Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

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The DRM Sausage Factory

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originally published as "A Behind-The-Scenes Look At How DRM Becomes Law," InformationWeek, July 11, 2007

about CPTWG (the MPAA's "Content Protection Technology Working Group"), which he attended to get a sense of how DRM became law. not really about the actual tech, more about how to limit consumer options. representatives from the govt, the MPAA, tech companies (like Microsoft), etc. goes into how much influence the MPAA has over govt officials (one in particular)

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This technology, usually called "Digital Rights Management" (DRM) proposes to make your computer worse at copying some of the files on its hard-drive or on other media. Since all computer operations involve copying, this is a daunting task—as security expert Bruce Schneier has said, "Making bits harder to copy is like making water that's less wet."

default author 5 months, 1 week ago

This technology, usually called "Digital Rights Management" (DRM) proposes to make your computer worse at copying some of the files on its hard-drive or on other media. Since all computer operations involve copying, this is a daunting task—as security expert Bruce Schneier has said, "Making bits harder to copy is like making water that's less wet."

—p.35 default author 5 months, 1 week ago
36

The Supreme Court threw out these arguments in a 1984 5-4 decision, the "Betamax Decision." This decision held that the VCR was legal because it was "capable of sustaining a substantially non-infringing use." That means that if you make a technology that your customers can use legally, you're not on the hook for the illegal stuff they do.

This principle guided the creation of virtually every piece of IT invented since: the Web, search engines, YouTube, Blogger, Skype, ICQ, AOL, MySpace… You name it, if it's possible to violate copyright with it, the thing that made it possible is the Betamax principle.

Unfortunately, the Supremes shot the Betamax principle in the gut two years ago, with the Grokster decision. This decision says that a company can be found liable for its customers' bad acts if they can be shown to have "induced" copyright infringement. So, if your company advertises your product for an infringing use, or if it can be shown that you had infringement in mind at the design stage, you can be found liable for your customers' copying. [...]

just some copyright law history, maybe worth knowing one day idk

default author 5 months, 1 week ago

The Supreme Court threw out these arguments in a 1984 5-4 decision, the "Betamax Decision." This decision held that the VCR was legal because it was "capable of sustaining a substantially non-infringing use." That means that if you make a technology that your customers can use legally, you're not on the hook for the illegal stuff they do.

This principle guided the creation of virtually every piece of IT invented since: the Web, search engines, YouTube, Blogger, Skype, ICQ, AOL, MySpace… You name it, if it's possible to violate copyright with it, the thing that made it possible is the Betamax principle.

Unfortunately, the Supremes shot the Betamax principle in the gut two years ago, with the Grokster decision. This decision says that a company can be found liable for its customers' bad acts if they can be shown to have "induced" copyright infringement. So, if your company advertises your product for an infringing use, or if it can be shown that you had infringement in mind at the design stage, you can be found liable for your customers' copying. [...]

just some copyright law history, maybe worth knowing one day idk

—p.36 default author 5 months, 1 week ago