Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

Activity

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5 days, 3 hours ago

bicycle couriers who work for Deliveroo

[...] the company contorts itself in order to avoid giving the impression that its workers are considered employees [...] "It says bicycle couriers who work for Deliveroo are never to be referred to as workers, employees, or staff, and that the Deliveroo jackets they have to wear on the job are n...

—p.159 Behind the Curtain: How Uber Manages Drivers with Algorithms (138) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 3 hours ago

how Uber can improve its relationship with drivers

[...] I ask if the company tries to build trust with its drivers, and hte answer - that Uber cares about building trust with all of its end users - floors me. The fact that even in an informal interview this person is deploying the language used in the lawsuits gives me pause [...] the senior emp...

—p.158 Behind the Curtain: How Uber Manages Drivers with Algorithms (138) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 3 hours ago

Uber's offshored customer service for drivers

[...] Drivers don't have a dedicated human manager who responds to their inquiries. Instead, they have community support representatives (CSRs), located at the email equivalent of a call center, often located abroad, such as in the Philippines, and managed by third-party companies, like Zendesk. ...

—p.143 Behind the Curtain: How Uber Manages Drivers with Algorithms (138) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 3 hours ago

Uber's offshored customer service for drivers

[...] Drivers don't have a dedicated human manager who responds to their inquiries. Instead, they have community support representatives (CSRs), located at the email equivalent of a call center, often located abroad, such as in the Philippines, and managed by third-party companies, like Zendesk. ...

—p.143 Behind the Curtain: How Uber Manages Drivers with Algorithms (138) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 3 hours ago

generating goodwill for the company

[...] While five minutes is the standard waiting period, after which drivers are to collect their cancellation fee, Uber "recommends" drivers wait at least twice as long for the passenger to show up, essentially generating goodwill for the company through the driver's unpaid waiting time. [...]

—p.117 The Shady Middleman: How Uber Manages Money (107) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 3 hours ago

Uber is both the employer and the umpire

In the relationship between Uber and its drivers, Uber is both the employer (on eof the two parties in the workplace relationship) and the umpire (responsible for negotiating disputes between the two parties). This puts Uber in a opwerful positon. When Uber's policies and practices don't square w...

—p.116 The Shady Middleman: How Uber Manages Money (107) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 3 hours ago

forced to accept the odds that Uber has designed

[...] The company seems unconcerned that its practises severely limit drivers' ability to optimize their earnings. Algorithmic management is a system that works for hte company [...] drives suffer as they are forced to accept the odds that Uber has designed in its own favor.

—p.104 The Technology Pitch: How Uber Creates Entrepreneurship for the Masses (73) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 4 hours ago

permitted manipulation is a one-way street

[...] The note went on to say "Please accept every request that Uber sends your way, and do not cancel tripsin the hope that your nextdispatch willbe a surge trip." In effect, Uber used the promise of surge pricing to shepherd adriver to a particular place at a particular time, and when the drive...

—p.98 The Technology Pitch: How Uber Creates Entrepreneurship for the Masses (73) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 4 hours ago

if he cancels he'll never work in this town again

[...] One Utah driver posted the following in a forum in the summer of 2017:

This is the scam Uber is playing, calling us contractors when we're obviously not. If you're a painting contractor, do you accept ajobwithout knowing what it is or how much it pays? Of course not. But this is exactl...

—p.94 The Technology Pitch: How Uber Creates Entrepreneurship for the Masses (73) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 4 hours ago

trying to juice the promotions of his employer

[...] By tracking incentive offers with pay premiums and working wih the other factors within his control, Frank tries to mximize the benefits of the job. The relationship between Uber and its drivers becomes inherently adversarial, though without particular animosity: Frank, like many drivers, i...

—p.79 The Technology Pitch: How Uber Creates Entrepreneurship for the Masses (73) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

driver-as-entrepreneur

Drivers' experiences demonstrate the gap betwen rhetoric and reality when Uber talks about being a beacon of entrepeneurial oppportunity. The image of driver-as-entrepreneur fails forthree main reasons: drivesr have no control over the raetat whichthey work; they do not determine which jobs they ...

—p.75 The Technology Pitch: How Uber Creates Entrepreneurship for the Masses (73) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

working hard at a job that is failing him

[...] Fernando is also upset about Uber shifting its eligiblity requirement for cars - in 2014, he spent $42,000 on an Uber-eqligible car (which meant a 2005 or newwer model); but in February 2015, Uber began allowing models dating to 2001. "You know how many people went tothe dealer and buy [sic...

—p.74 The Technology Pitch: How Uber Creates Entrepreneurship for the Masses (73) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

at the expense of a dedicated few

[...] The range of driver motivations within Uber's labor pool supports the company's business model of employing part-timers as the majority of its drivers and full-timers as the minority of its drivers: part-timers can inadvertently undermine the leverage that full-timers ned to advocate better...

