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50

For Whom Does One Write?

3
terms
1
notes

Sartre, J. (2001). For Whom Does One Write?. In Sartre, J. What is Literature?. Routledge, pp. 50-127

an ancient religious movement that has to do with duality? "an elaborate dualistic cosmology describing the struggle between a good, spiritual world of light, and an evil, material world of darkness"

54

When the enemy is separated from you by a barrier of fire, you have to judge him as a whole, as the incarnation of evil; all war is a form of Manicheism.

—p.54 by Jean-Paul Sartre
notable
3 years ago

When the enemy is separated from you by a barrier of fire, you have to judge him as a whole, as the incarnation of evil; all war is a form of Manicheism.

—p.54 by Jean-Paul Sartre
notable
3 years ago

a force acting from behind (used in cardiology)

56

The milieu is vis a tergo

—p.56 by Jean-Paul Sartre
unknown
3 years ago

The milieu is vis a tergo

—p.56 by Jean-Paul Sartre
unknown
3 years ago
88

Such optimism was at the opposite extreme of the writer's conception of his art; the artist needs an unassimilable matter because beauty is not resolved into ideas. Even if he is a prose-writer and assembles signs, his style will have neither grace nor force if it is not sensitive to the material character of the word and its irrational resistances. And if he wishes to build the universe in his work and to support it by an inexhaustible freedom, the reason is that he radically distinguishes things from thought. His freedom and the thing are homogeneous only in that both are unfathomable, and if he wishes to readapt the desert or the virgin forest to the Mind, he does so not by transforming them into ideas of desert and forest, but by having Being sparkle as Being, with its opacity and its coefficient of adversity, by the indefinite spontaneity of Existence. That is why the work of art is not reducible to an idea; first, because it is a production or reproduction of a being, that is of something which never quite allows itself to be thought; then, because this being is totally penetrated by an existence, that is, by a freedom which decides on the very fate and value of thought. That is also why the artist always had a special understanding of Evil, which is not temporary and remediable isolation of an idea, but the irreducibility of man and the world of Thought.

his writing makes no sense but damn is it pretty

—p.88 by Jean-Paul Sartre 3 years ago

Such optimism was at the opposite extreme of the writer's conception of his art; the artist needs an unassimilable matter because beauty is not resolved into ideas. Even if he is a prose-writer and assembles signs, his style will have neither grace nor force if it is not sensitive to the material character of the word and its irrational resistances. And if he wishes to build the universe in his work and to support it by an inexhaustible freedom, the reason is that he radically distinguishes things from thought. His freedom and the thing are homogeneous only in that both are unfathomable, and if he wishes to readapt the desert or the virgin forest to the Mind, he does so not by transforming them into ideas of desert and forest, but by having Being sparkle as Being, with its opacity and its coefficient of adversity, by the indefinite spontaneity of Existence. That is why the work of art is not reducible to an idea; first, because it is a production or reproduction of a being, that is of something which never quite allows itself to be thought; then, because this being is totally penetrated by an existence, that is, by a freedom which decides on the very fate and value of thought. That is also why the artist always had a special understanding of Evil, which is not temporary and remediable isolation of an idea, but the irreducibility of man and the world of Thought.

his writing makes no sense but damn is it pretty

—p.88 by Jean-Paul Sartre 3 years ago

(noun) a book of the prayers, hymns, psalms, and readings for the canonical hours / (noun) divine office / (noun) a brief summary

89

The breviary of the ambitious bourgeois was 'The Art of Making Good'; the breviary of the rich was 'The Art of Commanding'.

—p.89 by Jean-Paul Sartre
uncertain
3 years ago

The breviary of the ambitious bourgeois was 'The Art of Making Good'; the breviary of the rich was 'The Art of Commanding'.

—p.89 by Jean-Paul Sartre
uncertain
3 years ago