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217

Basic Income and Development

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terms
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notes

Standing, G. (2017). Basic Income and Development. In Standing, G. Basic Income: And How We Can Make It Happen. Pelican, pp. 217-246

223

[...] Targeting also addresses yesterday's, not tomorrow's, poverty; it aims to help those who have fallen into poverty rather than those in danger of doing so. Yet the most effective way to reduce poverty is to prevent it, as preventing poverty costs less than helping people out of it.

—p.223 by Guy Standing 3 years, 1 month ago

[...] Targeting also addresses yesterday's, not tomorrow's, poverty; it aims to help those who have fallen into poverty rather than those in danger of doing so. Yet the most effective way to reduce poverty is to prevent it, as preventing poverty costs less than helping people out of it.

—p.223 by Guy Standing 3 years, 1 month ago
231

[...] Once the cash transfers started, parents had enough money to pay school fees, and teachers had money to buy paper, pens, books, posters, paints and brushes, making the school more attractive to parents and children and raising the moral and, probably, the capacity of its teachers.

2008-2009 (small village of 1000 people), with a state-run primary school that required a fee, which many parents couldn't pay

the fact that you needed a "pilot" to be run to ensure this would happen is mind-blowing. sure it's a classic market failure example, but is it not the job of the government to ensure that the economy works??? is that not the whole point??? if the government recognises that primary school education is a good idea, is it not so obviously important to ensure that it's well funded even at the potential psychological cost of printing money? god, what drift

—p.231 by Guy Standing 3 years, 1 month ago

[...] Once the cash transfers started, parents had enough money to pay school fees, and teachers had money to buy paper, pens, books, posters, paints and brushes, making the school more attractive to parents and children and raising the moral and, probably, the capacity of its teachers.

2008-2009 (small village of 1000 people), with a state-run primary school that required a fee, which many parents couldn't pay

the fact that you needed a "pilot" to be run to ensure this would happen is mind-blowing. sure it's a classic market failure example, but is it not the job of the government to ensure that the economy works??? is that not the whole point??? if the government recognises that primary school education is a good idea, is it not so obviously important to ensure that it's well funded even at the potential psychological cost of printing money? god, what drift

—p.231 by Guy Standing 3 years, 1 month ago
237

It is often assumed that low-income countries cannot afford basic income. [...]

which is really a stupid assumption because it relies on a complete lack of imagination. why are these countries low-income? are they actually self-deficient or is it a result of global development policies that rely on paralysed or misdirected productivity in the third world, in order to ensure their status on the periphery of the Washington Consensus-dominated world market? is it possible that outside conditions (including psychologically-induced effects) have prevented these countries from producing as much as they could have?

governments can literally print money (in fact, one way of defining the state is via its legitimacy in doing so) and the fact that they don't is less an indication of its feasibility, and more a call to question the structural adjustment policies that prevent these countries from lessening their dependence on outsiders

—p.237 by Guy Standing 3 years, 1 month ago

It is often assumed that low-income countries cannot afford basic income. [...]

which is really a stupid assumption because it relies on a complete lack of imagination. why are these countries low-income? are they actually self-deficient or is it a result of global development policies that rely on paralysed or misdirected productivity in the third world, in order to ensure their status on the periphery of the Washington Consensus-dominated world market? is it possible that outside conditions (including psychologically-induced effects) have prevented these countries from producing as much as they could have?

governments can literally print money (in fact, one way of defining the state is via its legitimacy in doing so) and the fact that they don't is less an indication of its feasibility, and more a call to question the structural adjustment policies that prevent these countries from lessening their dependence on outsiders

—p.237 by Guy Standing 3 years, 1 month ago