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298

We Don’t Have to Run Out of Jobs

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O'Reilly, T. (2018). We Don’t Have to Run Out of Jobs. In O'Reilly, T. WTF?: What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us. Random House Business, pp. 298-319

302

We’ve seen how technology platforms are creating new mechanisms that make it easier to connect people and organizations to work that needs doing—a more efficient marketplace for work. You can argue that that is one of the key drivers at the heart of the on-demand revolution that includes companies like Uber and Lyft, DoorDash and Instacart, Upwork, Handy, TaskRabbit, and Thumbtack. The drawbacks of these platforms in providing consistent income and a social safety net shouldn’t blind us to what does work about them. We need to improve these platforms so that they truly serve the people who find work through them, not try to turn back the clock to the guaranteed employment structure of jobs in the 1950s.

this is an extremely superficial analysis of these platforms. the surplus of "work that needs doing" is very much imbricated in the job polarisation trend + rising precarity/inequality in general. people who are customers are those who dont have time and can afford to have someone else do this shit for them, while those who are workers literally just need money. how is this something that "does work"? neo-serfdom isnt a good thing just cus it's mediated by an app

—p.302 by Tim O'Reilly 8 months, 3 weeks ago

We’ve seen how technology platforms are creating new mechanisms that make it easier to connect people and organizations to work that needs doing—a more efficient marketplace for work. You can argue that that is one of the key drivers at the heart of the on-demand revolution that includes companies like Uber and Lyft, DoorDash and Instacart, Upwork, Handy, TaskRabbit, and Thumbtack. The drawbacks of these platforms in providing consistent income and a social safety net shouldn’t blind us to what does work about them. We need to improve these platforms so that they truly serve the people who find work through them, not try to turn back the clock to the guaranteed employment structure of jobs in the 1950s.

this is an extremely superficial analysis of these platforms. the surplus of "work that needs doing" is very much imbricated in the job polarisation trend + rising precarity/inequality in general. people who are customers are those who dont have time and can afford to have someone else do this shit for them, while those who are workers literally just need money. how is this something that "does work"? neo-serfdom isnt a good thing just cus it's mediated by an app

—p.302 by Tim O'Reilly 8 months, 3 weeks ago