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171

On Gary Indiana

4
terms
1
notes

by Tobi Haslett

, n. (2016). On Gary Indiana. In , n. n+1 Issue 26: Dirty Work. n+1 Foundation, inc., pp. 171-188

a lower-class Parisian republican in the French Revolution; an extreme republican or revolutionary

172

Indiana the sansculotte

—p.172 by n+1
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

Indiana the sansculotte

—p.172 by n+1
notable
1 year, 10 months ago
177

[...] Indiana’s work suggests a spiritual ambivalence that sees love as tethered to the brutalizing character of our society yet holding out some twinkling promise: a “mortal illness,” yes, but also a “rescuer’s flashlight.” He would object to the comparison (Indiana’s is a fitful radicalism, always wriggling out of ideology’s drab uniform), but his orientation to love resembles Marx’s critique of religious faith: love devolves into an opiate of the masses. Religion dreams of utopias, grasps at transcendence, dignifies our slogging trials — and is fastened to the notion, however distant, of redemption. Might the desire for love, too, be an “expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering?” Might love be “the heart of a heartless world,” “the soul of soulless conditions” — or, in Marx’s most swooning, sympathetic formulation, the “sigh of the oppressed creature”?

earlier, the author brings up theorists like Erich Fromm who come up with Leftist Critiques of Love

—p.177 by n+1 1 year, 10 months ago

[...] Indiana’s work suggests a spiritual ambivalence that sees love as tethered to the brutalizing character of our society yet holding out some twinkling promise: a “mortal illness,” yes, but also a “rescuer’s flashlight.” He would object to the comparison (Indiana’s is a fitful radicalism, always wriggling out of ideology’s drab uniform), but his orientation to love resembles Marx’s critique of religious faith: love devolves into an opiate of the masses. Religion dreams of utopias, grasps at transcendence, dignifies our slogging trials — and is fastened to the notion, however distant, of redemption. Might the desire for love, too, be an “expression of real suffering and a protest against real suffering?” Might love be “the heart of a heartless world,” “the soul of soulless conditions” — or, in Marx’s most swooning, sympathetic formulation, the “sigh of the oppressed creature”?

earlier, the author brings up theorists like Erich Fromm who come up with Leftist Critiques of Love

—p.177 by n+1 1 year, 10 months ago

(noun) a literary term coined by Alexander Pope to describe to describe amusingly failed attempts at sublimity (an effect of anticlimax created by an unintentional lapse in mood from the sublime to the trivial or ridiculous); adj is "bathetic"

177

The horror has passed, and what remains is the slow, lingering bathos as people shuffle into the future.

Bathos flutters over this later novel like a pennant: tragedy has been abolished.

—p.177 by n+1
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

The horror has passed, and what remains is the slow, lingering bathos as people shuffle into the future.

Bathos flutters over this later novel like a pennant: tragedy has been abolished.

—p.177 by n+1
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

(adjective) requiring immediate aid or action / (adjective) requiring or calling for much; demanding

181

A former pornographer, he would transform himself into a Marxist saboteur and an AIDS activist, made and remade by the exigencies of each successive decade.

—p.181 by n+1
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

A former pornographer, he would transform himself into a Marxist saboteur and an AIDS activist, made and remade by the exigencies of each successive decade.

—p.181 by n+1
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

(noun) an expression of real or pretended doubt or uncertainty especially for rhetorical effect / (noun) a logical impasse or contradiction / (noun) a radical contradiction in the import of a text or theory that is seen in deconstruction as inevitable

182

A line from a recent interview in the White Review might explain this strange aporia

—p.182 by n+1
notable
1 year, 10 months ago

A line from a recent interview in the White Review might explain this strange aporia

—p.182 by n+1
notable
1 year, 10 months ago