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181

Georg Lukacs's Cosmic Chutzpah

2
terms
1
notes

Berman, M. (2001). Georg Lukacs's Cosmic Chutzpah. In Berman, M. Adventures in Marxism. Verso, pp. 181-206

(adjective) of, relating to, or typical of Procrustes (a smith from Greek mythology) / (adjective) marked by arbitrary often ruthless disregard of individual differences or special circumstances / (noun) a scheme or pattern into which someone or something is arbitrarily forced

188

Administrators, soldiers, scientists, even entrepreneurs - everybody in modern society - is forced into the Procrustean bed of reification and systematically deprived of the freedom that everyone is supposed to enjoy

—p.188 by Marshall Berman
uncertain
6 years, 6 months ago

Administrators, soldiers, scientists, even entrepreneurs - everybody in modern society - is forced into the Procrustean bed of reification and systematically deprived of the freedom that everyone is supposed to enjoy

—p.188 by Marshall Berman
uncertain
6 years, 6 months ago
189

[...] Capitalists are rewarded for their inner passivity and lack of integration; but it is urgent to see the human costs of this system, even to its ruling class. Lukacs deepens the case against capitalism by showing us how, even in its mansions on the hill, no one is at home.

[...] Something is fundamentally wrong with modes of thought (whether they are called philosophy, history or science) whose main force is to convince people that there is no alternative to the way they live now. One of the most insidious powers of modern capitalism, Lukacs believes, is its capacity to mobilize the energy of our intellects - and of our intellectuals - to blur our minds and paralyze our will, to reduce us to passive spectators of whatever fate the market inflicts on us.

—p.189 by Marshall Berman 6 years, 6 months ago

[...] Capitalists are rewarded for their inner passivity and lack of integration; but it is urgent to see the human costs of this system, even to its ruling class. Lukacs deepens the case against capitalism by showing us how, even in its mansions on the hill, no one is at home.

[...] Something is fundamentally wrong with modes of thought (whether they are called philosophy, history or science) whose main force is to convince people that there is no alternative to the way they live now. One of the most insidious powers of modern capitalism, Lukacs believes, is its capacity to mobilize the energy of our intellects - and of our intellectuals - to blur our minds and paralyze our will, to reduce us to passive spectators of whatever fate the market inflicts on us.

—p.189 by Marshall Berman 6 years, 6 months ago

(adjective) using or given to coarse language / (adjective) vulgar and evil / (adjective) containing obscenities, abuse, or slander

193

We were just getting used to seeing Lukacs as a great modernist when he came out with a scurrilous, hysterical attack on modernism.

—p.193 by Marshall Berman
confirm
6 years, 6 months ago

We were just getting used to seeing Lukacs as a great modernist when he came out with a scurrilous, hysterical attack on modernism.

—p.193 by Marshall Berman
confirm
6 years, 6 months ago