Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

7

[...] Probably her husband had his own dull map of roads not traveled. You grow conventional in middle life. Choices made over time present themselves as branches running off the solid oaks that line the overground route to Kensal Rise. You grow gray, and thick in the hips. Yet, on happier days, she saw the same small, high breasts, the same powerful long legs, the familiar and delicious brown animal looking back at her, almost never ill and very strong. How much of this was reality? How much delusion? This was the question of the age, as far as she could tell. And the difference between now and being twenty was she was never sure, not from one moment to the next. Next step Canonbury. Next stop menopause and no more denim. Or was it? Blind worms churning mud through their bodies is a better metaphor for what happens than road not taken or branches unsprouted. But no metaphor will cover it really. It's hopeless.

—p.7 Sentimental Education (5) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago

[...] Probably her husband had his own dull map of roads not traveled. You grow conventional in middle life. Choices made over time present themselves as branches running off the solid oaks that line the overground route to Kensal Rise. You grow gray, and thick in the hips. Yet, on happier days, she saw the same small, high breasts, the same powerful long legs, the familiar and delicious brown animal looking back at her, almost never ill and very strong. How much of this was reality? How much delusion? This was the question of the age, as far as she could tell. And the difference between now and being twenty was she was never sure, not from one moment to the next. Next step Canonbury. Next stop menopause and no more denim. Or was it? Blind worms churning mud through their bodies is a better metaphor for what happens than road not taken or branches unsprouted. But no metaphor will cover it really. It's hopeless.

—p.7 Sentimental Education (5) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago
17

"We live in love."

But it was ridiculous that they were in love! They were nineteen! What were they gong to do: just stay in love all through college and perhaps even beyond, two people who had grown up practically right next door to each other? Just stick it out all the way to the end, a la some pre-Freudian Victorian novel? Thus missing a myriad of sexual and psychological experiences along the way? That was literally crazy!

"It's not literally crazy. Mum's been with Dad since they were fifteen. She had me when she was seventeen!"

"Darryl, your mum stacks shelves at Iceland."

But how had she let that come out of her mouth!

—p.17 Sentimental Education (5) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago

"We live in love."

But it was ridiculous that they were in love! They were nineteen! What were they gong to do: just stay in love all through college and perhaps even beyond, two people who had grown up practically right next door to each other? Just stick it out all the way to the end, a la some pre-Freudian Victorian novel? Thus missing a myriad of sexual and psychological experiences along the way? That was literally crazy!

"It's not literally crazy. Mum's been with Dad since they were fifteen. She had me when she was seventeen!"

"Darryl, your mum stacks shelves at Iceland."

But how had she let that come out of her mouth!

—p.17 Sentimental Education (5) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago
21

From above came the noise of the workers laboring, hammering and nailing, creating surplus value for bloated plutocrats, while down below two anarchists [...]

[thought: joke about searching for something with better exchange value, not use value, after someone has finally read marx]

—p.21 Sentimental Education (5) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago

From above came the noise of the workers laboring, hammering and nailing, creating surplus value for bloated plutocrats, while down below two anarchists [...]

[thought: joke about searching for something with better exchange value, not use value, after someone has finally read marx]

—p.21 Sentimental Education (5) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago
140

"Only guy I know who still owns a beeper."

McRae looked up over his half-moons with a wide-open, undimmed enthusiasm that made even his gentlest son fear for him.

"Really? A lot of the guys at work have 'em."

—p.140 Big Week (131) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago

"Only guy I know who still owns a beeper."

McRae looked up over his half-moons with a wide-open, undimmed enthusiasm that made even his gentlest son fear for him.

"Really? A lot of the guys at work have 'em."

—p.140 Big Week (131) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago
144

"[...] You wanna know the secret? You do it for the feeling you get in the last minute. That's what you're looking for. Look, our lives are easy, right? We switch a button, the light comes on. Press another button, food gets cooked. But you gotta dig deeper than that when you run - into some deeper part of you. That part exists in everyone. Just a matter of finding it again. [...]"

on running marathons

—p.144 Big Week (131) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago

"[...] You wanna know the secret? You do it for the feeling you get in the last minute. That's what you're looking for. Look, our lives are easy, right? We switch a button, the light comes on. Press another button, food gets cooked. But you gotta dig deeper than that when you run - into some deeper part of you. That part exists in everyone. Just a matter of finding it again. [...]"

on running marathons

—p.144 Big Week (131) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago
194

[...] Yet if he could only wipe those American years, that woman ... the wrong path, the years wasted. But what was the kind of pain you just had to live with. He'd give everything on this earth to be twenty-one again, to step into the river of time with Olivia, but have them both be the same age, and have eerything else exactly as it was now, except with those lost years rolled tight in his fist, not yet, unraveled.

—p.194 Kelso Deconstructed (181) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago

[...] Yet if he could only wipe those American years, that woman ... the wrong path, the years wasted. But what was the kind of pain you just had to live with. He'd give everything on this earth to be twenty-one again, to step into the river of time with Olivia, but have them both be the same age, and have eerything else exactly as it was now, except with those lost years rolled tight in his fist, not yet, unraveled.

—p.194 Kelso Deconstructed (181) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago
202

[...] When you're young you try to prove you can do it all, anything - you throw everything and the kitchen sink in there! You're profligate! You've got this sense of unlimited potential. You think you contain multitudes, and in my experience you kind of do, at that age, because you're still sufficiently flexible to contain multitudes, you haven't drawn lines around your shit yet and there is still something ineffable about you, something that can make space for whatever is not you. But that crowd inside thins out. Lord, does it thin out. [...]

—p.202 Blocked (201) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago

[...] When you're young you try to prove you can do it all, anything - you throw everything and the kitchen sink in there! You're profligate! You've got this sense of unlimited potential. You think you contain multitudes, and in my experience you kind of do, at that age, because you're still sufficiently flexible to contain multitudes, you haven't drawn lines around your shit yet and there is still something ineffable about you, something that can make space for whatever is not you. But that crowd inside thins out. Lord, does it thin out. [...]

—p.202 Blocked (201) by Zadie Smith 11 months ago