Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

Thomas Piketty's 'Capital in the Twenty First Century': An Introduction
by Ingo Stutzle, Stephen Kaufmann
Oct. 31, 2017 - Oct. 31, 2017

Done


9781784786144

Verso, 2017. 112 pages.

3 12
5

p.60
corvée »
(noun) unpaid labor (as toward constructing roa...
p.44
apodictic »
(adjective) expressing or of the nature of nece...
p.40
immanence »
philosophical and metaphysical theories of divi...
p.68
the dangers of the performance ideology
The performance ideology that Piketty promotes ...
p.66
only the market should decide the distribution ...
There is never a ‘meritocracy’ – a ‘just’ corre...
p.65
the capital-labour dialectic
[...] The wage does not pay for labour, but rat...
p.63
risk is the condition for profit
_Concerning risk_: it is true that whoever lend...
p.62
Piketty moves in circles
[...] On the one hand, inequality appears to be...

1

Pikettymania

on the Matthew Effect and how Piketty merely confirmed what people sorta already knew

0 / 0
1

Pikettymania

on the Matthew Effect and how Piketty merely confirmed what people sorta already knew

0 / 0
5

The Prelude: Redistribution, Inequality and Debt Crisis

  • historical context: neoliberalism -> tax competition between states to attract capital -> decline of wages as % of NI
  • then, financial crisis -> public debt -> austerity and private debt
  • thus even mainstream needed to problematise inequality (not for sake of justice but to ensure economic stability/growth)
0 / 1
5

The Prelude: Redistribution, Inequality and Debt Crisis

  • historical context: neoliberalism -> tax competition between states to attract capital -> decline of wages as % of NI
  • then, financial crisis -> public debt -> austerity and private debt
  • thus even mainstream needed to problematise inequality (not for sake of justice but to ensure economic stability/growth)
0 / 1
15

The Book

  • data from tax records
  • capital-income ratio and r > g
  • the myth of meritocracy (so essential to neoliberal capitalism) is starting to lose legitimacy as inherited wealth plays a larger role
  • solution: global wealth tax, less than r, and only for larger fortunes
0 / 4
15

The Book

  • data from tax records
  • capital-income ratio and r > g
  • the myth of meritocracy (so essential to neoliberal capitalism) is starting to lose legitimacy as inherited wealth plays a larger role
  • solution: global wealth tax, less than r, and only for larger fortunes
0 / 4
39

Hype and Critique

criticisms from the right, which the authors address:

  • disputing the claim that inequality tends to grow (theorising that the rich consume their wealth, or that r isnt always > g)
  • that inequality is actually good for fostering innovation (the Paul Graham school of thought)--this criticism misses its mark cus Piketty kinda agrees (he just thinks the dynamics of inheritance will result in the wrong kind of inequality)
  • flawed data (he prob underestimates ineq tbh)
  • doesn't apply to Germany (but it does if you look at wealth)

from the left:

  • that it's too neoclassical; Piketty understands capital as a "thing" instead of a social process (David Harvey). OTOH, Rainer Rilling thinks it's a good thing that the neoclassical mainstream can even conceive of this idea (shifting Overton window?)
  • he overlooks central role of class struggle (Graeber): greater redistribution was won by violence + employers needing to buy workers off to contain red menace
  • ignores deeper analysis of financial industry + the role that plays in maintaining wealth of the super-rich
  • too eurocentric
2 / 1
39

Hype and Critique

criticisms from the right, which the authors address:

  • disputing the claim that inequality tends to grow (theorising that the rich consume their wealth, or that r isnt always > g)
  • that inequality is actually good for fostering innovation (the Paul Graham school of thought)--this criticism misses its mark cus Piketty kinda agrees (he just thinks the dynamics of inheritance will result in the wrong kind of inequality)
  • flawed data (he prob underestimates ineq tbh)
  • doesn't apply to Germany (but it does if you look at wealth)

from the left:

  • that it's too neoclassical; Piketty understands capital as a "thing" instead of a social process (David Harvey). OTOH, Rainer Rilling thinks it's a good thing that the neoclassical mainstream can even conceive of this idea (shifting Overton window?)
  • he overlooks central role of class struggle (Graeber): greater redistribution was won by violence + employers needing to buy workers off to contain red menace
  • ignores deeper analysis of financial industry + the role that plays in maintaining wealth of the super-rich
  • too eurocentric
2 / 1