Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

1

All the while, Martino's ultimate warning—that they might someday regret actually getting the money they wanted—would still hang over these two young men, inherent to a system designed to turn strivers into subcontractors. Instead of what you want to build—the consumer-facing, world-remaking thing—almost invariably you are pushed to build a small piece of technology that somebody with a lot of money wants built cheaply. As the engineer and writer Alex Payne put it, these startups represent "the field offices of a large distributed workforce assembled by venture capitalists and their associate institutions," doing low-overhead, low-risk R&D for five corporate giants. In such a system, the real disillusionment isn't the discovery that you're unlikely to become a billionaire; it's the realization that your feeling of autonomy is a fantasy, and that the vast majority of you have been set up to fail by design.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

All the while, Martino's ultimate warning—that they might someday regret actually getting the money they wanted—would still hang over these two young men, inherent to a system designed to turn strivers into subcontractors. Instead of what you want to build—the consumer-facing, world-remaking thing—almost invariably you are pushed to build a small piece of technology that somebody with a lot of money wants built cheaply. As the engineer and writer Alex Payne put it, these startups represent "the field offices of a large distributed workforce assembled by venture capitalists and their associate institutions," doing low-overhead, low-risk R&D for five corporate giants. In such a system, the real disillusionment isn't the discovery that you're unlikely to become a billionaire; it's the realization that your feeling of autonomy is a fantasy, and that the vast majority of you have been set up to fail by design.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

[...] "Let me tell you what the worst thing would be. The worst thing is that these guys get their funding tomorrow and are stuck doing this for another year. So far, they only lost one."

Paul Martino on the Boomtrain guys

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

[...] "Let me tell you what the worst thing would be. The worst thing is that these guys get their funding tomorrow and are stuck doing this for another year. So far, they only lost one."

Paul Martino on the Boomtrain guys

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

"What parts of the city are you looking in?"

"Oh, you know, the actual city." I asked what that was. "SoMa, China Basin, Mission Bay. What people like us call the city."

He'd been in the city for something like three weeks, and most of what he knew about it came from people who themselves had only been around for eight to 10 weeks. [...]

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

"What parts of the city are you looking in?"

"Oh, you know, the actual city." I asked what that was. "SoMa, China Basin, Mission Bay. What people like us call the city."

He'd been in the city for something like three weeks, and most of what he knew about it came from people who themselves had only been around for eight to 10 weeks. [...]

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

The Ruby developer couldn't name a problem with payroll that his company was solving; he thought they were just solving a problem called payroll. He was only on payroll for the first time in his life, and needless to say had never himself run into payroll problems. But he was working for a startup with YC credentials that had leveraged new technologies and raised a lot of money, so he could reasonably feel now that he hadn't just joined a company that did something incremental—fixed the various problems with payroll, of which there are many—but something revolutionary, i.e., fixing the problem of payroll.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

The Ruby developer couldn't name a problem with payroll that his company was solving; he thought they were just solving a problem called payroll. He was only on payroll for the first time in his life, and needless to say had never himself run into payroll problems. But he was working for a startup with YC credentials that had leveraged new technologies and raised a lot of money, so he could reasonably feel now that he hadn't just joined a company that did something incremental—fixed the various problems with payroll, of which there are many—but something revolutionary, i.e., fixing the problem of payroll.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

"After trying so hard for so long to get rich on paper," he said, "I'm going to dedicate myself to something way bigger than myself." After having felt lonely as an entrepreneur, he wanted to feel as though he was part of a movement "That's bitcoin," he said.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

"After trying so hard for so long to get rich on paper," he said, "I'm going to dedicate myself to something way bigger than myself." After having felt lonely as an entrepreneur, he wanted to feel as though he was part of a movement "That's bitcoin," he said.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

People from the East Coast arrived and thought, "This is a community where people's time is their own." They didn't think, "This is a community where you have to juggle five different things because only one of them is likely to work out."

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

People from the East Coast arrived and thought, "This is a community where people's time is their own." They didn't think, "This is a community where you have to juggle five different things because only one of them is likely to work out."

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

"Our many-billion-dollar business today," Chris said, unable to summon much enthusiasm, "is just a Trojan horse to many more billions of dollars." [...]

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

"Our many-billion-dollar business today," Chris said, unable to summon much enthusiasm, "is just a Trojan horse to many more billions of dollars." [...]

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

[...] My cousin was having the time of his life, but a lot of the startup guys—perhaps, in part, as a defense—saw riding the corporate bus as the most dismal of failures. Even Nick and Chris, who did not know contempt as a mode, were appalled at the thought. This was a somewhat self-delusional attitude, as their second-through sixth-best-case scenarios involved being acquired by one of the five giant, powerful, wealthy companies. Even if Nick and Chris survived another year, there was a good chance they'd just be surviving to put themselves in a position to get a nice signing bonus when they finally conceded to days framed by long bus commutes—just like the many other entrepreneurs who came to look at having a failed startup as an altemative to graduate school.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

[...] My cousin was having the time of his life, but a lot of the startup guys—perhaps, in part, as a defense—saw riding the corporate bus as the most dismal of failures. Even Nick and Chris, who did not know contempt as a mode, were appalled at the thought. This was a somewhat self-delusional attitude, as their second-through sixth-best-case scenarios involved being acquired by one of the five giant, powerful, wealthy companies. Even if Nick and Chris survived another year, there was a good chance they'd just be surviving to put themselves in a position to get a nice signing bonus when they finally conceded to days framed by long bus commutes—just like the many other entrepreneurs who came to look at having a failed startup as an altemative to graduate school.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

[...] One founder (his company was literally an app that optimized app stores for other apps), who'd ordered a water and had taken off neither his backpack nor his jacket, apologized on behalf of everybody for leaving so early.

"When you have an early-stage company," he said, "there's no time to hang out at a cool, trendy bar." He was 23. The bar might have been cool and trendy in Miami in 2004.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

[...] One founder (his company was literally an app that optimized app stores for other apps), who'd ordered a water and had taken off neither his backpack nor his jacket, apologized on behalf of everybody for leaving so early.

"When you have an early-stage company," he said, "there's no time to hang out at a cool, trendy bar." He was 23. The bar might have been cool and trendy in Miami in 2004.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago
1

All these kids, who didn't yet know what it was like to have a company of their own, or wind down a company of their own, or work for a giant company and ride the bus, seemed certain of one thing: that the longing for total revolution that had for so long been the hallmark of youth was, at last, about to be fulfilled. The only thing they could count on was that they were going to be the generation that partook of the process by which all would be rendered irrevocably different. It didn't seem to matter what the difference was, or whom it helped or hurt. It just mattered that things in the future would be unlike anything we'd seen be. And that, in the process, they were sure, many of them would get very rich.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago

All these kids, who didn't yet know what it was like to have a company of their own, or wind down a company of their own, or work for a giant company and ride the bus, seemed certain of one thing: that the longing for total revolution that had for so long been the hallmark of youth was, at last, about to be fulfilled. The only thing they could count on was that they were going to be the generation that partook of the process by which all would be rendered irrevocably different. It didn't seem to matter what the difference was, or whom it helped or hurt. It just mattered that things in the future would be unlike anything we'd seen be. And that, in the process, they were sure, many of them would get very rich.

—p.1 by Gideon Lewis-Kraus 1 year, 11 months ago