Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

41

"It's Just the Texture of the World I Live in": Wallace and the World

7
terms
4
notes

situating DFW in his time; some thoughts on Westward; on the title of The Pale King

Hayes-Brady, C. (2016). "It's Just the Texture of the World I Live in": Wallace and the World. In Hayes-Brady, C. The Unspeakable Failures of David Foster Wallace: Language, Identity, and Resistance. Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 41-64

also spelled paralepsis and paralipsis; the rhetorical strategy of emphasizing a point by seeming to pass over it

42

on the one hand, it marks him out as what he believes himself to be, pinning him to the White American Male paradigm, while on the other hand, it actively and repeatedly repudiates that label, invoking a kind of paralliptical self-negation

on DFW's self-consciousness in Signifying Rappers

—p.42 by Clare Hayes-Brady
unknown
5 years, 5 months ago

on the one hand, it marks him out as what he believes himself to be, pinning him to the White American Male paradigm, while on the other hand, it actively and repeatedly repudiates that label, invoking a kind of paralliptical self-negation

on DFW's self-consciousness in Signifying Rappers

—p.42 by Clare Hayes-Brady
unknown
5 years, 5 months ago

(noun) cause, origin / (noun) the cause of a disease or abnormal condition / (noun) a branch of knowledge concerned with causes / (noun) a branch of medical science concerned with the causes and origins of diseases

42

Wallace's etiology of his own biased perspective is neither cure nor excuse for its intransitiveness

on DFW's awareness of his cultural position and privilege

—p.42 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago

Wallace's etiology of his own biased perspective is neither cure nor excuse for its intransitiveness

on DFW's awareness of his cultural position and privilege

—p.42 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago

(noun) a literary term coined by Alexander Pope to describe to describe amusingly failed attempts at sublimity (an effect of anticlimax created by an unintentional lapse in mood from the sublime to the trivial or ridiculous); adj is "bathetic"

43

his frames of reference zigzag wildly from bathos to profundity

on DFW

—p.43 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago

his frames of reference zigzag wildly from bathos to profundity

on DFW

—p.43 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago

art for art's sake

47

he invoked Updike's craftsmanship as the epitome of ars gratia artis, while also suggesting that Updike "had never had an unpublished thought."

DFW in Although of Course, p92

—p.47 by Clare Hayes-Brady
confirm
5 years, 5 months ago

he invoked Updike's craftsmanship as the epitome of ars gratia artis, while also suggesting that Updike "had never had an unpublished thought."

DFW in Although of Course, p92

—p.47 by Clare Hayes-Brady
confirm
5 years, 5 months ago

a mental disorder in which a person experiences a combination of schizophrenia symptoms, such as hallucinations or delusions, and mood disorder symptoms, such as depression or mania

47

this tension between veneration and excoriation, often expressed in the same breath, a kind of schizoaffective critical articulation, is a dominant motif in his engagement with recent cultural shifts

on the Updike quote in term 913

—p.47 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago

this tension between veneration and excoriation, often expressed in the same breath, a kind of schizoaffective critical articulation, is a dominant motif in his engagement with recent cultural shifts

on the Updike quote in term 913

—p.47 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago
48

While he tended to elide the "American" from his discussion of what it meant to be an American human being, Wallace was explicitly, exhaustingly conscious of writing from an American perspective, and repeatedly articulated his struggles with taking a perspective outside of his own. Lee Konstantinou comprehensively traces Wallace's engagement with media stimulation and the performative cosmopolitanism of a type of educated American, suggesting that Wallace's engagement with informational "discloses some of the most troubling aporia of [his] style. Wallace's inability to represent a genuine cosmopolitanism in ['The Suffering Channel'] is not simply an individual failure but is, for him, an indictment of the very 'view' that he understands himself to be inhabiting". The paralyzing consciousness of mediated perspective, then, positions Wallace as an uncomfortably but inescapably American author. Konstantinou points out, indeed that the critical tendency to read Wallace in light of his American-ness, even his most specifically local texts "[showcase] a longing for the international," but notes that this longing is unmet in "The Suffering Channel," trapped by its own self-focus. Konstantinou astutely notes that Wallace's internationalism is different from the globalism of De Lillo or Pynchon, and emerges from a desire to disrupt the myopic ethnocentricity of late-century America. [...]

