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This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

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39

Hype and Critique

2
terms
1
notes

criticisms from the right, which the authors address:

from the left:

Stutzle, I. and Kaufmann, S. (2017). Hype and Critique. In Stutzle, I. and Kaufmann, S. Thomas Piketty's 'Capital in the Twenty First Century': An Introduction. Verso, pp. 39-54

philosophical and metaphysical theories of divine presence in which the divine encompasses or is manifested in the material world

40

Piketty's thesis--that the tendency towards growing inequality is not a dumb coincidence but rather a law immanent to the economy or at least a strong tendency--is provocative

—p.40 by Ingo Stutzle, Stephen Kaufmann
notable
1 year, 4 months ago

Piketty's thesis--that the tendency towards growing inequality is not a dumb coincidence but rather a law immanent to the economy or at least a strong tendency--is provocative

—p.40 by Ingo Stutzle, Stephen Kaufmann
notable
1 year, 4 months ago
41

While Piketty attacks the dominant economic form, capitalism, he never argues in an anti-capitalist way. First of all, his ‘laws of distribution’ according to his work are valid in every economic formation, not just in capitalism (which he also leaves conceptually vague). For Piketty, growing inequality is a law of wealth per se, not of a specifically capitalist form of wealth. Secondly, his political demands do not amount to a fundamental transformation of the system, but rather are limited to a few changes in the tax system, which are supposed to make capitalism more stable. Piketty’s enormously constructive critique of capitalism makes him compatible to the reigning crisis discourse. Despite all coquetry, Piketty never misses a chance to distance himself from Marx’s ideas (which are attributed to him).

—p.41 by Ingo Stutzle, Stephen Kaufmann 1 year, 4 months ago

While Piketty attacks the dominant economic form, capitalism, he never argues in an anti-capitalist way. First of all, his ‘laws of distribution’ according to his work are valid in every economic formation, not just in capitalism (which he also leaves conceptually vague). For Piketty, growing inequality is a law of wealth per se, not of a specifically capitalist form of wealth. Secondly, his political demands do not amount to a fundamental transformation of the system, but rather are limited to a few changes in the tax system, which are supposed to make capitalism more stable. Piketty’s enormously constructive critique of capitalism makes him compatible to the reigning crisis discourse. Despite all coquetry, Piketty never misses a chance to distance himself from Marx’s ideas (which are attributed to him).

—p.41 by Ingo Stutzle, Stephen Kaufmann 1 year, 4 months ago

(adjective) expressing or of the nature of necessary truth or absolute certainty

44

Piketty’s apodictic statements, for example that the long-term consequences of the wealth distribution dynamic is ‘frightening’

—p.44 by Ingo Stutzle, Stephen Kaufmann
confirm
1 year, 4 months ago

Piketty’s apodictic statements, for example that the long-term consequences of the wealth distribution dynamic is ‘frightening’

—p.44 by Ingo Stutzle, Stephen Kaufmann
confirm
1 year, 4 months ago