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This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

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5

Narrating

5
terms
2
notes
Needs summary

Wood, J. (2009). Narrating. In Wood, J. How Fiction Works. Vintage, pp. 5-31

a style of third-person narration which uses some of the characteristics of third-person along with the essence of first-person direct speech

8

A novelist's omniscience soon enough becomes a kind of secret sharing; this is called free indirect style, a term novelists have lots of different nicknames for--'close third person', or 'going into character'.

—p.8 by James Wood
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

A novelist's omniscience soon enough becomes a kind of secret sharing; this is called free indirect style, a term novelists have lots of different nicknames for--'close third person', or 'going into character'.

—p.8 by James Wood
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

(noun) rigor severity / (noun) roughness of surface; unevenness / (noun) a tiny projection from a surface / (noun) roughness of sound / (noun) roughness of manner or of temper; harshness

9

Might 'stupid' reflect a slight asperity or distance on the part of the author? Or does the word belong wholly to the character, with the author, in a rush of sympathy, having 'handed' it, as it were, to the tearful fellow?

on the sentence 'Ted watched the orchestra through stupid tears'. an example of free indirect style

—p.9 by James Wood
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

Might 'stupid' reflect a slight asperity or distance on the part of the author? Or does the word belong wholly to the character, with the author, in a rush of sympathy, having 'handed' it, as it were, to the tearful fellow?

on the sentence 'Ted watched the orchestra through stupid tears'. an example of free indirect style

—p.9 by James Wood
notable
1 year, 10 months ago
19

There is a final refinement of free indirect style--we should now just call it authorial irony--when the gap between an author's voice and a character's voice seems to collapse altogether; when a character's voice does indeed seem rebelliously to have taken over the narration altogether. 'The town was small, worse than a village, and in it lived almost none but old people, who died so rarely it was even annoying.' What an amazing opening! It is the first sentence of Chekhov's story 'Rothschild's Fiddle.' The next sentences are: 'And in the hospital and jail there was very little demand for coffins. In short, business was bad.' The rest of the paragraph introduces us to an extremely mean coffin-maker, and we realise that the story has opened in the middle of free indirect style: [...] We are in the midst of the coffinmaker's mind, for whom longevity is an economic nuisance. Chekhov subverts the expected neutrality of the opening of a story or novel, which might traditionally begin with a panning shot before we narrow our focus [...]

—p.19 by James Wood 1 year, 10 months ago

There is a final refinement of free indirect style--we should now just call it authorial irony--when the gap between an author's voice and a character's voice seems to collapse altogether; when a character's voice does indeed seem rebelliously to have taken over the narration altogether. 'The town was small, worse than a village, and in it lived almost none but old people, who died so rarely it was even annoying.' What an amazing opening! It is the first sentence of Chekhov's story 'Rothschild's Fiddle.' The next sentences are: 'And in the hospital and jail there was very little demand for coffins. In short, business was bad.' The rest of the paragraph introduces us to an extremely mean coffin-maker, and we realise that the story has opened in the middle of free indirect style: [...] We are in the midst of the coffinmaker's mind, for whom longevity is an economic nuisance. Chekhov subverts the expected neutrality of the opening of a story or novel, which might traditionally begin with a panning shot before we narrow our focus [...]

—p.19 by James Wood 1 year, 10 months ago

a style of third-person narration which uses some of the characteristics of third-person along with the essence of first-person direct speech

20

His stories, through written technically in authorial third person, seem to emanate from a community of Sicilian peasants; they are thick with proverbial sayings, truisms, and homely similes.

—p.20 by James Wood
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

His stories, through written technically in authorial third person, seem to emanate from a community of Sicilian peasants; they are thick with proverbial sayings, truisms, and homely similes.

—p.20 by James Wood
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

(noun) the inherent nature or essence of someone or something; a distinctive feature; a peculiarity

23

Updike must work to establish the quiddity of his character

I totally forgot the meaning of quiddity :(

a truly awful excerpt from Terrorist follows

—p.23 by James Wood
uncertain
1 year, 10 months ago

Updike must work to establish the quiddity of his character

I totally forgot the meaning of quiddity :(

a truly awful excerpt from Terrorist follows

—p.23 by James Wood
uncertain
1 year, 10 months ago
28

So the novelist is always working with at least three languages. There is the author's own language, style, perceptual equipment, and so on; there is the character's presumed language, style, perceptual equipment, and so on; and there is what we could call the language of the world—the language that fiction inherits before it gets to turn it into novelistic style, the language of daily speech, of newspapers, of offices, of advertising, of the blogosphere and text messaging. [...]

—p.28 by James Wood 1 year, 10 months ago

So the novelist is always working with at least three languages. There is the author's own language, style, perceptual equipment, and so on; there is the character's presumed language, style, perceptual equipment, and so on; and there is what we could call the language of the world—the language that fiction inherits before it gets to turn it into novelistic style, the language of daily speech, of newspapers, of offices, of advertising, of the blogosphere and text messaging. [...]

—p.28 by James Wood 1 year, 10 months ago

(noun) a Russian vehicle drawn by three horses abreast / (noun) a team for such a vehicle / (noun) a group of three / (noun) an administrative or ruling body of three

29

the third horse of this troika

might be the first time I've seen this used to refer to something other than the IMF et al, lol

—p.29 by James Wood
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

the third horse of this troika

might be the first time I've seen this used to refer to something other than the IMF et al, lol

—p.29 by James Wood
notable
1 year, 10 months ago