Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

44

Conjugals

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Barthes, R. (2012). Conjugals. In Barthes, R. Mythologies: The Complete Edition, in a New Translation. , pp. 44-47

(noun) a ceremonial feast of the American Indians of the northwest coast marked by the host's lavish distribution of gifts or sometimes destruction of property to demonstrate wealth and generosity with the expectation of eventual reciprocation / (noun) a social event or celebration / (verb) to give (as a gift) especially with the expectation of a gift in return / (verb) to hold or give a potlatch for (as a tribe or group) / (verb) to hold or give a potlatch

44

both potlatch between two families and spectacle of that potlach in the eyes of the crowd

on weddings. sounds about right

—p.44 default author
confirm
1 year, 5 months ago

both potlatch between two families and spectacle of that potlach in the eyes of the crowd

on weddings. sounds about right

—p.44 default author
confirm
1 year, 5 months ago
46

[...] Happiness, in this universe, is to act out a sort of domestic confinement: "psychological" questionnaires, shortcuts, household devices, and timesavers, that whole implemental paradise of magazines, like Elle or L'Express, which glorifies the closure of the hearth, its aproned and slippered introversion, everything which busies home life, infantilizes it, accentuates its innocence, and severs it from a widened social responsibility. "Two hearts, one hearth." The world still exists, of course, but love spiritualizes the hearth and the hearth masks the slum: indigence is exorcised by its ideal image, poverty.

for SJ: the idea of turning inwards in a relationship

—p.46 by Roland Barthes 1 year, 4 months ago

[...] Happiness, in this universe, is to act out a sort of domestic confinement: "psychological" questionnaires, shortcuts, household devices, and timesavers, that whole implemental paradise of magazines, like Elle or L'Express, which glorifies the closure of the hearth, its aproned and slippered introversion, everything which busies home life, infantilizes it, accentuates its innocence, and severs it from a widened social responsibility. "Two hearts, one hearth." The world still exists, of course, but love spiritualizes the hearth and the hearth masks the slum: indigence is exorcised by its ideal image, poverty.

for SJ: the idea of turning inwards in a relationship

—p.46 by Roland Barthes 1 year, 4 months ago