Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

23

The interview

10
terms
3
notes
Needs summary

Foster Wallace, D. (2013). The interview. In A. Garner, B. and Foster Wallace, D. Quack This Way: David Foster Wallace & Bryan A. Garner Talk Language and Writing. Rosepen Books, pp. 23-145

28

[...] you don't get any sense of the infinity of choices that were made in the text until you start trying to reproduce them. [...]

his suggestion that students try to imitate a page of text word for word (from memory) to learn how to write like the author, so you can feel your muscles working to achieve the same effect

—p.28 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

[...] you don't get any sense of the infinity of choices that were made in the text until you start trying to reproduce them. [...]

his suggestion that students try to imitate a page of text word for word (from memory) to learn how to write like the author, so you can feel your muscles working to achieve the same effect

—p.28 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

relating to stone and gems and the work involved in engraving, cutting, or polishing

44

If I turn in this pellucid, lapidary marvel

—p.44 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

If I turn in this pellucid, lapidary marvel

—p.44 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

translucently clear

44

If I turn in this pellucid, lapidary marvel

—p.44 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

If I turn in this pellucid, lapidary marvel

—p.44 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

a grammatical mistake in speech or writing

47

characterized by crummy, turgid, verbose, abstruse, abstract, solecism-ridden prose

—p.47 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

characterized by crummy, turgid, verbose, abstruse, abstract, solecism-ridden prose

—p.47 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

difficult to understand; obscure

47

characterized by crummy, turgid, verbose, abstruse, abstract, solecism-ridden prose

—p.47 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

characterized by crummy, turgid, verbose, abstruse, abstract, solecism-ridden prose

—p.47 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

(adjective) being in a state of distension; swollen, tumid (opposite of flaccid) / (adjective) exhibiting turgor / (adjective) excessively embellished in style or language; bombastic, pompous

47

characterized by crummy, turgid, verbose, abstruse, abstract, solecism-ridden prose

—p.47 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

characterized by crummy, turgid, verbose, abstruse, abstract, solecism-ridden prose

—p.47 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

a stupid, awkward, or unlucky person

54

the person that's trying it is kind of a schlemiel

—p.54 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

the person that's trying it is kind of a schlemiel

—p.54 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago
80

A good opener, first and foremost, fails to repel. Right? So it's interesting and engaging. It lays out the terms of the argument, and, in my opinion, should also in some way imply the stakes. Right? Not only am I right, but in any piece of writing there's a tertiary argument: why should you spend your time writing this? right? "so here's why the following issue might be important, useful, practical." I would think that if one did it deftly, one could in a one-paragraph opening grab the reader, state the terms of the argument, and state the motivation for the argument. I imagine most good argumentative stuff that I've read, you could boil that down to the opener.

—p.80 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

A good opener, first and foremost, fails to repel. Right? So it's interesting and engaging. It lays out the terms of the argument, and, in my opinion, should also in some way imply the stakes. Right? Not only am I right, but in any piece of writing there's a tertiary argument: why should you spend your time writing this? right? "so here's why the following issue might be important, useful, practical." I would think that if one did it deftly, one could in a one-paragraph opening grab the reader, state the terms of the argument, and state the motivation for the argument. I imagine most good argumentative stuff that I've read, you could boil that down to the opener.

—p.80 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

the use of a word, which is not a noun, as a noun, or as the head of a noun phrase, with or without morphological transformation (e.g., the noun legalization from the verb legalize)

93

Buried verbs, which I was taught are called nominalizations, are turning a verb into a noun for kind of BS-y reasons.

—p.93 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

Buried verbs, which I was taught are called nominalizations, are turning a verb into a noun for kind of BS-y reasons.

—p.93 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago
113

[...] In order for your sentences not to make the reader's eyes glaze over, you can't simply use the same core set of words, particularly important nouns and verbs, over and over again. You have to have synonyms at your fingertips and alternative constructions at your fingertips. And usually, though not in the sense of memorizing vocab words like we were kids, but having a larger vocabulary is usually the best way to do that. The best. having a good vocabulary ups the chances that we're going to be able to know the right word, even if that's the plainest word that will do and to achieve some kind of elegant variation, which I am kind of a fiend for.

—p.113 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

[...] In order for your sentences not to make the reader's eyes glaze over, you can't simply use the same core set of words, particularly important nouns and verbs, over and over again. You have to have synonyms at your fingertips and alternative constructions at your fingertips. And usually, though not in the sense of memorizing vocab words like we were kids, but having a larger vocabulary is usually the best way to do that. The best. having a good vocabulary ups the chances that we're going to be able to know the right word, even if that's the plainest word that will do and to achieve some kind of elegant variation, which I am kind of a fiend for.

—p.113 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

(verb) to renounce upon oath / (verb) to reject solemnly / (verb) to abstain from; avoid

115

I urge your watchers, your seminar attendees, to abjure this habit

—p.115 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

I urge your watchers, your seminar attendees, to abjure this habit

—p.115 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

(preposition) with due respect to (someone or their opinion), used to express polite disagreement or contradiction (e.g., "narrative history, pace some theorists, is by no means dead")

117

The version that's in the book, I think, is a heck of a lot better, pace the terrible capitalization

—p.117 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

The version that's in the book, I think, is a heck of a lot better, pace the terrible capitalization

—p.117 default author
notable
1 year, 2 months ago

(adjective) involving or accomplished with careful perseverance / (adjective) diligent in application or pursuit

117

they cut out a lot of the sedulous stuff

on Harper's

—p.117 default author
uncertain
1 year, 2 months ago

they cut out a lot of the sedulous stuff

on Harper's

—p.117 default author
uncertain
1 year, 2 months ago