Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

132

The Intellectual History of a Dangerous Idea, 1942-2012

8
terms
2
notes

Blyth, M. (2015). The Intellectual History of a Dangerous Idea, 1942-2012. In Blyth, M. Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea. Oxford University Press, pp. 132-177

the incessant product and process innovation mechanism by which new production units replace outdated ones; coined by Joseph Schumpeter in 1942 as "the essential fact about capitalism"

132

his concept of gales of "creative destruction" that sweep through the economy. Torn asunder by the entrepreneurial utilization of technology, continual organizational innovation, and the rigors of competition, businesses rise and fall, driving the business cycle over time

—p.132 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

his concept of gales of "creative destruction" that sweep through the economy. Torn asunder by the entrepreneurial utilization of technology, continual organizational innovation, and the rigors of competition, businesses rise and fall, driving the business cycle over time

—p.132 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

an economic law stating that supply creates its own demand (named after eighteenth-century French economist Jean-Baptiste Say)

137

The policy objective [...] "achievement competition" rather than "impediment competition," whereby the quality of products manufactured would create the demand for them, in a modern supply-side restatement of Say's law.

ordoliberal policy re: German firms

—p.137 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

The policy objective [...] "achievement competition" rather than "impediment competition," whereby the quality of products manufactured would create the demand for them, in a modern supply-side restatement of Say's law.

ordoliberal policy re: German firms

—p.137 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

the German variant of social liberalism that emphasizes the need for the state to ensure that the free market produces results close to its theoretical potential

140

ordoliberalism, ordnungspolitik, and the rest, are all about rules means precisely that good economic governance is not about spending

—p.140 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

ordoliberalism, ordnungspolitik, and the rest, are all about rules means precisely that good economic governance is not about spending

—p.140 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

(preposition) with due respect to (someone or their opinion), used to express polite disagreement or contradiction (e.g., "narrative history, pace some theorists, is by no means dead")

142

the liberal path to growth only makes sense if you are an early developer, since you have no competitors--pace the United Kingdom in the eighteenth century and the United States in the nineteenth century. Yet in the contemporary world, development is almost always state led.

—p.142 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

the liberal path to growth only makes sense if you are an early developer, since you have no competitors--pace the United Kingdom in the eighteenth century and the United States in the nineteenth century. Yet in the contemporary world, development is almost always state led.

—p.142 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

a set of 10 economic policy prescriptions considered to constitute the "standard" reform package promoted for crisis-wracked developing countries by Washington, D.C.–based institutions like the IMF and the World Bank (in a nutshell, neoliberalism); term first used in 1989 by English economist John Williamson

142

the insistence that all developing states follow their liberal instruction sheets to get rich, the so-called Washington Consensus approach to development

—p.142 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

the insistence that all developing states follow their liberal instruction sheets to get rich, the so-called Washington Consensus approach to development

—p.142 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

a theory that recessions and depressions are due to the overall level of debt rising in real value because of deflation, causing people to default on loans, which in turns causes bank insolvencies and thus a credit crunch, leading to further recession; developed by Irving Fisher following the Wall Street Crash of 1929

150

depressions do not in fact "right themselves" owing to a phenomenon called debt deflation. Simply put, as the economy deflates, debts increase as incomes shrink, making it harder to pay off debt the more the economy craters

—p.150 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

depressions do not in fact "right themselves" owing to a phenomenon called debt deflation. Simply put, as the economy deflates, debts increase as incomes shrink, making it harder to pay off debt the more the economy craters

—p.150 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago
160

[...] what economists call moral hazard is what normal people call trust. You cannot eliminate the former without destroying the capacity for generating the latter. Without some degree of rule ambiguity and norms of reciprocity, trust cannot emerge. The EU's political project was built on trust, not the elimination of moral hazard. That's why it worked. Its monetary project is based on opposite principles. Yet at the end of the day, how can you run an economy, especially a pan-European monetary economy, without trust as its basis? [...]

—p.160 by Mark Blyth 4 years, 6 months ago

[...] what economists call moral hazard is what normal people call trust. You cannot eliminate the former without destroying the capacity for generating the latter. Without some degree of rule ambiguity and norms of reciprocity, trust cannot emerge. The EU's political project was built on trust, not the elimination of moral hazard. That's why it worked. Its monetary project is based on opposite principles. Yet at the end of the day, how can you run an economy, especially a pan-European monetary economy, without trust as its basis? [...]

—p.160 by Mark Blyth 4 years, 6 months ago

a set of 10 economic policy prescriptions considered to constitute the "standard" reform package promoted for crisis-wracked developing countries by Washington, D.C.–based institutions like the IMF and the World Bank (in a nutshell, neoliberalism); term first used in 1989 by English economist John Williamson

161

The Washington Consensus was [...] fiscal discipline, reordering public expenditure priorities, tax reform, liberalizing interest rates, (maintaining) a competitive exchange rate, liberalizing trade and foreign direct investment (FDI), privatization, and deregulation

authored by John Williamson in 1989

—p.161 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

The Washington Consensus was [...] fiscal discipline, reordering public expenditure priorities, tax reform, liberalizing interest rates, (maintaining) a competitive exchange rate, liberalizing trade and foreign direct investment (FDI), privatization, and deregulation

authored by John Williamson in 1989

—p.161 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

a term for the loans provided by the IMF and the World Bank to countries that experienced economic crises, which come with strings attached: privatisation and deregulation, mainly (the conditions are also known as the Washington Consensus)

163

EU policy in the European periphery as little more than a localized set of structural adjustment policies

—p.163 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

EU policy in the European periphery as little more than a localized set of structural adjustment policies

—p.163 by Mark Blyth
notable
4 years, 6 months ago
172

[...] in the absence of any significant liquidity-constraint, "when spending cuts are perceived as permanent, consumers anticipate a reduction in the tax burden and a permanent increase in their lifetime disposable income." This leads them to spend and invest more today because they perceive that "previously expected large tax increases will not be necessary in the future," which is especially true at higher rates of taxation. When such policies are followed in periods of "fiscal stress," the results are better because the signal that the cuts will be permanent is more credible. [...]

from Alesina and Ardanga's 1998 paper "Tales of Fiscal Adjustment". who tf thinks like this, please tell me

there's a similar one on p174: "Consumers with rational expectations are seen to calculate their lifetime consumption function based on the credibility of the signal to cut spending by the government, and they accurately incorporate these estimates into their private spending decisions."

—p.172 by Mark Blyth 4 years, 6 months ago

[...] in the absence of any significant liquidity-constraint, "when spending cuts are perceived as permanent, consumers anticipate a reduction in the tax burden and a permanent increase in their lifetime disposable income." This leads them to spend and invest more today because they perceive that "previously expected large tax increases will not be necessary in the future," which is especially true at higher rates of taxation. When such policies are followed in periods of "fiscal stress," the results are better because the signal that the cuts will be permanent is more credible. [...]

from Alesina and Ardanga's 1998 paper "Tales of Fiscal Adjustment". who tf thinks like this, please tell me

there's a similar one on p174: "Consumers with rational expectations are seen to calculate their lifetime consumption function based on the credibility of the signal to cut spending by the government, and they accurately incorporate these estimates into their private spending decisions."

—p.172 by Mark Blyth 4 years, 6 months ago