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249

Liquid Lives, Compensation Schemes, and the Making of (Unsustainable) Financial Markets

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terms
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notes

Ho, K. (2009). Liquid Lives, Compensation Schemes, and the Making of (Unsustainable) Financial Markets. In Ho, K. Liquidated: An Ethnography of Wall Street. Duke University Press Books, pp. 249-293

(adjective) of the same or equal age, antiquity, or duration

252

the bankers' cultural model of themselves as coeval and identified with the market

—p.252 by Karen Ho
notable
4 years, 7 months ago

the bankers' cultural model of themselves as coeval and identified with the market

—p.252 by Karen Ho
notable
4 years, 7 months ago
260

At the end of the year that's how you tell who's doing the best job - who's made the most money for the firm. And that's also, then, how much money you will make in your bonus. And so when it's all judged on that, you get a skewed version of what life is like because then you judge everybody on how much money they make. And it's not even your fault because that's how you are judged at work every day. So a lot of it is just that you are a product of your environment. So then out in the real world [where] people aren't making that much money, then they don't really matter. They don't really count, so you can treat the guy that gives you coffee as a lesser citizen.

money as a flattening and dehumanising device

—p.260 by Karen Ho 4 years, 7 months ago

At the end of the year that's how you tell who's doing the best job - who's made the most money for the firm. And that's also, then, how much money you will make in your bonus. And so when it's all judged on that, you get a skewed version of what life is like because then you judge everybody on how much money they make. And it's not even your fault because that's how you are judged at work every day. So a lot of it is just that you are a product of your environment. So then out in the real world [where] people aren't making that much money, then they don't really matter. They don't really count, so you can treat the guy that gives you coffee as a lesser citizen.

money as a flattening and dehumanising device

—p.260 by Karen Ho 4 years, 7 months ago