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77

A World of Dread and Fear

2
terms
2
notes

Fisher, M. (2018). A World of Dread and Fear. In Fisher, M. K-punk: The Collected and Unpublished Writings of Mark Fisher. Repeater, pp. 77-82

78

Counterfactuals are largely the preserve of the reactionary Right, and Peace refuses the temptation to change the facts. He writes his retro-speculative fiction in the spaces between the recorded facts, extrapolating, inferring, guessing. Yet the question the reader cannot help but pose is: what would have happened if the miners had won? (A question that has added piquancy since subsequent revelations have shown that the government was much closer to defeat than was ever suspected at the time.) The narrative in which the Strike is now embedded - the only narrative in town, the story of Global Capital - has it that it was part of a receding ebb tide of organised working class insurgency. Defeat was inevitable, written into the historical passage from Fordism to post-Fordism. The hard Left are outflanked, fighting under the banner of the Past for "the history of the Miner. The tradition of the Miner. The legacies of their fathers and their fathers' fathers."

But such a narrativisation is question-begging, since the very credibility of this story relies upon the events of the strike unfolding as they did. What if they hadn't? Under the aspect of eternity, everything is inevitable and we are all Spinozists. But life has to be lived 'forward', making us Sartreans. Reading the book now inevitably dramatizes the tension between these two positions, between knowing that everything has already happened and acting as if it hasn't.

—p.78 by Mark Fisher 3 years, 1 month ago

Counterfactuals are largely the preserve of the reactionary Right, and Peace refuses the temptation to change the facts. He writes his retro-speculative fiction in the spaces between the recorded facts, extrapolating, inferring, guessing. Yet the question the reader cannot help but pose is: what would have happened if the miners had won? (A question that has added piquancy since subsequent revelations have shown that the government was much closer to defeat than was ever suspected at the time.) The narrative in which the Strike is now embedded - the only narrative in town, the story of Global Capital - has it that it was part of a receding ebb tide of organised working class insurgency. Defeat was inevitable, written into the historical passage from Fordism to post-Fordism. The hard Left are outflanked, fighting under the banner of the Past for "the history of the Miner. The tradition of the Miner. The legacies of their fathers and their fathers' fathers."

But such a narrativisation is question-begging, since the very credibility of this story relies upon the events of the strike unfolding as they did. What if they hadn't? Under the aspect of eternity, everything is inevitable and we are all Spinozists. But life has to be lived 'forward', making us Sartreans. Reading the book now inevitably dramatizes the tension between these two positions, between knowing that everything has already happened and acting as if it hasn't.

—p.78 by Mark Fisher 3 years, 1 month ago

(verb) to win over by wiles; entice / (verb) to acquire by ingenuity or flattery; wangle

78

Miners were inveigled into identifying with their own terrirory rather than with the industry as whole

[sic] for terrirory

—p.78 by Mark Fisher
notable
3 years, 1 month ago

Miners were inveigled into identifying with their own terrirory rather than with the industry as whole

[sic] for terrirory

—p.78 by Mark Fisher
notable
3 years, 1 month ago

(noun) a person having many diverse activities or responsibilities / (noun) a general servant

79

Everything we see of Sweet is focalized through his chauffeur-factotum, Neil Fontaine.

—p.79 by Mark Fisher
uncertain
3 years, 1 month ago

Everything we see of Sweet is focalized through his chauffeur-factotum, Neil Fontaine.

—p.79 by Mark Fisher
uncertain
3 years, 1 month ago
81

In GB84 the result is more poetic than most poetry; it is, naturally, a poetry stripped of all lyricism, a harshly dissonant word-music. Peace is a writer particularly attentive to sound: the unsleeping vigilance of state power is signified by the 'Click, Click' of the telephone tap , the massed ranks of the police by the Krk, Krk of boots and truncheons beaten against shields, both sounds repeated so much that they become background noise, part of the ambience of paranoia. [...]

cool

—p.81 by Mark Fisher 3 years, 1 month ago

In GB84 the result is more poetic than most poetry; it is, naturally, a poetry stripped of all lyricism, a harshly dissonant word-music. Peace is a writer particularly attentive to sound: the unsleeping vigilance of state power is signified by the 'Click, Click' of the telephone tap , the massed ranks of the police by the Krk, Krk of boots and truncheons beaten against shields, both sounds repeated so much that they become background noise, part of the ambience of paranoia. [...]

cool

—p.81 by Mark Fisher 3 years, 1 month ago