Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

65

The Book, the Broom, and the Ladder: Grounding Philosophy

5
terms
4
notes

on philosophy in his works (Wittgenstein's philosophy of language and Rorty's Pragmatist ethics)

Hayes-Brady, C. (2016). The Book, the Broom, and the Ladder: Grounding Philosophy. In Hayes-Brady, C. The Unspeakable Failures of David Foster Wallace: Language, Identity, and Resistance. Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 65-92

66

[...] in a late interview about the philosophical preoccupations of his work, Wallace responded: if some people read my fiction and see it as fundamentally about philosophical ideas, what it probably means is that these are pieces where the characters are not as alive and interesting as I meant them to be," echoing Wittgenstein, who argued that philosophy should involve more than abstract phenomena, asking: "what is the use of studying philosophy if all that it does for you is to enable you to talk with some plausibility about some abstruse questions of logic, etc., & if it does not improve your thinking about the important questions of everyday life." [...] In other words, the end of philosophy, for Wittgenstein, is not simply the pursuit of academic study, but the better ability to live in and consider the world. [...]

—p.66 by Clare Hayes-Brady 2 years ago

[...] in a late interview about the philosophical preoccupations of his work, Wallace responded: if some people read my fiction and see it as fundamentally about philosophical ideas, what it probably means is that these are pieces where the characters are not as alive and interesting as I meant them to be," echoing Wittgenstein, who argued that philosophy should involve more than abstract phenomena, asking: "what is the use of studying philosophy if all that it does for you is to enable you to talk with some plausibility about some abstruse questions of logic, etc., & if it does not improve your thinking about the important questions of everyday life." [...] In other words, the end of philosophy, for Wittgenstein, is not simply the pursuit of academic study, but the better ability to live in and consider the world. [...]

—p.66 by Clare Hayes-Brady 2 years ago

an optical phenomenon in which dew-covered trees of species whose leaves are wax-covered retroreflect beams of light

75

Claude Sylvanshine in The Pale King, whose surname refers to a dappling of sunlight through leaves in autumn

"dappling of sunlight" is quite pretty, incidentally

—p.75 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
2 years ago

Claude Sylvanshine in The Pale King, whose surname refers to a dappling of sunlight through leaves in autumn

"dappling of sunlight" is quite pretty, incidentally

—p.75 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
2 years ago

a contradiction between two beliefs or conclusions that are in themselves reasonable; a paradox

77

An antinomy is a problem of language similar to a paradox

on their use in Broom

—p.77 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
2 years ago

An antinomy is a problem of language similar to a paradox

on their use in Broom

—p.77 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
2 years ago

follow to absurdity

79

unwilling to allow the sequor ad absurdum approach espoused b Lenore Sr.

on LaVache in Broom

—p.79 by Clare Hayes-Brady
confirm
2 years ago

unwilling to allow the sequor ad absurdum approach espoused b Lenore Sr.

on LaVache in Broom

—p.79 by Clare Hayes-Brady
confirm
2 years ago
82

[...] The Vlad scenario also highlights what Rorty would regard as the misguided tendency to seek extrinsic (in this case divine) meaning in things that manifestly lack intentional significance [...]

—p.82 by Clare Hayes-Brady 2 years ago

[...] The Vlad scenario also highlights what Rorty would regard as the misguided tendency to seek extrinsic (in this case divine) meaning in things that manifestly lack intentional significance [...]

—p.82 by Clare Hayes-Brady 2 years ago

(adjective) keen, sharp / (adjective) vigorously effective and articulate / (adjective) caustic / (adjective) sharply perceptive; penetrating / (adjective) clear-cut, distinct

83

Norris points out that Rorty is less trenchant than Baudrillard

footnote 43. re: Rorty's opposition to the idea of truth

—p.83 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
2 years ago

Norris points out that Rorty is less trenchant than Baudrillard

footnote 43. re: Rorty's opposition to the idea of truth

—p.83 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
2 years ago
84

In view of what Rortv sees as the incommensurability of different vocabularies, he is forced to view truth and knowledge as constructs of whatever vocabulary is seeking them (almost always collective rather than individual). A corollary of this view, however, is that each vocabulary phrases its own inescapable problems. This is a view Rorty clarifies in Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity, where he discusses the nature of truth as a property of statements, not of facts; for example, the color of an object is not true or false, but the statement that such an object is blue has the property of truth or falsehood. He argues further that language is made, not discovered, and as such, truth is a creation, not an extrinsic reality: "since truth is a property of sentences, since sentences are dependent for their existence on vocabularies and since vocabularies are made by human beings, so are truths:*

—p.84 by Clare Hayes-Brady 2 years ago

In view of what Rortv sees as the incommensurability of different vocabularies, he is forced to view truth and knowledge as constructs of whatever vocabulary is seeking them (almost always collective rather than individual). A corollary of this view, however, is that each vocabulary phrases its own inescapable problems. This is a view Rorty clarifies in Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity, where he discusses the nature of truth as a property of statements, not of facts; for example, the color of an object is not true or false, but the statement that such an object is blue has the property of truth or falsehood. He argues further that language is made, not discovered, and as such, truth is a creation, not an extrinsic reality: "since truth is a property of sentences, since sentences are dependent for their existence on vocabularies and since vocabularies are made by human beings, so are truths:*

—p.84 by Clare Hayes-Brady 2 years ago

a term used by Sartre to refer to the state in which one is unable to take themselves or anything else seriously because of their acute awareness that they and the world are mediated by language

87

it can put "ironists" in danger of becoming what Sartre called "metastable"

on Lenore in Broom

—p.87 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
2 years ago

it can put "ironists" in danger of becoming what Sartre called "metastable"

on Lenore in Broom

—p.87 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
2 years ago
88

Boswell referred to Broom as "first and foremost a work of metafiction," but I do not fully agree. While the "direct and immediate concern with fiction-making itself" that characterizes the metafictionist, is undeniably present in Broom, it is superseded by a much more pressing concern: how to actually live in a linguistically unstable world, the same concern Wallace observed in Wittgenstein's Mistress. Broom offers a structural meditation on exactly that instability, forcing he novel's form to replicate the linguistic labyrinth of its characters; the novel explores, and indeed exploits, the conventions of metafiction, but does not allow the work to be overwhelmed by its metafictionality. Rather, Broom is more a work that interrogates metafiction by means of its own devices, and finds it wanting. [...]

in Understanding p31

so it's like meta-metafiction lol

—p.88 by Clare Hayes-Brady 2 years ago

Boswell referred to Broom as "first and foremost a work of metafiction," but I do not fully agree. While the "direct and immediate concern with fiction-making itself" that characterizes the metafictionist, is undeniably present in Broom, it is superseded by a much more pressing concern: how to actually live in a linguistically unstable world, the same concern Wallace observed in Wittgenstein's Mistress. Broom offers a structural meditation on exactly that instability, forcing he novel's form to replicate the linguistic labyrinth of its characters; the novel explores, and indeed exploits, the conventions of metafiction, but does not allow the work to be overwhelmed by its metafictionality. Rather, Broom is more a work that interrogates metafiction by means of its own devices, and finds it wanting. [...]

in Understanding p31

so it's like meta-metafiction lol

—p.88 by Clare Hayes-Brady 2 years ago