citing "The World of David Foster Wallace" in Boundary 2, 40.3 (September 2013)

—p.48 by Clare Hayes-Brady 5 years, 5 months ago

While he tended to elide the "American" from his discussion of what it meant to be an American human being, Wallace was explicitly, exhaustingly conscious of writing from an American perspective, and repeatedly articulated his struggles with taking a perspective outside of his own. Lee Konstantinou comprehensively traces Wallace's engagement with media stimulation and the performative cosmopolitanism of a type of educated American, suggesting that Wallace's engagement with informational "discloses some of the most troubling aporia of [his] style. Wallace's inability to represent a genuine cosmopolitanism in ['The Suffering Channel'] is not simply an individual failure but is, for him, an indictment of the very 'view' that he understands himself to be inhabiting". The paralyzing consciousness of mediated perspective, then, positions Wallace as an uncomfortably but inescapably American author. Konstantinou points out, indeed that the critical tendency to read Wallace in light of his American-ness, even his most specifically local texts "[showcase] a longing for the international," but notes that this longing is unmet in "The Suffering Channel," trapped by its own self-focus. Konstantinou astutely notes that Wallace's internationalism is different from the globalism of De Lillo or Pynchon, and emerges from a desire to disrupt the myopic ethnocentricity of late-century America. [...]

citing "The World of David Foster Wallace" in Boundary 2, 40.3 (September 2013)

—p.48 by Clare Hayes-Brady 5 years, 5 months ago

(noun) a painkilling drug or medicine

48

mirrors processes of adolescent self-definition, functioning as an anodyne of sorts to infantile narcisissm, refusing to look beyond the borders of its own importance

on DFW's relationship (i.e., where he places himself in the panthen) with other American postmodernist fiction writers

—p.48 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago

mirrors processes of adolescent self-definition, functioning as an anodyne of sorts to infantile narcisissm, refusing to look beyond the borders of its own importance

on DFW's relationship (i.e., where he places himself in the panthen) with other American postmodernist fiction writers

—p.48 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago
59

[...] "The Soul is Not a Smithy", in its invocation of Joyce's artistic credo, seems also to resist ideas of the capacity of literature to formulate and maintain a coherent identity. [...]

apparently the title is a reference to the end of James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

—p.59 by Clare Hayes-Brady 5 years, 5 months ago

[...] "The Soul is Not a Smithy", in its invocation of Joyce's artistic credo, seems also to resist ideas of the capacity of literature to formulate and maintain a coherent identity. [...]

apparently the title is a reference to the end of James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

—p.59 by Clare Hayes-Brady 5 years, 5 months ago
59

[...] "Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature," explicitly invokes Rortian philosophy, taking its title from Rorty's 1979 book of the same name. [...]

referring to the Oblivion piece about a man whose mother had a terrifying face due to plastic surgery

—p.59 by Clare Hayes-Brady 5 years, 5 months ago

[...] "Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature," explicitly invokes Rortian philosophy, taking its title from Rorty's 1979 book of the same name. [...]

referring to the Oblivion piece about a man whose mother had a terrifying face due to plastic surgery

—p.59 by Clare Hayes-Brady 5 years, 5 months ago
60

[...] While Wallace may also have been referring to Pynchon, to Tennyson, More, or Lytton, or indeed to all simultaneously, the echoes of Keats throughout the text strongly suggest "La Belle Dame Sans Merci" as a--if not the--title source for the novel.

from stanza ten of the poem: "I saw pale kings and princes too"

—p.60 by Clare Hayes-Brady 5 years, 5 months ago

[...] While Wallace may also have been referring to Pynchon, to Tennyson, More, or Lytton, or indeed to all simultaneously, the echoes of Keats throughout the text strongly suggest "La Belle Dame Sans Merci" as a--if not the--title source for the novel.

from stanza ten of the poem: "I saw pale kings and princes too"

—p.60 by Clare Hayes-Brady 5 years, 5 months ago

(verb) depict or describe in painting or words; suffuse or highlight (something) with a bright color or light

62

to limn and to limit

—p.62 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago

to limn and to limit

—p.62 by Clare Hayes-Brady
notable
5 years, 5 months ago