Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

47

Basic Income and Freedom

1
terms
1
notes

Standing, G. (2017). Basic Income and Freedom. In Standing, G. Basic Income: And How We Can Make It Happen. Pelican, pp. 47-70

a type of building designed by English philosopher and social theorist Jeremy Bentham in the late 18th century; allows all (pan-) inmates to be observed (-opticon) by a single watchman without the inmates being able to tell whether or not they are being watched

56

libertarian paternalism derives from Bentham's 'panopticon', a prison design enabling prisoners to be watched by a guard at all times and their behaviour monitored. Bentham's idea was to give prisoners apparent free choice, while knowing they would be punished if they made the 'wrong' choice.

—p.56 by Guy Standing
notable
3 years, 1 month ago

libertarian paternalism derives from Bentham's 'panopticon', a prison design enabling prisoners to be watched by a guard at all times and their behaviour monitored. Bentham's idea was to give prisoners apparent free choice, while knowing they would be punished if they made the 'wrong' choice.

—p.56 by Guy Standing
notable
3 years, 1 month ago
61

Two general principles should be applied to any social policy, especially those pitched as alternatives to an unconditional basic income. The first is:

The Paternalism Test Principle. A social policy is unjust if it imposes controls on some groups that are not imposed on the most free groups in society.

[...]

The Rights-not-Charity Principle. A social policy is just only if it advances the rights or freedom of the recipient or target person rather than the discretion or power of the provider.

good principles

—p.61 by Guy Standing 3 years, 1 month ago

Two general principles should be applied to any social policy, especially those pitched as alternatives to an unconditional basic income. The first is:

The Paternalism Test Principle. A social policy is unjust if it imposes controls on some groups that are not imposed on the most free groups in society.

[...]

The Rights-not-Charity Principle. A social policy is just only if it advances the rights or freedom of the recipient or target person rather than the discretion or power of the provider.

good principles

—p.61 by Guy Standing 3 years, 1 month ago