 months ago
vii

[...] the speaker has involved the reader from the beginning, addressing him directly, anticipating his reactions, preempting his judgments, denying him the comfortable role of spectator.

—p.vii by Donald Fanger 3 years, 6 months ago

[...] the speaker has involved the reader from the beginning, addressing him directly, anticipating his reactions, preempting his judgments, denying him the comfortable role of spectator.

—p.vii by Donald Fanger 3 years, 6 months ago
xix

These "notes" are a performance, part tirade, part memor, by a nameless personage who claims to be writing for himself alone but who consistently manipulates the reader--of whom he is morbidly aware--to the point where there seems to be no judgment the reader can make which the writer has not already made himself. In the absence of any other source of information or perspective, we suffer his contradictions no less helplessly than he does. For Dostoevsky's presence as author is enigmatic and minimal, confined to a pararaph of introduction and three laconic sentences of conclusion.

—p.xix by Donald Fanger 3 years, 6 months ago

These "notes" are a performance, part tirade, part memor, by a nameless personage who claims to be writing for himself alone but who consistently manipulates the reader--of whom he is morbidly aware--to the point where there seems to be no judgment the reader can make which the writer has not already made himself. In the absence of any other source of information or perspective, we suffer his contradictions no less helplessly than he does. For Dostoevsky's presence as author is enigmatic and minimal, confined to a pararaph of introduction and three laconic sentences of conclusion.

—p.xix by Donald Fanger 3 years, 6 months ago