Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

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1 week, 6 days ago

his “pure” contemplation of beauty and pleasure

These are hardly heartwarming conclusions. Moreover, the deep influence of status on our individual choices challenges our very sense of free will. The sociologist Pitirim Sorokin writes, “When we ourselves determine something, we feel ourselves free; and especially when this self-determination flo…

—p.263 Status and Culture: How Our Desire for Social Rank Creates Taste, Identity, Art, Fashion, and Constant Change Conclusion: Status Equality and Cultural Creativity (261) by W. David Marx
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1 week, 6 days ago

what Pierre Bourdieu calls hysteresis

At some point our expectations will adjust to these structural realities, but at the moment, we suffer from what Pierre Bourdieu calls hysteresis—the lingering values of a previous age continuing to guide our judgments. Take our feelings toward fame. In the past we assigned high status to anyone wh…

—p.258 Chapter Ten: The Internet Age (223) by W. David Marx
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1 week, 6 days ago

embracing the project of pop music

With the Revenge of the Head in a long-tail world, cultural literacy for the last few decades requires reading a few serious books every year but also consuming products from the largest conglomerates: Marvel superhero movies (Walt Disney), Beyoncé (Columbia/Sony), Keeping Up with the Kardashians (…

—p.246 Chapter Ten: The Internet Age (223) by W. David Marx
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1 week, 6 days ago

omnivorism is the only possible taste left

In many ways omnivorism is the only possible taste left. A singular notion of good taste is unjustifiable in a cosmopolitan world. The scholar Kwame Anthony Appiah defines “cosmopolitanism” as “a recognition and celebration of the fact that our fellow world citizens, in their different places, with…

—p.242 Chapter Ten: The Internet Age (223) by W. David Marx
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1 week, 6 days ago

omnivore taste

Both poptimism and “let people enjoy things” are part of the meta-sensibility behind postmodern culture: omnivore taste. The virtuous “cultured” individual should consume and like everything—not just high culture, but pop and indie, niche and mass, new and old, domestic and foreign, primitive and s…

—p.241 Chapter Ten: The Internet Age (223) by W. David Marx