Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

1

Introduction

3
terms
2
notes

DFW as leading the vanguard of discontent with the endless irony of American culture, and Eggers and Foer as following in his footsteps

Pieter den Dulk, A. (2014). Introduction. In Pieter den Dulk, A. Existentialist Engagement in Wallace, Eggers and Foer: A Philosophical Analysis of Contemporary American Literature. Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 1-10

3

[...] The highest that any literary interpretation--including mine--can (and should) strive for is plausibility [...]

he later quotes from the book "Is Literary History Possible" to support this. also mentions that he uses not only the work itself, and the context around it, but also things like author interviews because they influence the typical reader's reading process

—p.3 by Allard Pieter den Dulk 4 years, 6 months ago

[...] The highest that any literary interpretation--including mine--can (and should) strive for is plausibility [...]

he later quotes from the book "Is Literary History Possible" to support this. also mentions that he uses not only the work itself, and the context around it, but also things like author interviews because they influence the typical reader's reading process

—p.3 by Allard Pieter den Dulk 4 years, 6 months ago

and others?

3

the works of Wallace cum suis reaffirm exactly that possibility

no idea

—p.3 by Allard Pieter den Dulk
uncertain
4 years, 6 months ago

the works of Wallace cum suis reaffirm exactly that possibility

no idea

—p.3 by Allard Pieter den Dulk
uncertain
4 years, 6 months ago

a literary trend where readers are expected to take an active role in the creation of a story, as the characters tend to be unexceptional; epitomized by the work of Bret Easton Ellis

3

(defined later on) mentioned as one of the literary trends that DFW and his ilk seek to critique and supersede

—p.3 by Allard Pieter den Dulk
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

(defined later on) mentioned as one of the literary trends that DFW and his ilk seek to critique and supersede

—p.3 by Allard Pieter den Dulk
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

the literary trend of writing about writing with a deconstructionist approach, making the fictionality of fiction apparent to the reader; epitomized by the work of John Barth

3

(defined later one) mentioned as one of the literary trends that DFW and his ilk seek to critique and supersede

—p.3 by Allard Pieter den Dulk
notable
4 years, 6 months ago

(defined later one) mentioned as one of the literary trends that DFW and his ilk seek to critique and supersede

—p.3 by Allard Pieter den Dulk
notable
4 years, 6 months ago
16

In the existentialist view--the view that Kierkegaard, Sartre and Camus (and Wittgenstein also can be said to) share--, an individual is not automatically a self, but has to become one. A human being merely embodies the possibility of becoming a self. According to existentialism, there is no 'true core' that an individual always already 'is' or 'has,' and which underlies selfhood. Becoming a self is the task of human life. A human being has to integrate his individual imitations and possibilities into a unified existence; this is the process of developing a self. If an individual does not assume himself in this way, he does not acquire a self; he is just an immediate natural being, a thing among the things. Such a human being does not 'exist'; he just 'is'. Throughout this study, we will recognize this view of the self in Wallace's writing.

i like this, but on the other hand, i don't know if i agree with the implication that one is either a "self" or not. i feel like a better characterisation would be that everyone is in the process of becoming a self, and in fact the notion of "self" cannot be separated from this very process

—p.16 by Allard Pieter den Dulk 4 years, 6 months ago

In the existentialist view--the view that Kierkegaard, Sartre and Camus (and Wittgenstein also can be said to) share--, an individual is not automatically a self, but has to become one. A human being merely embodies the possibility of becoming a self. According to existentialism, there is no 'true core' that an individual always already 'is' or 'has,' and which underlies selfhood. Becoming a self is the task of human life. A human being has to integrate his individual imitations and possibilities into a unified existence; this is the process of developing a self. If an individual does not assume himself in this way, he does not acquire a self; he is just an immediate natural being, a thing among the things. Such a human being does not 'exist'; he just 'is'. Throughout this study, we will recognize this view of the self in Wallace's writing.

i like this, but on the other hand, i don't know if i agree with the implication that one is either a "self" or not. i feel like a better characterisation would be that everyone is in the process of becoming a self, and in fact the notion of "self" cannot be separated from this very process

—p.16 by Allard Pieter den Dulk 4 years, 6 months ago