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56

Breakout

Jobs and Woz change the game

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Fisher, A. (2018). Breakout. In Fisher, A. Valley of Genius: The Uncensored History of Silicon Valley (As Told by the Hackers, Founders, and Freaks Who Made It Boom). Twelve, pp. 56-73

65

Randy Wigginton: Steve was never very technical, even though he liked to say he was, but he really never was. I don’t know that he could actually program or design hardware. I never saw any evidence of it. He was more interested in the Homebrew Computer Club as a way to make a business. I mean he just wanted to work for himself, he always wanted to be in control of his own destiny. He really wanted to be rich when he was young.

Steve Wozniak: Steve wasn’t into social good. He was into “Do we have something that can make money?” He was always looking at that. He’d been selling my stuff for five years. He’d come into town about once every couple years and see what I’d created lately and he’d turn it into money. He was really money oriented at the start.

think about this more. on the one hand, people insist that his macro motives were financial. otoh, his day-to-day decisions (esp product ones) weren't necessarily strictly financial. maybe in the big picture yeah, but he was motivated by other pressing needs too (re: design)

money as what? crutch to fall back on? social validation?

—p.65 by Adam Fisher 1 year ago

Randy Wigginton: Steve was never very technical, even though he liked to say he was, but he really never was. I don’t know that he could actually program or design hardware. I never saw any evidence of it. He was more interested in the Homebrew Computer Club as a way to make a business. I mean he just wanted to work for himself, he always wanted to be in control of his own destiny. He really wanted to be rich when he was young.

Steve Wozniak: Steve wasn’t into social good. He was into “Do we have something that can make money?” He was always looking at that. He’d been selling my stuff for five years. He’d come into town about once every couple years and see what I’d created lately and he’d turn it into money. He was really money oriented at the start.

think about this more. on the one hand, people insist that his macro motives were financial. otoh, his day-to-day decisions (esp product ones) weren't necessarily strictly financial. maybe in the big picture yeah, but he was motivated by other pressing needs too (re: design)

money as what? crutch to fall back on? social validation?

—p.65 by Adam Fisher 1 year ago