Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

131

David Foster Wallace and the New Sincerity in American Fiction

5
terms
3
notes

examining the idea that DFW is a vanguard in this post-postmodernism wave of authorial sincerity, through the lens of Lionel Trilling's 1972 book Sincerity and Authenticity, where sincerity has to do with inter-personal communication and authenticity simply means being true to the self. sincerity is dialogic in the sense that it requires the reader to participate. great essay

Kelly, A. (2015). David Foster Wallace and the New Sincerity in American Fiction. In Hering, D. Consider David Foster Wallace. Sideshow Media Group, pp. 131-146

(preposition) with due respect to (someone or their opinion), used to express polite disagreement or contradiction (e.g., "narrative history, pace some theorists, is by no means dead")

133

It is important to note here Trilling's contention, pace Donald Davie and others

footnote 1

—p.133 by Adam Kelly
strange
1 year, 9 months ago

It is important to note here Trilling's contention, pace Donald Davie and others

footnote 1

—p.133 by Adam Kelly
strange
1 year, 9 months ago
135

[...] sincerity as a concept has from the beginning been wracked by this kind of difficutly, has never, in fact, evaded its theatrical connection to a notion of performance. "In a traditional sense," van Alphen and Bal tell us, "sincerity indicates the performance of an inner state on one's outer surface so that others can witness it. But the very distinction between inner self and outer manifestation implies a split that assaults the traditional integration that marks sincerity" [...]

—p.135 by Adam Kelly 1 year, 9 months ago

[...] sincerity as a concept has from the beginning been wracked by this kind of difficutly, has never, in fact, evaded its theatrical connection to a notion of performance. "In a traditional sense," van Alphen and Bal tell us, "sincerity indicates the performance of an inner state on one's outer surface so that others can witness it. But the very distinction between inner self and outer manifestation implies a split that assaults the traditional integration that marks sincerity" [...]

—p.135 by Adam Kelly 1 year, 9 months ago

(noun) an expression of real or pretended doubt or uncertainty especially for rhetorical effect / (noun) a logical impasse or contradiction / (noun) a radical contradiction in the import of a text or theory that is seen in deconstruction as inevitable

136

Wallace's artistic method for dealing with this infinite cycle--this mirror or bind or aporia--involves a complex, contemporary logic

—p.136 by Adam Kelly
notable
1 year, 9 months ago

Wallace's artistic method for dealing with this infinite cycle--this mirror or bind or aporia--involves a complex, contemporary logic

—p.136 by Adam Kelly
notable
1 year, 9 months ago
137

[...] Wallace, who recognized that Derrida had "successfully debunked the idea that speech is language's primary instantiation" (Lobster 84), agreed that the effect advertising had of highlighting the complexity and impurity of all discourse could only be responded to by acknowledging one's own implication within this "system of general writing." One must begin by recognizing the lack of any transcendent, absolute, Archimedean point from which to judge the authentic from the inauthentic, the sincere from the manipulative, truth from ideology, and so on.

footnote explains that E Unibus Pluram is not a lament against TV/advertising, but an attempt to understand their power

—p.137 by Adam Kelly 1 year, 9 months ago

[...] Wallace, who recognized that Derrida had "successfully debunked the idea that speech is language's primary instantiation" (Lobster 84), agreed that the effect advertising had of highlighting the complexity and impurity of all discourse could only be responded to by acknowledging one's own implication within this "system of general writing." One must begin by recognizing the lack of any transcendent, absolute, Archimedean point from which to judge the authentic from the inauthentic, the sincere from the manipulative, truth from ideology, and so on.

footnote explains that E Unibus Pluram is not a lament against TV/advertising, but an attempt to understand their power

—p.137 by Adam Kelly 1 year, 9 months ago

(noun) brilliance, panache, quality of being active or spirited or alive and vigorous

139

Wallace demonstrates with comic brio in the short stories in Brief Interviews

—p.139 by Adam Kelly
notable
1 year, 9 months ago

Wallace demonstrates with comic brio in the short stories in Brief Interviews

—p.139 by Adam Kelly
notable
1 year, 9 months ago

the theory and methodology of interpretation, especially the interpretation of biblical texts, wisdom literature, and philosophical texts

139

a second problem with the hermeneutics of suspicion

—p.139 by Adam Kelly
notable
1 year, 9 months ago

a second problem with the hermeneutics of suspicion

—p.139 by Adam Kelly
notable
1 year, 9 months ago

pertaining to a dialogue; used by the Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin in his work of literary theory, The Dialogic Imagination

141

the possibility of sincerity depends upon its becoming dialogic in chracter, always requiring a response from the other to bring it into play

—p.141 by Adam Kelly
notable
1 year, 9 months ago

the possibility of sincerity depends upon its becoming dialogic in chracter, always requiring a response from the other to bring it into play

—p.141 by Adam Kelly
notable
1 year, 9 months ago
145

In a pithy formulation, Steven Connor has quipped that "[b]eing modernist always meant not quite realizing that you were so," whereas "[b]eing postmodernist always involved the awareness that you were so" [...] I would suggest, being a "post-postmodernist" of Wallace's generation means never quite being sure whether you are one, whether you have really managed to escape narcissism, solipsism, irony, and insincerity. Again, this uncertainty is structural, allowing as it does for a genuine futurity that only the reader can provide. Hence Zadie Smith, in her introduction to a recent collection of stories by Wallace and his contemporaries, is right when she claims that their texts are primarily "attempting to make something happen off the page, outside words, a curious thing for a piece of writing to want to do" (Introduction xx). It is only by invoking this future off the page that dialogue can be engaged, and that both reader and writer can be challenged by the dialogic dimension of the reader experience. This call for a two-way conversation characterizes not only Wallace's work, but all the fiction of the New Sincerity. [...]

—p.145 by Adam Kelly 1 year, 9 months ago

In a pithy formulation, Steven Connor has quipped that "[b]eing modernist always meant not quite realizing that you were so," whereas "[b]eing postmodernist always involved the awareness that you were so" [...] I would suggest, being a "post-postmodernist" of Wallace's generation means never quite being sure whether you are one, whether you have really managed to escape narcissism, solipsism, irony, and insincerity. Again, this uncertainty is structural, allowing as it does for a genuine futurity that only the reader can provide. Hence Zadie Smith, in her introduction to a recent collection of stories by Wallace and his contemporaries, is right when she claims that their texts are primarily "attempting to make something happen off the page, outside words, a curious thing for a piece of writing to want to do" (Introduction xx). It is only by invoking this future off the page that dialogue can be engaged, and that both reader and writer can be challenged by the dialogic dimension of the reader experience. This call for a two-way conversation characterizes not only Wallace's work, but all the fiction of the New Sincerity. [...]

—p.145 by Adam Kelly 1 year, 9 months ago