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69

The Task of the Translator

An Introduction to the Translation of Baudelaire’s Tableaux Parisiens

2
terms
1
notes

Benjamin, W. (1969). The Task of the Translator. In Benjamin, W. Illuminations: Essays and Reflections. Schocken, pp. 69-82

(adjective) expressing or of the nature of necessary truth or absolute certainty

70

In principle, the first question can be decided only contingently; the second, however, apodictically

—p.70 by Walter Benjamin
notable
7 months, 1 week ago

In principle, the first question can be decided only contingently; the second, however, apodictically

—p.70 by Walter Benjamin
notable
7 months, 1 week ago

(adjective) relating to or concerned with earning a living / (adjective) utilitarian practical

77

There is no muse of philosophy, nor is there one of translation. But despite the claims of sentimental artists, these two are not banausic.

like: banal?

—p.77 by Walter Benjamin
notable
7 months, 1 week ago

There is no muse of philosophy, nor is there one of translation. But despite the claims of sentimental artists, these two are not banausic.

like: banal?

—p.77 by Walter Benjamin
notable
7 months, 1 week ago
79

[...] it is not the highest praise of a translation, particularly in the age of its origin, to say that it reads as if it had originally been written in that language. Rather, the significance of fidelity as ensured by literalness is that the work reflects the great longing for linguistic complementation. A real translation is transparent; it does not cover the original, does not block its light, but allows the pure language, as though reinforced by its own medium, to shine upon the original all the more fully. This may be achieved, above all, by a literal rendering of the syntax which proves words rather than sentences to be the primary element of the translator. For if the sentence is the 'wall before the language of the original, literalness is the arcade.

pretty

—p.79 by Walter Benjamin 7 months, 1 week ago

[...] it is not the highest praise of a translation, particularly in the age of its origin, to say that it reads as if it had originally been written in that language. Rather, the significance of fidelity as ensured by literalness is that the work reflects the great longing for linguistic complementation. A real translation is transparent; it does not cover the original, does not block its light, but allows the pure language, as though reinforced by its own medium, to shine upon the original all the more fully. This may be achieved, above all, by a literal rendering of the syntax which proves words rather than sentences to be the primary element of the translator. For if the sentence is the 'wall before the language of the original, literalness is the arcade.

pretty

—p.79 by Walter Benjamin 7 months, 1 week ago