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50

Subscribing to the Imaginary Party: Notes on a Politics of Neo-Communism

1
terms
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notes

Merrifield, A. (2011). Subscribing to the Imaginary Party: Notes on a Politics of Neo-Communism. In Merrifield, A. Magical Marxism: Subversive Politics and the Imagination. Pluto Press, pp. 50-74

(common Althusserian term) the process by which ideology, embodied in major social and political institutions (ideological & repressive state apparatuses), constitutes the very nature of individual subjects' identities through the process of "hailing" them in social interactions

58

All totalizing systems that interpellate individual subjects to coincide strictly with their chosen role as social beings always "expulse" a certain residue

—p.58 by Andy Merrifield
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

All totalizing systems that interpellate individual subjects to coincide strictly with their chosen role as social beings always "expulse" a certain residue

—p.58 by Andy Merrifield
notable
1 year, 2 months ago
59

[...] The non-coincidence reveals the limit of power's political desire to control totally, of its quest for ultimate and indomitable mastery. No system of control can ever be ultimate and indomitable mastery. No system of control can ever be total, can ever be without possibility, contingency, inconspicuous cracks, without little holes in the net, glimmers of light and pockets of fresh air. There is always leakiness to culture and society, a non-coincidence between capitalist subjects and capitalist society, always unforeseen circumstances buried within the everyday, immanent moments of prospective subversion. [....]

—p.59 by Andy Merrifield 1 year, 2 months ago

[...] The non-coincidence reveals the limit of power's political desire to control totally, of its quest for ultimate and indomitable mastery. No system of control can ever be ultimate and indomitable mastery. No system of control can ever be total, can ever be without possibility, contingency, inconspicuous cracks, without little holes in the net, glimmers of light and pockets of fresh air. There is always leakiness to culture and society, a non-coincidence between capitalist subjects and capitalist society, always unforeseen circumstances buried within the everyday, immanent moments of prospective subversion. [....]

—p.59 by Andy Merrifield 1 year, 2 months ago
62

[...] those who don't rule, the bulk of us, are an assorted and fragmented layering of disparate peoples who are neither conscious of class nor motivated to act in the name of any class. Nevertheless, these peoples are often motivated by a desire to act against a ruling class, against a system that this class so evidently props us, a system from which a non-class feels alienated and abused by. We might say that these people aren't so much class-conscious as collectively-conscious of an enemy, conscious of their desire to do something about that enemy, conscious about wanting no truck with that enemy's game. As Gorz remarks, this non-class "is no more than a vague area made up of constantly changing individuals whose main aim is not to seize power in order to build a new world, but to regain power over their own lives by disengaging from the market rationality of productivism. [...]

—p.62 by Andy Merrifield 1 year, 2 months ago

[...] those who don't rule, the bulk of us, are an assorted and fragmented layering of disparate peoples who are neither conscious of class nor motivated to act in the name of any class. Nevertheless, these peoples are often motivated by a desire to act against a ruling class, against a system that this class so evidently props us, a system from which a non-class feels alienated and abused by. We might say that these people aren't so much class-conscious as collectively-conscious of an enemy, conscious of their desire to do something about that enemy, conscious about wanting no truck with that enemy's game. As Gorz remarks, this non-class "is no more than a vague area made up of constantly changing individuals whose main aim is not to seize power in order to build a new world, but to regain power over their own lives by disengaging from the market rationality of productivism. [...]

—p.62 by Andy Merrifield 1 year, 2 months ago
70

the abolition of work will only be emancipatory if it also allows the development of autonomous activity. The abolition of work doesn't mean abolition of time and effort, the desire for activity, the pleasure of creation, the need to cooperate with others and be of some use to the community. Instead, the abolition of work simply means the progressive, but never total, suppression of the need to purchase the right to live by alienating our lives.

quoting Andre Gorz

—p.70 missing author 1 year, 2 months ago

the abolition of work will only be emancipatory if it also allows the development of autonomous activity. The abolition of work doesn't mean abolition of time and effort, the desire for activity, the pleasure of creation, the need to cooperate with others and be of some use to the community. Instead, the abolition of work simply means the progressive, but never total, suppression of the need to purchase the right to live by alienating our lives.

quoting Andre Gorz

—p.70 missing author 1 year, 2 months ago