—p.72 Motivations to Drive: How Uber’s System Rewards Full-Time and Recreational Drivers Differently (49) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

investing $55,000 in a used luxury vehicle

Mehmet used to drive a Toyota CAmry foruberX, which he rented for its TLC plates for ten months at $1,600 a month. Later, he upgraded his vehicle, investing $55,000 ina used luxury vehicle, so he could be eligible forthe higher uberBlack and uberSUV pay rates. His expenses for work amount to abou...

—p.67 Motivations to Drive: How Uber’s System Rewards Full-Time and Recreational Drivers Differently (49) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

which fourteen of the twenty-four hours in a day

Raul, a New York Uber and LYft driver and a former Yellow Cab driver, was working eight to nine hours aday before rate cuts; now he works twelve to fourteen hours. He still values the flexibility [...] But having the autonomy to choose which fourteen of the twenty-four hours in a day to work does...

—p.58 Motivations to Drive: How Uber’s System Rewards Full-Time and Recreational Drivers Differently (49) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

Uber undermines driving as a viable occupation

Raj has been driving professionally in Toronto for nine years ,first as a taxi driver, then as the owner of a for-hire vehicle business, and now for uberSelect, a higher-end service. He admires UBer's technology, but he sees the influx of nonoccupational drivers as a threat to his livelihood: "Co...

—p.57 Motivations to Drive: How Uber’s System Rewards Full-Time and Recreational Drivers Differently (49) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

Lyft part-time driver statistics in NYC

[...] Lyft's 2018 report also fofers a city-by-city breakdown of driver statistics, and itstates that in New York City, 91 pecent of drivers work fewer than twenty hours per week - but that may simply reflect the fact tat drivers who work full time are giving someoftheir hours to local competitor...

—p.52 Motivations to Drive: How Uber’s System Rewards Full-Time and Recreational Drivers Differently (49) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

three important categories of Uber drivers

[...] There are three important categories of Uber drivers: hobbyists, part-timers, and full-timers. Hobbyists are drivers who, quite simply, don't need hte oney. Part-timers need the money but don't or can't work full time for a variety of reasons. Finally, full-timers are just that: people whos...

—p.50 Motivations to Drive: How Uber’s System Rewards Full-Time and Recreational Drivers Differently (49) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

effectively giving up some of their independence

[...] Michael articulates the desire to truly be his own boss, and he enjoys the indepdendence he has as an UBer river that he didn't have in a previous job at a factory. He is grateful to have this job during a period of career transition. However, he may find himself working against higher comm...

—p.46 Driving as Glamorous Labor: How Uber Uses the Myths of the Sharing Economy (21) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

the declining pathways toward upward class mobility

"I went through college throughout my adultlife," he reflects, "I didn't just go get it. I started when I was twenty-two. I would go to work, and I would have to quit school sometimes and work more hours. It took me about ten years on and off." With three children to raise - a daughter who is eig...

—p.42 Driving as Glamorous Labor: How Uber Uses the Myths of the Sharing Economy (21) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

the banner of technological exceptionalism

Silicon Valley carries the banner of "technological exceptionalism", the idea that the regulations and laws that apply to their industry competitors or predecessors do not apply to them for the simple reason that they identify primarily astechnology companies. These tech giants reason that the te...

—p.34 Driving as Glamorous Labor: How Uber Uses the Myths of the Sharing Economy (21) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

to join the Uber driver workforce

To join the Uber driver workforce, prospective drivers download the Uber driver app onto their mobile smartphones. They then take their Uber-eligible vehicles to local mechanics to be certified as in good working order and upload their driver's license numbers and autoinsuranec pplicy numbers to ...

—p.26 Driving as Glamorous Labor: How Uber Uses the Myths of the Sharing Economy (21) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

automation alimony

[...] Silicon Valley has a stroke stake in national debates over whether automation technology, such as self-driving cars, will take all ourjobs. Universal basic income is one form of "automationalimony" that is proposed to relieve the rising inequality often attributed to automation.

—p.24 Driving as Glamorous Labor: How Uber Uses the Myths of the Sharing Economy (21) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

the current American economic climate

[...] frame their technologies as powerful engines of job creation. [...] While society may benefit from automated work, the fear is that these benefits will not be distributed equally: jobless futures imply some will get left behind. This threat isnot an inherent characteristic of technology but...

—p.22 Driving as Glamorous Labor: How Uber Uses the Myths of the Sharing Economy (21) by Alex Rosenblat
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5 days, 5 hours ago

drivers are actually customers of its software

[...] according to the company, its drivers are not workers atall - they are"consumers" of Uber's technology serivces, just as passengersare. [...] Uber's lawyers exlained thatthe company's drivers are actually customers of its software. "Fundamentally, the commercial relationship between these d...

—p.4 Introduction: Using an App to Go to Work—Uber as a Symbol of the New Economy (1) by Alex Rosenblat