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151

Reconciliation under Duress

7
terms
3
notes

W. Adorno, T. (2007). Reconciliation under Duress. In Brecht, B. et al Aesthetics and Politics. Verso, pp. 151-176

(verb) to renounce upon oath / (verb) to reject solemnly / (verb) to abstain from; avoid

151

the early writings, which were disparaged by his Party and which he had himself abjured

on Lukács

—p.151 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
3 years ago

the early writings, which were disparaged by his Party and which he had himself abjured

on Lukács

—p.151 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
3 years ago
152

[...] It was doubtless his book The Destruction of Reason which revealed most clearly the destruction of Lukács' own. [...]

burn centers in Frankfurt

—p.152 by Theodor W. Adorno 3 years ago

[...] It was doubtless his book The Destruction of Reason which revealed most clearly the destruction of Lukács' own. [...]

burn centers in Frankfurt

—p.152 by Theodor W. Adorno 3 years ago
157

[...] When Brecht, to take an example, devised a kind of childish shorthand to try and crystallize out the essence of Fascism in terms of a sort of gangsterism, he made his 'resistible' dictator, Arturo Ui, the head of an imaginary and apocryphal Cauliflower Trust, instead of the most powerful economic organizations. This unrealistic device proved to be a mixed blessing. By thinking of Fascism as an enterprise belonging to a band of criminals who have no real place in the social system and who can therefore be 'resisted' at will, you strip it of its horror and diminish its social significance. This invalidates the caricature and makes it seem idiotic even in its own terms: the despotic rise of the minor criminal loses its plausibility in the course of the play itself. Satire which fails to stay on the level of its subject lacks spice.

this begets the question of where the balance is you're trying to write dystopian fiction that still inspires. how powerful do you make the bad guy? how hopeless does the situation have to be? you want to create a scene that is horrifying enough to simulate reality but surmountable enough that the viewer leaves thinking, "I should fight back, too"

—p.157 by Theodor W. Adorno 3 years ago

[...] When Brecht, to take an example, devised a kind of childish shorthand to try and crystallize out the essence of Fascism in terms of a sort of gangsterism, he made his 'resistible' dictator, Arturo Ui, the head of an imaginary and apocryphal Cauliflower Trust, instead of the most powerful economic organizations. This unrealistic device proved to be a mixed blessing. By thinking of Fascism as an enterprise belonging to a band of criminals who have no real place in the social system and who can therefore be 'resisted' at will, you strip it of its horror and diminish its social significance. This invalidates the caricature and makes it seem idiotic even in its own terms: the despotic rise of the minor criminal loses its plausibility in the course of the play itself. Satire which fails to stay on the level of its subject lacks spice.

this begets the question of where the balance is you're trying to write dystopian fiction that still inspires. how powerful do you make the bad guy? how hopeless does the situation have to be? you want to create a scene that is horrifying enough to simulate reality but surmountable enough that the viewer leaves thinking, "I should fight back, too"

—p.157 by Theodor W. Adorno 3 years ago

scattered fragments

157

the demand for pragmatic fidelity to life can only refer to a writer's basic experience of reality and the membra disjecta of the subject-matter from which he fashions his work

—p.157 by Theodor W. Adorno
uncertain
3 years ago

the demand for pragmatic fidelity to life can only refer to a writer's basic experience of reality and the membra disjecta of the subject-matter from which he fashions his work

—p.157 by Theodor W. Adorno
uncertain
3 years ago

(borrowed from French) a comment or brief reference that makes an illuminating or entertaining point

160

Lukács contents himself with Schopenhauer's aperçu that

—p.160 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
3 years ago

Lukács contents himself with Schopenhauer's aperçu that

—p.160 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
3 years ago

(noun) ; action practice; as / (noun) exercise or practice of an art, science, or skill / (noun) customary practice or conduct / (noun) practical application of a theory

166

their transition to objectivity remains contemplative and fails to become praxis

—p.166 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
3 years ago

their transition to objectivity remains contemplative and fails to become praxis

—p.166 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
3 years ago

a feeling of melancholy and world-weariness; coined by German author Jean Paul

169

points in its negativity to despair, to an uncontrollable Weltschmerz and to love

—p.169 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
3 years ago

points in its negativity to despair, to an uncontrollable Weltschmerz and to love

—p.169 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
3 years ago

(adjective) extremely loud

170

The stentorian voice of manly conviction which Lukács employs to assert in good Hegelian fashion the primacy of the substantial universal over the specious

—p.170 by Theodor W. Adorno
confirm
3 years ago

The stentorian voice of manly conviction which Lukács employs to assert in good Hegelian fashion the primacy of the substantial universal over the specious

—p.170 by Theodor W. Adorno
confirm
3 years ago

(adjective) characterized by abundance; copious / (adjective) generous in amount, extent, or spirit / (adjective) being full and well developed / (adjective) aesthetically, morally, or generally offensive / (adjective) exceeding the bounds of good taste; overdone / (adjective) excessively complimentary or flattering; effusive

171

Lukács's neo-naivety does not even call a halt before Thomas Mann, whom he plays off against Joyce in a fulsome flattery which would have nauseated the great chronicler of decay.

this is so scathing I love it

—p.171 by Theodor W. Adorno
confirm
3 years ago

Lukács's neo-naivety does not even call a halt before Thomas Mann, whom he plays off against Joyce in a fulsome flattery which would have nauseated the great chronicler of decay.

this is so scathing I love it

—p.171 by Theodor W. Adorno
confirm
3 years ago
175

For all this, it is impossible to rid oneself of the feeling that here is a man who is desperately tugging at his chains, imagining all the while that their clanking heralds the onward march of the world-spirit. He remains dazzled by the power which would never take his insubordinate ideas to heart, even if it tolerated them. [...]

oh my god Adorno

—p.175 by Theodor W. Adorno 3 years ago

For all this, it is impossible to rid oneself of the feeling that here is a man who is desperately tugging at his chains, imagining all the while that their clanking heralds the onward march of the world-spirit. He remains dazzled by the power which would never take his insubordinate ideas to heart, even if it tolerated them. [...]

oh my god Adorno

—p.175 by Theodor W. Adorno 3 years ago