Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

93

§13

0
terms
2
notes

David "Sweatman" Cusk and his superhero origin story

Foster Wallace, D. (2012). §13. In Foster Wallace, D. The Pale King. Penguin, pp. 93-101

95

For there were, by this time, degrees and gradations of public sweating, from a light varnish all the way up to a shattering, uncontrollable, and totally visible and creepy sweat. The worst thing was that one degree could lead to the next if he worried about it too much, if he was too afraid that a single sweat would get worse and tried too hard to control or avoid it. The fear of it could bring it on. He did not truly begin to suffer until he understood this fact, an understanding he came to slowly at first and then all of an awful sudden.

—p.95 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

For there were, by this time, degrees and gradations of public sweating, from a light varnish all the way up to a shattering, uncontrollable, and totally visible and creepy sweat. The worst thing was that one degree could lead to the next if he worried about it too much, if he was too afraid that a single sweat would get worse and tried too hard to control or avoid it. The fear of it could bring it on. He did not truly begin to suffer until he understood this fact, an understanding he came to slowly at first and then all of an awful sudden.

—p.95 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago
97

[...] He would mentally repeat this to himself over and over. Franklin Roosevelt was right, but it didn't help--knowing it was the fear that was the problem was just a fact; it didn't make the fear go away. In fact, he started to think that thinking of the speech's line so much just made him all the more afraid of the fear itself. That what he really had to fear was fear of the fear, like an endless funhouse hall of mirrors of fear, all of which were ridiculous and weird. [...]

this is so good

—p.97 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago

[...] He would mentally repeat this to himself over and over. Franklin Roosevelt was right, but it didn't help--knowing it was the fear that was the problem was just a fact; it didn't make the fear go away. In fact, he started to think that thinking of the speech's line so much just made him all the more afraid of the fear itself. That what he really had to fear was fear of the fear, like an endless funhouse hall of mirrors of fear, all of which were ridiculous and weird. [...]

this is so good

—p.97 by David Foster Wallace 1 year, 2 months ago