Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

131

The Pragmatist's Progress: Umberto Eco on Interpretation

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terms
2
notes

review of Umberto Eco's novel Foucault's Pendulum, which Rorty reads as an "antiessentialist polemic". lots of good ruminations on literary theory

M. Rorty, R. (2000). The Pragmatist's Progress: Umberto Eco on Interpretation. In M. Rorty, R. Philosophy and Social Hope. Penguin, pp. 131-147

(verb) to renounce upon oath / (verb) to reject solemnly / (verb) to abstain from; avoid

132

He is in a mood of wry abjuration

—p.132 by Richard M. Rorty
notable
1 year, 5 months ago

He is in a mood of wry abjuration

—p.132 by Richard M. Rorty
notable
1 year, 5 months ago

(noun) a reversal of circumstances, or turning point; Anglicised form of the Greek "peripeteia"

133

The final stage of the Pragmatist's Progress comes when one begins to see one's previous peripeties not as stages in the ascent toward Enlightenment, but simply as the contingent results of encounters with various books which happened to fall into one's hands.

whoa, this is good

—p.133 by Richard M. Rorty
notable
1 year, 5 months ago

The final stage of the Pragmatist's Progress comes when one begins to see one's previous peripeties not as stages in the ascent toward Enlightenment, but simply as the contingent results of encounters with various books which happened to fall into one's hands.

whoa, this is good

—p.133 by Richard M. Rorty
notable
1 year, 5 months ago

the study of signs and symbols and their use or interpretation (adj: semiotic)

133

all the great dualisms of Western philosophy--reality and appearance, pure radiance and diffuse reflection, mind and body, intellectual rigour and sensual sloppiness, orderly semiotics and rambling semiosis

—p.133 by Richard M. Rorty
notable
1 year, 5 months ago

all the great dualisms of Western philosophy--reality and appearance, pure radiance and diffuse reflection, mind and body, intellectual rigour and sensual sloppiness, orderly semiotics and rambling semiosis

—p.133 by Richard M. Rorty
notable
1 year, 5 months ago

the philosophical attempt to describe things in terms of their apparent intrinsic purpose, directive principle, or goal, irrespective of human use or opinion

134

role in the immanent teleology of world history

—p.134 by Richard M. Rorty
notable
1 year, 5 months ago

role in the immanent teleology of world history

—p.134 by Richard M. Rorty
notable
1 year, 5 months ago
143

In other words, I distrust both the structuralist idea that knowing more about 'textual mechanisms' is essential for literary criticism and the post-structuralist idea that detecting the presence, or the subversion, of metaphysical hierarchies is essential. Knowing about mechanisms of textual production or about metaphysics can, to be sure, sometimes be useful. Having read Eco, or having read Derrida, will often give you something interesting to say about a text which you could not otherwise have said. But it brings you no closer to what is really going on in the text than having read Marx, Freud, Matthew Arnold or F. R. Leavis. Each of these supplementary readings simply gives you one more context in which you can place the text - one more grid you can place on top of it or one more paradigm to which to juxtapose it. Neither piece of knowledge tells you anything about the nature of texts or the nature of reading. For neither has a nature.

—p.143 by Richard M. Rorty 1 year, 5 months ago

In other words, I distrust both the structuralist idea that knowing more about 'textual mechanisms' is essential for literary criticism and the post-structuralist idea that detecting the presence, or the subversion, of metaphysical hierarchies is essential. Knowing about mechanisms of textual production or about metaphysics can, to be sure, sometimes be useful. Having read Eco, or having read Derrida, will often give you something interesting to say about a text which you could not otherwise have said. But it brings you no closer to what is really going on in the text than having read Marx, Freud, Matthew Arnold or F. R. Leavis. Each of these supplementary readings simply gives you one more context in which you can place the text - one more grid you can place on top of it or one more paradigm to which to juxtapose it. Neither piece of knowledge tells you anything about the nature of texts or the nature of reading. For neither has a nature.

—p.143 by Richard M. Rorty 1 year, 5 months ago
145

Unmethodical criticism of the sort which one occasionally wants to call 'inspired' is the result of an encounter with an author, character, plot, stanza, line or archaic torso which has made a difference to the critic's conception of who she is, what she is good for, what she wants to do with herself: an encounter which has rearranged her priorities and purposes. Such criticism uses the author or text not as a specimen reiterating a type but as an occasion for changing a previously accepted taxonomy, or for putting a new twist on a previously told story. Its respect for the author or the text is not a matter of respect for an intentio or for an internal structure. Indeed, 'respect' is the wrong word. 'Love' or 'hate' would be better. For a great love or a great loathing is the sort of thing that changes us by changing our purposes, changing the uses to which we shall put people and things and texts we encounter later.

—p.145 by Richard M. Rorty 1 year, 5 months ago

Unmethodical criticism of the sort which one occasionally wants to call 'inspired' is the result of an encounter with an author, character, plot, stanza, line or archaic torso which has made a difference to the critic's conception of who she is, what she is good for, what she wants to do with herself: an encounter which has rearranged her priorities and purposes. Such criticism uses the author or text not as a specimen reiterating a type but as an occasion for changing a previously accepted taxonomy, or for putting a new twist on a previously told story. Its respect for the author or the text is not a matter of respect for an intentio or for an internal structure. Indeed, 'respect' is the wrong word. 'Love' or 'hate' would be better. For a great love or a great loathing is the sort of thing that changes us by changing our purposes, changing the uses to which we shall put people and things and texts we encounter later.

—p.145 by Richard M. Rorty 1 year, 5 months ago