Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

78

How Copyright Broke

1
terms
1
notes

(Originally published in Locus Magazine, September, 2006)

on the history of copyright & how the context is different now because we have the technology to easily copy content

Doctorow, C. (2008). How Copyright Broke. In Doctorow, C. Content: Selected Essays on Technology, Creativity, Copyright, and the Future of the Future. Tachyon Publications, pp. 78-82

78

Copyright started with a dispute between Scottish and English publishers, and the first copyright law, 1709's Statute of Anne, conferred the exclusive right to publish new editions of a book on the copyright holder. It was a fair competition statute, and it was silent on the rights that the copyright holder had in respect of his customers: the readers. Publishers got a legal tool to fight their competitors, a legal tool that made a distinction between the corpus — a physical book — and the spirit — the novel writ on its pages. But this legal nicety was not "customer-facing." As far as a reader was concerned, once she bought a book, she got the same rights to it as she got to any other physical object, like a potato or a shovel. Of course, the reader couldn't print a new edition, but this had as much to do with the realities of technology as it did with the law. Printing presses were rare and expensive: telling a 17th-century reader that he wasn't allowed to print a new edition of a book you sold him was about as meaningful as telling him he wasn't allowed to have it laser-etched on the surface of the moon. Publishing books wasn't something readers did.

—p.78 by Cory Doctorow 1 year, 6 months ago

Copyright started with a dispute between Scottish and English publishers, and the first copyright law, 1709's Statute of Anne, conferred the exclusive right to publish new editions of a book on the copyright holder. It was a fair competition statute, and it was silent on the rights that the copyright holder had in respect of his customers: the readers. Publishers got a legal tool to fight their competitors, a legal tool that made a distinction between the corpus — a physical book — and the spirit — the novel writ on its pages. But this legal nicety was not "customer-facing." As far as a reader was concerned, once she bought a book, she got the same rights to it as she got to any other physical object, like a potato or a shovel. Of course, the reader couldn't print a new edition, but this had as much to do with the realities of technology as it did with the law. Printing presses were rare and expensive: telling a 17th-century reader that he wasn't allowed to print a new edition of a book you sold him was about as meaningful as telling him he wasn't allowed to have it laser-etched on the surface of the moon. Publishing books wasn't something readers did.

—p.78 by Cory Doctorow 1 year, 6 months ago

(noun) politics based on practical and material factors rather than on theoretical or ethical objectives

79

the realpolitik of unauthorized use is that users are not required to secure permission for uses that the rights holder will never discover

—p.79 by Cory Doctorow
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

the realpolitik of unauthorized use is that users are not required to secure permission for uses that the rights holder will never discover

—p.79 by Cory Doctorow
notable
1 year, 6 months ago