Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

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1 month, 3 weeks ago

the strangehold of private property

[...] sooner or later, capitalist property relations become a "fetter," a brake on further development of the productive forces. Society cannot move forward any longer because of the strangehold of private property. Revolution then ensues. The clash between socialized production and private ownersh…

—p.xxiv Introduction (v) by Fred Goldstein
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1 month, 3 weeks ago

the golden chains are not so golden anymore

The "golden chains" Marx referred to are not so golden anymore. Marx spoke of workers getting higher wages during a boom while the capitalist got even higher profits [...] these conditions no longer obtain.

For the last several decades, with a slight exception in the mid 1990s, workers' real wag…

—p.xxii Introduction (v) by Fred Goldstein
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1 month, 3 weeks ago

the workers and the business cycle

[...] in Wage Labor and Capital, Marx discussed the question of the workers and the business cycle [...]

—p.xx Introduction (v) by Fred Goldstein
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1 month, 3 weeks ago

it is a capitalist economic crisis

The labor leaders repeat the line of the propagandists of capital in calling the present situation an economic crisis - a classless characterization - when, in fact, it is a capitalist economic crisis. It is a crisis of the system of exploitation in which the bosses are trying to pass their cri…

—p.xviii Introduction (v) by Fred Goldstein
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1 month, 3 weeks ago

eroding the national determination of wages

In fact, the revolution in technology and hte globalization of capitalist production and services are eroding the national determination of wages.

The wage level of the working class in the imperialist countries, under pressure of the global competition set up by the giant monopolies, is being i…

—p.xvii Introduction (v) by Fred Goldstein