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75

Tehran

cultivating an imagination

8
terms
2
notes

Prashad, V. (2008). Tehran. In Prashad, V. The Darker Nations: A People's History of the Third World. The New Press, pp. 75-94

75

[...] That year, the Iranian parlia­ment, the Majlis, nationalized the country' s oil industry (owned by the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, where "Anglo" represented the English interests and "Iranian" simply referred to the place from which they drew the oil). [...]

incredible

—p.75 by Vijay Prashad 1 year, 2 months ago

[...] That year, the Iranian parlia­ment, the Majlis, nationalized the country' s oil industry (owned by the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, where "Anglo" represented the English interests and "Iranian" simply referred to the place from which they drew the oil). [...]

incredible

—p.75 by Vijay Prashad 1 year, 2 months ago

a speech or piece of writing that praises someone or something highly (plural: encomia). as the adjective encomiastic, means bestowing praise, eulogistic, laudatory

78

there is the encomium to Iranian women for their buried labors

—p.78 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

there is the encomium to Iranian women for their buried labors

—p.78 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

(verb) to break apart or in two; separate by or as if by violence or by intervening time or space / (verb) to become parted, disunited, or severed

79

described the world as being sundered between "two poles or extremes [...]"

—p.79 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

described the world as being sundered between "two poles or extremes [...]"

—p.79 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

(noun) the scope, extent, or bounds of something

81

The general critique of cultural imperialism stays within a narrow ambit, because it is only the elite or the urban sections that have access to the symbolic and material items that enter the Third World

—p.81 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

The general critique of cultural imperialism stays within a narrow ambit, because it is only the elite or the urban sections that have access to the symbolic and material items that enter the Third World

—p.81 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

(adjective) indigenous native / (adjective) formed or originating in the place where found

82

Europe could be dismissed out of hand because the answers to Africa and elsewhere lay within their autochthonous traditions.

—p.82 by Vijay Prashad
confirm
1 year, 2 months ago

Europe could be dismissed out of hand because the answers to Africa and elsewhere lay within their autochthonous traditions.

—p.82 by Vijay Prashad
confirm
1 year, 2 months ago

make (something abstract) more concrete or real

82

most of the cultural commen­tary from the Third World, walked a fine line between the reification of the divide between the colonizer and the colonized, and the treatment of it as dialectical.

—p.82 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

most of the cultural commen­tary from the Third World, walked a fine line between the reification of the divide between the colonizer and the colonized, and the treatment of it as dialectical.

—p.82 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

a contradiction between two beliefs or conclusions that are in themselves reasonable; a paradox

83

Cesaire moved away from the antinomic quality of this analysis, even if only partially

—p.83 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

Cesaire moved away from the antinomic quality of this analysis, even if only partially

—p.83 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago
85

[...] The multinational perspective questioned the racist claim that the darker nations could only be primordial, that blood and custom reduced the imagination of certain people. They could only be tied to kin and co-believer, not to a republican nationalism whose locus was both anticolonial and populist.

In this realm at least, Third World nationalist movements absorbed the idea of nationalism and digested it in accord with the rhythms and demands of their various histories. Fanon, who had learned about cul­tural regeneration in Algeria, developed the second strand of Césaire' s cultural program in terms of the idea of nationalism. Like Césaire, Fanon argued that the period of nationalist struggle enabled a people to rethink the feudal forms legitimized by colonialism. These liberation struggles, as opposed to those for conquest, did not feel the need to jus­tify themselves based on crude biological concepts. The colonial power tries to mobilize every racist idea to break down the morale of national­ism, but with each such attempt the imputed superiority of the colonizer wanes. The people, once held down, now determined the pace of change." Those who were once immobile, the congenital cowards, those lazy beings who have always been made inferior, brace themselves and emerge bristling." The colonial ruler does not understand what has transpired." The end of racism begins with this sudden failure to understand." Finally, the end of colonialism means that the "rigid, spasmic culture of the occupier is liberated," and it opens itself up to the culture of the colonized. "The two cultures can confront one another, enrich one another." Rather than turn inward, away from Europe or any oth­ers, Fanon contends, nationalist culture will explore other cultures as re­sources. In the struggle lies liberation, or at least the process of national struggle gives energy to the national culture, which is now able to come alive and grow. Fanon overplays the lack of racism or the mobilization of biological notions in national liberation movements. Na­tional pride or patriotism often slid into the ugly language of racism or exclusion. But if what Fanon found is not a fundamental rule, it is at least a tendency.

—p.85 by Vijay Prashad 1 year, 2 months ago

[...] The multinational perspective questioned the racist claim that the darker nations could only be primordial, that blood and custom reduced the imagination of certain people. They could only be tied to kin and co-believer, not to a republican nationalism whose locus was both anticolonial and populist.

In this realm at least, Third World nationalist movements absorbed the idea of nationalism and digested it in accord with the rhythms and demands of their various histories. Fanon, who had learned about cul­tural regeneration in Algeria, developed the second strand of Césaire' s cultural program in terms of the idea of nationalism. Like Césaire, Fanon argued that the period of nationalist struggle enabled a people to rethink the feudal forms legitimized by colonialism. These liberation struggles, as opposed to those for conquest, did not feel the need to jus­tify themselves based on crude biological concepts. The colonial power tries to mobilize every racist idea to break down the morale of national­ism, but with each such attempt the imputed superiority of the colonizer wanes. The people, once held down, now determined the pace of change." Those who were once immobile, the congenital cowards, those lazy beings who have always been made inferior, brace themselves and emerge bristling." The colonial ruler does not understand what has transpired." The end of racism begins with this sudden failure to understand." Finally, the end of colonialism means that the "rigid, spasmic culture of the occupier is liberated," and it opens itself up to the culture of the colonized. "The two cultures can confront one another, enrich one another." Rather than turn inward, away from Europe or any oth­ers, Fanon contends, nationalist culture will explore other cultures as re­sources. In the struggle lies liberation, or at least the process of national struggle gives energy to the national culture, which is now able to come alive and grow. Fanon overplays the lack of racism or the mobilization of biological notions in national liberation movements. Na­tional pride or patriotism often slid into the ugly language of racism or exclusion. But if what Fanon found is not a fundamental rule, it is at least a tendency.

—p.85 by Vijay Prashad 1 year, 2 months ago

the attempted reconciliation or union of different or opposing principles, practices, or parties, as in philosophy or religion

87

the new nation had to protect the canon from chauvinism. It had to promote the idea of the composite cul­ ture or an inherent tendency toward syncretism

—p.87 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

the new nation had to protect the canon from chauvinism. It had to promote the idea of the composite cul­ ture or an inherent tendency toward syncretism

—p.87 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

complicated; abstruse; curled inwards

89

because his was not an involuted na­tionalism, he translated work from French and Russian letters

—p.89 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

because his was not an involuted na­tionalism, he translated work from French and Russian letters

—p.89 by Vijay Prashad
notable
1 year, 2 months ago