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21

Desire

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Lyle and Hal's grandfather in IJ: envy of success even though we suspect it's ultimately empty

S. Miller, A. (2016). Desire. In S. Miller, A. The Gospel According to David Foster Wallace: Boredom and Addiction in an Age of Distraction. Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 21-24

22

[...] Desire naturally assumes that its own intensity is strong evidence for the existence of a correspondingly intense satisfaction. Desire assumes some correlative Substance. It invests its idol with the promise of release. But there is no such substance. [...] Desires wants to desire. It blindly wants, more than anything else, its own perpetuation. Nothing will satisfy it. [...] Desire is adaptive. No matter how great the success, its intensity is easily and upwardly adjustable. Success is no Substance. [...]

—p.22 by Adam S. Miller 3 years ago

[...] Desire naturally assumes that its own intensity is strong evidence for the existence of a correspondingly intense satisfaction. Desire assumes some correlative Substance. It invests its idol with the promise of release. But there is no such substance. [...] Desires wants to desire. It blindly wants, more than anything else, its own perpetuation. Nothing will satisfy it. [...] Desire is adaptive. No matter how great the success, its intensity is easily and upwardly adjustable. Success is no Substance. [...]

—p.22 by Adam S. Miller 3 years ago
23

[...] Achievement can be more dangerous than failure. At least failure leaves you with the fantasy of some uppercase Substance. But imagine what happens when "you attain the goal and realize the shocking realization that attaining the goal does not complete or redeem you, does not make everything for your life 'OK' as you are, in the culture, educated to assume" (IJ 680). [...]

on the Enfield Tennis Academy in IJ, and the counselors they hire to prepare kids for success

—p.23 by Adam S. Miller 3 years ago

[...] Achievement can be more dangerous than failure. At least failure leaves you with the fantasy of some uppercase Substance. But imagine what happens when "you attain the goal and realize the shocking realization that attaining the goal does not complete or redeem you, does not make everything for your life 'OK' as you are, in the culture, educated to assume" (IJ 680). [...]

on the Enfield Tennis Academy in IJ, and the counselors they hire to prepare kids for success

—p.23 by Adam S. Miller 3 years ago